Mall Maker: Victor Gruen, Architect of an American Dream

Overview

The shopping mall is both the most visible and the most contentious symbol of American prosperity. Despite their convenience, malls are routinely criticized for representing much that is wrong in America—sprawl, conspicuous consumption, the loss of regional character, and the decline of Mom and Pop stores. So ubiquitous are malls that most people would be suprised to learn that they are the brainchild of a single person, architect Victor Gruen.

An immigrant from Austria who fled...

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Overview

The shopping mall is both the most visible and the most contentious symbol of American prosperity. Despite their convenience, malls are routinely criticized for representing much that is wrong in America—sprawl, conspicuous consumption, the loss of regional character, and the decline of Mom and Pop stores. So ubiquitous are malls that most people would be suprised to learn that they are the brainchild of a single person, architect Victor Gruen.

An immigrant from Austria who fled the Nazis in 1938, Gruen based his idea for the mall on an idealized America: the dream of concentrated shops that would benefit the businessperson as well as the consumer and that would foster a sense of shared community. Modernist Philip Johnson applauded Gruen for creating a true civic art and architecture that enriched Americans' daily lives, and for decades he received praise from luminaries such as Lewis Mumford, Winthrop Rockefeller, and Lady Bird Johnson. Yet, in the end, Gruen returned to Europe, thoroughly disillusioned with his American dream.

In Mall Maker, the first biography of this visionary spirit, M. Jeffrey Hardwick relates Gruen's successes and failures—his work at the 1939 World's Fair, his makeover of New York's Fifth Avenue boutiques, his rejected plans for reworking entire communities, such as Fort Worth, Texas, and his crowning achievement, the enclosed shopping mall. Throughout Hardwick illuminates the dramatic shifts in American culture during the mid-twentieth century, notably the rise of suburbia and automobiles, the death of downtown, and the effect these changes had on American life. Gruen championed the redesign of suburbs and cities through giant shopping malls, earnestly believing that he was promoting an American ideal, the ability to build a community. Yet, as malls began covering the landscape and downtowns became more depressed, Gruen became painfully aware that his dream of overcoming social problems through architecture and commerce was slipping away. By the tumultuous year of 1968, it had disappeared.

Victor Gruen made America depend upon its shopping malls. While they did not provide an invigorated sense of community as he had hoped, they are enduring monuments to the lure of consumer culture.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Victor Gruen may well have been the most influential architect of the twentieth century."—Malcom Gladwell, New Yorker

"Mall Maker is an important book. . . . The fact that Gruen's buildings are more lived in than the work of nearly any other modern architect makes him a designer worth reading about."—Metropolis Magazine

"An insightful account . . . in lucid prose."—New York Times

"Hardwick's thesis is compelling . . . : instead of saving the city, Gruen inadvertently contributed to its demise."—Washington Times

"A pioneering book on a seriously neglected subject, and everybody interested in the evolution of twentieth-century cities should read it."—Alex Garvin, Archives of American Art Journal

"Hardwick brings fresh insight into the specific role of shopping centers in spawning the twin evils of sprawl and urban decline."—Enterprise & Society

Eric P. Nash
In lucid prose remarkably free of jargon, Hardwick, an editor at Smithsonian Books, concludes that malls did not transform the environment but simply created more sprawl. Gruen wrote bitterly of the United States as ''a 'clip joint,' where everybody is persuaded to buy what he doesn't need with money he doesn't own in order to impress people he actually can't stand.''
The New York Times
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812221107
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/8/2010
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

M. Jeffrey Hardwick is Senior Program Officer at the National Endowment for the Humanities. He earned his Ph.D. degree in American studies from Yale University.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Gruen Effect 1

1 Escaping from Vienna to Fifth Avenue 8

2 How Main Street Stole Fifth Avenue's Glitter 48

3 Wartime Planning for Postwar Posterity 72

4 Seducing the Suburban Autoist 91

5 A "Shoppers' Paradise" for Suburbia 118

6 Planning the New "Suburbscape" 142

7 Saving Our Cities 162

8 The Suburbanization of Downtown 193

Conclusion: "Those Bastard Developments" and Gruen's Legacy 210

Notes 225

Index 269

Acknowledgments 275

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