Malts & Milkshakes: 60 Recipes for Frosty, Creamy Frozen Treats

Malts & Milkshakes: 60 Recipes for Frosty, Creamy Frozen Treats

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by Autumn Martin
     
 

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This sweet collection of 60 recipes puts a new spin on an old-fashioned treat with comforting dessert drinks from times new and old!

Organized into sections covering Soda Fountain Classics, Modern Flavors, and Boozy Shakes, the 60 recipes for inspired shakes and malts utilize classic ingredients like malted milk and homemade syrups, as well as gourmet herbal

Overview

This sweet collection of 60 recipes puts a new spin on an old-fashioned treat with comforting dessert drinks from times new and old!

Organized into sections covering Soda Fountain Classics, Modern Flavors, and Boozy Shakes, the 60 recipes for inspired shakes and malts utilize classic ingredients like malted milk and homemade syrups, as well as gourmet herbal infusions and exotic spices. And this delicious volume doesn't stop at shakes! Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery adapts recipes for her signature creations for knock-out cookies, ice cream sandwiches, and sundaes.
Recipes include:
- Peanut Butter Shake
- Salted Malted Malt
- Passion Fruit Creamsicle Shake
- Earl Grey Shake
- Peach Cobbler Malt
- Bacon-Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Shake
- Lemon Curd Raspberry Shake
- Chocolate Espresso Whiskey Malt
- St-Germain and Huckleberry Shake
- Cherry Brandy Shake

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A tempting array of summer-perfect desserts.” —Jackie Burrell, San Jose Mercury News

I'm especially hooked on those beautiful, boozy shakes, the subject of Autumn's new book.... There are some very adult beverages on these pretty pages, including the Not Your Grandma's Apple Pie Shake, the Salt and Pepper Malt, and the Chocolate Espresso Whiskey Malt (make that one mine, please).” —Leslie Kelly, Seattle Magazine

“This is a perfect cookbook for summer. There are so many inviting recipes you won't know which one to choose to make first.” —Tampa Bay Times

“When Malts & Milkshakes...arrived in our office we were instantly enamored.” —South Sound Magazine

“Sixty variations on the creamy drink, all of them perfect for summer.” —The Daily Herald

“For Martin, creativity is key.... The cookbook showcases her diverse experience and tastes, ranging from the richness of a S'more shake to a surprising Watermelon Lime shake.... The book even caters to special dietary needs, so no one gets left out. It includes a non-dairy homemade ice cream made from coconut and hemp milk along with other all-natural ingredients that make for a delightful substitute.” —Josh Kerns, MyNorthwest.com

Malts & Milkshakes will inspire you to take your homemade milkshake game to a gourmet level.... Milk shakes are the new juice fast.” —theStranger.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250014641
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
04/09/2013
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
787,098
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 7.34(h) x 0.32(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Malts & Milkshakes

60 Recipes for Frosty, Creamy, Frozen Treats


By Autumn Martin, Clare Barboza, Dana Youlin

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2013 becker&mayer! LLC
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4668-3689-1



CHAPTER 1

appreciating your ingredients: they can make all the difference


In my career, I have learned the quality of ingredients plays a huge role in the success of a recipe. If you start with poor-quality ingredients, the end result of your dish will reflect that. So I believe in starting with the best; for me, that means local, organic, and/or responsibly grown and produced.

I am not a huge stickler when it comes to a certification, but I love to know the story behind the ingredients I use whenever possible. When you buy food that is fresh and in season, the flavor is so much more potent — it makes all the difference in your flavor profile! To that end, I am a fan of using whole, fresh fruit as opposed to fruit-flavored syrups and powders. Most manufactured syrups are corn syrup–based and contain artificial flavorings and colorings. This book strives to achieve the most intense flavors with the purest methods and ingredients.


ICE CREAM

There are two basic types of ice cream in the world: those made with eggs and those made without. A custard-based ice cream is made with eggs or just egg yolks. The other is made only with milk, cream, and sugar. Whichever style, there should be just four foundation ingredients: milk, cream, sugar, and sometimes eggs. Mass-produced ice cream has all sorts of other things added to it to keep costs down, textures smooth, and who knows what else. But I believe, the fewer ingredients, the better. You can make the shakes in this book with store-bought ice cream, or you can make your own using the recipes provided or your own favorite recipe.


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

It is best to use produce that is in season and that has been picked when ripe. This produce has been allowed to ripen naturally and will have the highest concentration of delicious sugars, which provide a ton of flavor. If you can source your fruit and veggies close to home, that would be your best option. Unless of course you need mangoes and bananas, which are tropical and will most likely need to travel. Beware of frozen fruit that lacks any resemblance to fresh fruit. I have found that the flavor of frozen peaches, in particular, is difficult to match that of fresh peaches.


HERBS AND SPICES

The herb of a plant (in culinary speak) is its leaf and stem, while the spice comes from its seed, berry, root, and bark. I love including herbs and spices in my recipes, either whole or by way of infusions. There are so many roads to travel down using these amazing culinary transformatives. The saying "spice it up" didn't come from the clear blue sky: spices can create heat in a dish or enhance the flavors of a vegetable or fruit. They are also medicinal healers. Herbs and spices can be one of your best friends in the creative kitchen.


SUGAR

Ah, sugar. Sugar, sugar, sugar. I bet people were so elated when they discovered sugar! Lucky for us, sugar comes in many forms: cane sugar, maple syrup, honey, fruit, and rice syrup, to name a few. The most commonly used sugar — including in ice cream — comes from sugar cane. Sugar cane is grown in tropical regions and starts out as a juice, then makes its way down to a dry, crystalline form. In most of our recipes at Hot Cakes we use organic cane sugar, which tends to have a slightly larger crystal structure and a bit more residual molasses, meaning it isn't washed as much as "white" sugar, so it is actually a very light tan color.

Brown sugars come from cane as well but contain a lot more molasses than white sugar. In the traditional method of processing brown sugar, the cane simply isn't washed as many times, so a lot of the molasses stays in. Manufacturers can control the amount of molasses, thus making "light" or "dark" brown sugars. I prefer to use a dark brown sugar as it has more moisture and flavor than the lighter type.


DAIRY

Dairy plays a huge role in milkshakes. We use organic milk and cream from northern Washington State at Hot Cakes. The product is amazing — it comes from a single-farm operation, meaning they milk their cows and process and bottle all in the same place. Be sure to use milk and cream from cows that aren't fed antibiotics or growth hormones — these things aren't good for our bodies or theirs.


NONDAIRY MILKS

I know so many people who are allergic to dairy or are vegan and choose not to drink it. The fantastic news is that all of these shakes work great with nondairy ice creams and milks. For my shakes, I really like to use a combination of hemp and coconut milks — hemp milk is nutty, thick, and compliments the flavor of coconut nicely. But really, your choice of milk will do. I like to add malted barley powder to my nondairy shakes as a thickener. It also adds a lovely richness.


COFFEES AND TEAS

Perhaps you are a coffee drinker? Or maybe you prefer tea? And just maybe, you don't partake in either. Follow this simple rule when making a milkshake using either of these ingredients: if you wouldn't drink it alone, don't put it in your milkshake. Also, always use the correct temperature of water or milk when steeping, to avoid extracting undesirable bitter flavors.

CHAPTER 2

equipment


ICE CREAM AND SORBET MAKERS

How important is it to make your own ice cream for these shakes? The answer totally depends on how much you like to be in the kitchen. If you love to make your own fresh ice cream, awesome — try these recipes and use them for these shakes. If you don't, store-bought ice cream will make lovely shakes as well.

Should you choose to make your own ice cream, there are many different kinds of machines to get the job done. I use the Cuisinart 2-quart machine, and it produces a fine ice cream. But maybe you like the old-fashioned method of the salt and ice hand-crank? Whatever method you choose, just remember to start out with a very cold ice cream base.


BLENDERS

There are many different ways to blend your shake. I chose to experiment with three different types.

The classic countertop blender: This guy is good for shakes with chunks to break up. Many of the recipes in this book contain ingredients that need to be broken down before the ice cream is added, and this blender does the trick.

The milkshake blender: I really love the texture of shakes made in a milkshake blender. Because its blades are not sharp or shaped like a blade, they don't "chop" or "slice" the ice cream but rather simply move it around really fast, causing it to break down. So the result is a creamier shake. But its downfall is that you can't pre-blend ingredients before adding the ice cream. So sometimes I would pre-blend with an immersion blender, then add the ice cream and finish with the milkshake blender.

The handheld immersion blender: This is one of the handiest tools in the kitchen. It is so convenient and turns out an excellent milkshake. It works much like a countertop blender, but you can move the blade around, which is nice. You could also make a giant milkshake in a 5-gallon bucket with an immersion blender if you wanted!

Which one is the best? Well, they're all pretty darn good. I love the versatility blade blenders offer — especially for chopping chunks — but I also love the texture a milkshake blender yields. If I had to choose one, it would be the blade blender. Whether you use a countertop version or a handheld immersion blender, it produces a lovely shake and you can usually find them at the thrift store for under $20!

CHAPTER 3

quick tips for a perfect shake every time


You might be thinking, "C'mon, it can't be that hard to make a milkshake!" The truth is, it is not very hard at all if you have the basics down. I can honestly say that the first handful of milkshakes I made for this book just didn't have it. Once I discovered what "it" was, my shakes became exactly what I was looking for — creamy, thick, and fulfilling frozen drinks of goodness. Follow these tips for making amazing shakes:

1. Use soft ice cream. Place the ice cream on your counter for a good 5 to 10 minutes before you use it. The edges of the ice cream should begin to melt, and it should be easy to scoop from the container. This will prevent overmixing ...

2. Don't overmix! This is such a crucial step. Overmixing results in a thin shake. Blend the ice cream into the milk until it is just combined.

3. Use your blender's "pulse" button. By pulsing, you can effectively break down the ice cream without overblending.

4. Use chilled glasses. Put your glasses in the freezer for 20 minutes before serving the shake — it makes all the difference!

5. Don't add too much milk. If you are a fan of thicker shakes, you can easily omit some of the milk called for in these recipes. When adding less milk, it is really important to make sure you are using soft ice cream.

6. Use quality ingredients. That goes without saying.

CHAPTER 4

what you should know before you get shakin'


SCOOPS: The recipes in this book call for "scoops" of ice cream. My ice cream scoop measures 2 fluid ounces, which is a fairly common size. This means 8 scoops is 2 cups, or 1 pint, of ice cream. So whenever you see a recipe calling for 8 scoops of ice cream, know that it is exactly 1 pint. Easy!

MILK: I like to use whole milk. I find the extra fat yields a thicker and creamier shake.

MILK POWDER: Anytime I call for milk powder in a recipe, I am referring to nonfat milk powder. I love the Organic Valley brand.

SUGAR: I always use organic sugar, which is a bit darker than white sugar, from residual molasses. In turn, it has a deeper flavor than white sugar, and I suggest using it if you can. Otherwise, white sugar will do.

MALT POWDER: Anytime I call for malt powder in a recipe, I am referring to malted milk powder. You can find this at your local grocery store.

DOUBLING UP: If you are making a shake for one or two, please feel free to reduce the recipe. The recipes work well cut right in half. Or you can double it too if you want extra-large shakes or are serving a group. Just make sure you have enough room in your blender before doubling. Most counter blenders have a capacity of 4 to 6 cups, but if you are using an immersion blender and a large pitcher, you could make it all fit.

SERVING SIZES: Traditionally milkshakes are served in the classic soda fountain glass, which is 12 ounces. But really, that is a lot of ice cream to consume in one sitting. I think, especially if the shakes are rich enough, you can be satisfied with a little less. So most of the shakes in this book are meant to be served in 6-ounce juice glasses.

CHAPTER 5

basic recipes


ICE CREAM RECIPES:I am a fan of thick, rich, creamy textures. So I prefer ice creams made from custards. Custard ice creams are made with milk, sometimes cream, egg yolks, and sugar. The egg yolks help minimize the water content, thus creating fewer ice crystals, which in turn creates a creamier texture. The addition of milk powder also contributes to a creamy, thick texture.


VANILLA ICE CREAM

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

GINGER ICE CREAM

VANILLA NONDAIRY ICE CREAM

CHOCOLATE NONDAIRY ICE CREAM


vanilla ice cream

Prep time: 1 day | Active time: 35 minutes Makes about 1 pint plus 1 cup


INGREDIENTS

4 large egg yolks, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons milk powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
½ teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup milk
2 cups heavy cream


INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a medium metal bowl, combine the egg yolks and sugar. Whisk the yolks until they are pale and fluffy, about 2 minutes.

2. Add the milk powder, vanilla, and salt, and mix until they are combined thoroughly.

3. In a medium saucepan, scald the milk by bringing it to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat. With whisk in hand, pour a little hot milk into the egg mixture. Whisk well. Pour in more milk and whisk after each addition until you have a smooth consistency.

4. Have your cream measured and ready to go.

5. Pour the custard into the saucepan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with a spoon. Cook until the mixture coats the back of the spoon, about 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and immediately add the cream. Stir to combine, then using a fine mesh strainer (such as a chinoise), strain the custard into another clean bowl.

6. Refrigerate the mixture overnight, or you can do a "quick chill" in a shallow baking dish in the freezer. If using the freezer method, stir the custard every 10 minutes until the mixture is very cold and beginning to freeze slightly on the edges, about 1 hour. It is very important that the custard be evenly chilled and very cold.

7. Pour the cold custard into your ice cream maker. I use the Cuisinart 2-quart machine, and it takes about 30 to 35 minutes for the ice cream to freeze. Your time may vary slightly depending on what machine you use. You want your ice cream to freeze until it is thick enough to stand up on its own when you dip into it with a spoon. Imagine the consistency of soft-serve ice cream — it should be thick enough to hold peaks.

8. As soon as your ice cream is done, transfer it to a container with a lid and put it in the freezer immediately. I suggest letting it freeze overnight or for at least 6 hours.


LIGHTLY WHIPPED CREAM

Active time: 10 minutes

Makes ½ cup, or enough to top 4 shakes


INGREDIENTS

¼ cup heavy cream, chilled
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Make sure your cream is as cold as can be. In a small metal bowl, whisk the cream, sugar, and vanilla until soft peaks form. Use immediately.


chocolate ice cream

Prep time: 1 day | Active time: 35 minutes

Makes about 1 pint plus 1 cup


INGREDIENTS

4 large egg yolks, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons milk powder
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup milk
½ cup cocoa powder
2 cups heavy cream


INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a medium metal bowl, combine the egg yolks and sugar. Whisk the yolks until they are pale and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the milk powder and salt, and mix until they are combined thoroughly.

2. In a medium saucepan, scald the milk by bringing it to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the cocoa powder to the hot milk and whisk until smooth. With whisk in hand, pour a little hot chocolate milk into the egg mixture. Whisk well. Pour in more chocolate milk and whisk after each addition until you have a smooth consistency.

3. Have your cream measured and ready to go.

4. Pour the custard into the saucepan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with a spoon. Cook until the mixture coats the back of the spoon, about 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and immediately add the cream. Stir to combine, then using a fine mesh strainer (such as chinoise), strain the custard into another clean bowl.

5. Refrigerate the mixture overnight, or you can do a "quick chill" in a shallow baking dish in the freezer. If using the freezer method, stir the custard every 10 minutes until the mixture is very cold and beginning to freeze slightly on the edges, about 1 hour. It is very important that the custard be evenly chilled and very cold.

6. Pour the cold custard into your ice cream maker. I use the Cuisinart 2-quart machine, and it takes about 30 to 35 minutes for the ice cream to freeze. Your time may vary slightly depending on what machine you use. You want your ice cream to freeze until it is thick enough to stand up on its own when you dip into it with a spoon. Imagine the consistency of soft-serve ice cream — it should be thick enough to hold peaks.

7. As soon as your ice cream is done, transfer it to a container with a lid and put it in the freezer immediately. I suggest letting it freeze overnight or for at least 6 hours.


on chocolate and cocoa powder

Not all chocolate is created equal. As with any crop, the tropical Theobroma cacao tree is subject to changes in different soil, climate, and growing practices, all of which can alter the flavor of the finished product: chocolate. Not to mention there are different varieties of cacao and fermenting and drying practices. Then, once in the factory, the way the cacao bean is manufactured can also affect the flavor. So you see, there are many ways in which one company's chocolate bar can taste completely different from another's.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Malts & Milkshakes by Autumn Martin, Clare Barboza, Dana Youlin. Copyright © 2013 becker&mayer! LLC. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

AUTUMN MARTIN is an award-winning chocolatier and owner of Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery, an artisan dessert shop and organic dessert company best known for their delicious Take-n-Bake Molten Chocolate Cake in mason jars, an organic line of caramel sauces, and cold-smoked chocolate chips. Autumn has been featured in Oprah magazine, The New York Times, Food + Wine, Bon Appetit, Whole Living, The Wall Street Journal, The Seattle Times, Sunset magazine, Daily Candy, Seattle magazine, Edible Seattle, and more.

Hot Cakes' products are sold in fine grocery stores and specialty retail shops across the country. Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery features malts and milkshakes among other delicious treats. Autumn also teaches caramel and truffle-making classes. She lives in Seattle, WA.

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Malts & Milkshakes: 60 Recipes for Frosty, Creamy, Frozen Treats 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Skips outsides
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gets the milkshake and oes back to the house with it