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Mama, Let's Dance
     

Mama, Let's Dance

4.4 5
by Patricia Hermes
 

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Mary Belle, Ariel, and Callie have been alone for a long time. Nobody knows where their mama is. One day, she was dancing in the kitchen with Callie. The next day, she was gone. Now it's up to Mary Belle and Ariel to take care of Callie. They put everything they have into taking care of their little sister, but there will always be something that they can not give her

Overview

Mary Belle, Ariel, and Callie have been alone for a long time. Nobody knows where their mama is. One day, she was dancing in the kitchen with Callie. The next day, she was gone. Now it's up to Mary Belle and Ariel to take care of Callie. They put everything they have into taking care of their little sister, but there will always be something that they can not give her. The one thing they all desperately need. Their mother.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Just like Papa did years before, Mama has gone off and left 16-year-old Ariel, 11-year-old Mary Belle and seven-year-old Callie to fend for themselves in rural North Carolina. Ariel's gas station work earns them just enough for food, but keeping their situation a secret from the county welfare people is a job in itself. Mary Belle runs the household sternly, refusing charity from even her good friend Amarius and his niece Dearly. But when Callie falls ill with measles, Mary Belle must finally ask for help. She is rightfully hardened and bitter, though her narrative occasionally sounds wise beyond her years. Callie's spirited naivete helps add sparkle to this emotion- filled and depressing tale. Disappointingly, Mary Belle's final redemption evokes neither triumph nor joy, but readers will appreciate her discovery that what constitutes a family has not much to do with genetics and everything to do with love. Ages 10-up. (Oct.)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 5-8The very qualities that keep Mary Belle's own feet planted firmly on the ground while her mother and sister dance are those that enable her to take charge and face tragedy when she and her siblings are abandoned. A haunting novel of broken dreams and stalwart dedication. (Sept. 1991)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590466332
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/28/1993
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.27(w) x 7.61(h) x 0.46(d)
Lexile:
720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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Mama, Let's Dance 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Its about Callie, Ariel and Mary Belle, who were abandoned by their mother who 'danced away.' Mary BElle is only eleven and she has the responsibility to take care of herself and seven-year-old Callie. Sixteen year old Ariel has to work in order for them to have money. When Callie gets deathly ill, will Mary BElle risk the discovery of them being abandoned and risk Callie's health?
Guest More than 1 year ago
i think that this book is the best book i have ever read. it is very well put together and so are all her other books
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book is about three kids who have been left by their parents they are trying to live alone without anyone relizing it or finding out but their ex-gardner does he helps them out but after a big meal he makes them the sister gets sick she is only a little kid and she is fighting for her life all because they did not have proper care when their mother left it is a sad book that shows the courage of a brother and two sisters
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this in elementary school many years ago. The story has a lasting impression. At the time I did not enjoy the book at all. I was a very sensitive child and dealt with depression. I remember finding the story upsetting and sad, and at points I balled my eyes out. I was also depressed for about a month afterwards. Being so young (with a sheltered and perfect viewpoint of the world) I was not ready to be exposed to the challenging and upsetting situation/s in the book (abandonment of mother, isolation, sickness, death of a child). So looking back on it now, I would suggest that the book be read by older children (5th grade- 8th grade)who have fairly thick skin. Letting a sad third grader read it is not a good idea. The story is very absorbing and I still remember it quite well, probably because it upset me so much. But it is a good story and a lot can be learned from it. Present it to a child who already knows the world is very diverse and nothing is perfect.