Mama Mine, Mama Mine

Mama Mine, Mama Mine

by Rita Gray, Ponder Goembel
     
 

When will you come back, Mama Mine, mama mine?

What do mamas do when they're away? Mama Mouse must leave to get a fresh pea for her babies' dinner. Mama Sheep needs to have her wool shorn in the barn. And the human mama must do chores around the farm. But every mama on the farm comes home to her babies when her job is done, always repeating to her little

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Overview

When will you come back, Mama Mine, mama mine?

What do mamas do when they're away? Mama Mouse must leave to get a fresh pea for her babies' dinner. Mama Sheep needs to have her wool shorn in the barn. And the human mama must do chores around the farm. But every mama on the farm comes home to her babies when her job is done, always repeating to her little ones, “I'll come back, come back to you.”

A sweet and reassuring book, perfect for working moms and anxious toddlers, featuring a farm full of adorable baby animals.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Moms, human or animal, leave their young to attend to the business at hand. The human mother is doing chores, the cat is stalking a rat, the sheep is being sheared, the cow is grazing, and the duck is nibbling reeds. Each assures her young that she will be back after she is done, but the prose is stiff and awkward to read aloud and it is not particularly comforting. Goembel's drawings of the mother and caregiver (grandmother?) are wooden and lack expression. They do not make eye contact with the young child, and are instead shown to be blandly staring off into the distance with slight smiles on their faces. Even the activities on the farm, which could be exciting and full of interest, seem ho-hum. The animal illustrations have more appeal than those of the humans, particularly the kittens playing and the ducks on the shore. Words and illustrations just do not come together in this slim offering. Reviewer: Peg Glisson
School Library Journal

PreS- In this calm, reassuring picture book, a toddler stays with an older woman, presumably his grandmother, while his mother cares for a variety of farm critters. The rhyming text queries each animal mother, "When will you come back?" and the creature answers by assuring her offspring that she will return as soon as her work is done. "When will you come back,/Mama cow, mama cow?/After I graze beneath the bough/Where grass grows green, mooo, mooo!/I'll come back, come back to you." The story ends with the boy's mother returning after completing her chores and giving him a hug. Goembel's soft, realistic illustrations reinforce the gentle mood of the text. In the tradition of Kate Banks's Close Your Eyes (Farrar, 2002) and Margaret Wise Brown's The Runaway Bunny (HarperCollins, 1942), this book about a mother's boundless love makes a good choice for sharing at bedtime, or for soothing young listeners who have faced a particularly challenging day.-Kathleen Whalin, York Public Library, ME

Kirkus Reviews
In a farm setting, a human mother and assorted animal moms leave their offspring to take care of business: do farm chores (human), stalk a rat (cat), get shod (horse) and so forth. Each promises to return when her task is done. The stiff and jerky rhymes read awkwardly, working against the soothing message of reassurance. The illustrations of human beings-especially the mother, child and caregiver who anchor the story-are static, almost ominously devoid of warmth. They make no eye contact, staring past one another with bland smiles, a kind of rural Stepford family. This lack of emotional connection is puzzling given the subject matter: allaying the anxieties of small children when Mommy disappears from view. The portrayal of daily farm life, the book's subtext, is also curiously flat, but the attractive animal illustrations provide some of the appeal and charm missing from their human counterparts. (Picture book. 2-5)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525472063
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/27/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.38(w) x 11.22(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Rita Gray is the author of several picture books, including Easy Street. She lives with her family in New York City.

Ponder Goembel is the illustrator of many popular picture books, including Sailor Moo, by Lisa Wheeler. She lives in Pennsylvania.

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