The Mammoth Hunters (Earth's Children #3)

( 346 )

Overview

Once again, Jean M. Auel opens the door of time to reveal an age of wonder and terror at the dawn of humanity. With all the consummate storytelling artistry and vivid authenticity she brought to The Clan Of The Cave Bear and its sequel, The Valley Of Horses, Jean M. Auel continues the breathtaking epic journey of the woman called Ayla. Now, with her devoted Jondalar, Ayla boldly sets forth into the land of the Mamutoi--the Mammoth Hunters, the Others she has been seeking. Though Ayla must learn their strange ...
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The Mammoth Hunters (Earth's Children #3)

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Overview

Once again, Jean M. Auel opens the door of time to reveal an age of wonder and terror at the dawn of humanity. With all the consummate storytelling artistry and vivid authenticity she brought to The Clan Of The Cave Bear and its sequel, The Valley Of Horses, Jean M. Auel continues the breathtaking epic journey of the woman called Ayla. Now, with her devoted Jondalar, Ayla boldly sets forth into the land of the Mamutoi--the Mammoth Hunters, the Others she has been seeking. Though Ayla must learn their strange customs and language, it is because of her uncanny hunting and healing skills that she is adopted into the Mammoth Hearth. Here Ayla finds her first women friends, and painful memories of the Clan she left behind. Here, too, is Ranec, the dark-skinned, magnetic master carver of ivory tusks to whom Ayla is irresistibly drawn--setting Jondalar on fire with jealousy. Throughout the icy winter, Ayla is torn between her two men. But soon will come the great spring mammoth hunt, when Ayla must choose her mate and her destiny -- to remain in the Hearth with Ranec, or to follow Jondalar into a far-off place and an unknown future.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The authenticity of background detail, the lilting prose rhythms and the appealing conceptual audacity that won many fans for The Clan of the Cave Bear and The Valley of the Horses continue to work their spell in this third installment of Auel's projected six-volume Earth's Children saga set in Ice Age Europe. The heroine, 18-year-old Ayla, cursed and pronounced dead by the ``flathead'' clan that reared her, now takes her chances with the mammoth-hunting Mamutoi, attended by her faithful lover, Jondalar. Gradually overcoming the prejudice aroused by her flathead connection, Ayla wins acceptance into the new clan through her powers as a healer, her shamanistic potential, her skill with spear and slingshot and her way with animals (she rides a horse, domesticates a wolf cub, both ``firsts,'' it would seem, and even rides a lion). She also wins the heart of a bone-carving artist of ``sparkling wit'' (not much in evidence), which forces her to make a painful choice between the curiously complaisant Jondalar, her first instructor in love's delights, and this more charismatic fellow. The story is lyric rather than dramatic, and Ayla and her lovers are projections of a romantic rather than a historical imagination, but readers caught up in the charm of Auel's story probably won't care.
Library Journal
Ayla, the prehistoric heroine of Auel's immensely popular series, meets a new clan, the mammoth hunters, in this eagerly awaited third installment to the saga. During her sojourn with this clan, Ayla and her lover, Jondalar, encounter a variety of crises triggered by Ayla's past and her involvement with another man. Auel has created an amazing and fascinating world. Every aspect of society and culture is accounted for; no detail is too small to be included. To enjoy this novel the reader must accept the author's concepts and cultural descriptions. Despite the sometimes too-modern dialogue and the often fatuous sex, this is a solid tale that will be particularly enjoyed by those who've been following Ayla's fortunes. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club dual main selections. Lydia Burruel, Mesa P.L., Ariz.
From the Publisher
"Lively and interesting."
The Washington Post Book World
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553280944
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/28/1986
  • Series: Earth's Children Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 85,163
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 4.32 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

In 1980, Jean M. Auel became a literary legend with The Clan of the Cave Bear, the first book in her Earth’s Children® series. Now a mother, grandmother, and author who has sold more than 45 million copies worldwide, Auel is a heroine of history and prehistory alike, changing the world one enthralling page at a time.

Biography

Born in Chicago in 1936, Jean Marie Untinen married Ray Bernard Auel after high school, raised five children, and attended college at night while working for an electronics firm in Portland, Oregon. Shortly after earning her MBA in 1976, she was inspired by a story idea so powerful it effectively consumed her for the next few years. In a single creative burst, she conceived a sweeping epic set in prehistoric Europe and featuring a unique heroine: a young Cro-Magnon woman named Ayla, raised as a misfit in a society of inhospitable Neandertals. Auel quit her job, immersed herself in research, and began writing nearly nonstop.

At first, Auel imagined she had the makings of a single book. But when she completed her first draft (more than 450,000 words!), she realized that the story fell naturally into six parts, each one demanding a novel all its own. She worked feverishly on the first installment, revising parts of it as many as 20 and 30 times. Published in 1980, The Clan of the Cave Bear became an instant bestseller, marking the start of the thrilling, totally original Ice Age saga, Earth's Children.

The series owes much of its appeal to Auel's feminist protagonist Ayla, a preternaturally resourceful woman with all the skills and abilities of men but without their warlike qualities. She is the first to ride a horse, tame a wolf, and make fire from flint; she understands the healing power of herbs; and, as the novels progress, she develops mystical, even shamanic powers. Readers were understandably intrigued.

Although Auel writes speculative fiction, she receives high marks for historical accuracy. In the interest of creating an authentic Ice Age setting, her research has led her in interesting, unpredictable directions. She has read extensively, traveled to archeological sites around the world, and learned through various sources how to knapp flint, tan hides, construct snow caves, and prepare medicinal herbs. What emerges in her writing is a precise evocation of time and place that provides a realistic and enthralling backdrop to Ayla's adventures.

Good To Know

Jean's last name is pronounced like "owl."

Before becoming a bestselling novelist, Jean worked as a clerk, a circuit board designer, a credit manager, and a technical writer.

Jean's extensive research into Ice Age Europe has taken her to prehistoric sites in France, Austria, Czechoslovakia, the Ukraine, the Soviet Union, Hungary, and Germany.

When Jean first gazed at the Paleolithic paintings on the walls of Altamira's caves, she was so moved she began to cry.

Jean's advice to aspiring writers of historical fiction: "Write what you love to learn about."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Jean Marie Untinen Auel (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Portland, Oregon
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 18, 1936
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      M.B.A., University of Portland, 1976
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

Trembling with fear, Ayla clung to the tall man beside her as she watched the strangers approach. Jondalar put his arm around her protectively, but she still shook.

He's so big! Ayla thought, gaping at the man in the lead, the one with hair and beard the color of fire. She had never seen anyone so big. He even made Jondalar seem small, though the man who held her towered over most men. The red-haired man coming toward them was more than tall; he was huge, a bear of a man. His neck bulged, his chest could have filled out two ordinary men, his massive biceps matched most men's thighs.

Ayla glanced at Jondalar and saw no fear in his face, but his smile was guarded. They were strangers, and in his long travels he had learned to be wary of strangers.

"I don't recall seeing you before," the big man said without preamble. "What Camp are you from?" He did not speak Jondalar's language, Ayla noticed, but one of the others he had been teaching her.

"No Camp," Jondalar said. "We are not Mamutoi." He unclasped Ayla and took a step forward, holding out both hands, palms upward showing he was hiding nothing, in the greeting of friendliness. "I am Jondalar of the Zelandonii."

The hands were not accepted. "Zelandonii? That's a strange . . . Wait, weren't there two foreign men staying with those river people that live to the west? It seems to me the name I heard was something like that."

"Yes, my brother and I lived with them," Jondalar conceded.

The man with the flaming beard looked thoughtful for a while, then, unexpectedly, he lunged for Jondalar and grabbedthe tall blond man in a bone-crunching bear hug.

"Then we are related!" he boomed, a broad smile warming his face. "Tholie is the daughter of my cousin!"

Jondalar's smile returned, a little shaken. "Tholie! A Mamutoi woman named Tholie was my brother's cross-mate! She taught me your language."

"Of course! I told you. We are related." He grasped the hands that Jondalar had extended in friendship, which he had rejected before. "I am Talut, headman of the Lion Camp."

Everyone was smiling, Ayla noticed. Talut beamed a grin at her, then eyed her appreciatively. "I see you are not traveling with a brother now," he said to Jondalar.

Jondalar put his arm around her again, and she noticed a fleeting look of pain wrinkle his brow before he spoke. "This is Ayla."

"It's an unusual name. Is she of the river people?"

Jondalar was taken aback by the abruptness of his questioning, then, remembering Tholie, he smiled inwardly. The short, stocky woman he knew bore little resemblance to the great hulk of a man standing there on the riverbank, but they were chipped from the same flint. They both had the same direct approach, the same unselfconscious--almost ingenuous--candor. He didn't know what to say. Ayla was not going to be easy to explain.

"No, she has been living in a valley some days' journey from here."

Talut looked puzzled. "I have not heard of a woman with her name living nearby. Are you sure she is Mamutoi?"

"I'm sure she is not."

"Then who are her people? Only we who hunt mammoth live in this region."

"I have no people," Ayla said, lifting her chin with a touch of defiance.

Talut appraised her shrewdly. She had spoken the words in his language, but the quality of her voice and the way she made the sounds were . . . strange. Not unpleasant, but unusual. Jondalar spoke with the accent of a language foreign to him; the difference in the way she spoke went beyond accent. Talut's interest was piqued.

"Well, this is no place to talk," Talut said, finally. "Nezzie will give me the Mother's own wrath if I don't invite you to visit. Visitors always bring a little excitement, and we haven't had visitors for a while. The Lion Camp would welcome you, Jondalar of the Zelandonii, and Ayla of No People. Will you come?"

"What do you say, Ayla? Would you like to visit?" Jondalar asked, switching to Zelandonii so she could answer truthfully without fear of offending. "Isn't it time you met your own kind? Isn't that what Iza told you to do? Find your own people?" He didn't want to seem too eager, but after so long without anyone else to talk to, he was anxious to visit.

"I don't know," she said, frowning with indecision. "What will they think of me? He wanted to know who my people were. I don't have any people any more. What if they don't like me?"

"They will like you, Ayla, believe me. I know they will. Talut invited you, didn't he? It didn't matter to him that you have no people. Besides, you'll never know if they will accept you--or if you will like them--if you don't give them a chance. These are the kind of people you should have grown up with, you know. We don't have to stay long. We can leave any time."

"We can leave any time?"

"Of course."

Ayla looked down at the ground, trying to make up her mind. She wanted to go with them; she felt an attraction to these people, and a curiosity to know more about them, but she felt a tight knot of fear in her stomach. She glanced up and saw two shaggy steppe horses grazing on the rich grass of the plain near the river, and her fear intensified.

"What about Whinney! What will we do with her? What if they want to kill her? I can't let anyone hurt Whinney!"

Jondalar hadn't thought about Whinney. What would they think? he wondered. "I don't know what they will do, Ayla, but I don't think they would kill her if we tell them she is special and not meant for food." He remembered his surprise, and his initial feeling of awe over Ayla's relationship with the horse. It would be interesting to see their reaction. "I have an idea."

Talut did not understand what Ayla and Jondalar said to each other, but he knew the woman was reluctant, and the man was trying to coax her. He also noticed that she spoke with the same unusual accent, even in his language. His language, the headman realized, but not hers.

He was pondering the enigma of the woman with a certain relish--he enjoyed the new and unusual; the inexplicable challenged him. But then the mystery took on an entirely new dimension. Ayla whistled, loud and shrill. Suddenly, a hay-colored mare and a colt of an unusually deep shade of brown galloped into their midst, directly to the woman, and stood quietly while she touched them! The big man suppressed a shudder of awe. This was beyond anything he had ever known.

Was she Mamut? he wondered, with growing apprehension. One with special powers? Many of Those Who Served the Mother claimed magic to call animals and direct the hunt, but he had never seen anyone with such control over animals that they would come at a signal. She had a unique talent. It was a little frightening--but think how much a Camp could benefit from such talent. Kills could be so easy!

Just as Talut was getting over the shock, the young woman gave him another. Holding onto the mare's stiff stand-up mane, she sprang up on the back of the horse and sat astride her. The big man's mouth gaped open in astonishment as the horse with Ayla on her back galloped along the edge of the river. With the colt following behind, they raced up the slope to the steppes beyond. The wonder in Talut's eyes was shared by the rest of the band, particularly a young girl of twelve years. She edged toward the headman and leaned against him as though for support.

"How did she do that, Talut?" the girl asked, in a small voice that held surprise and awe, and a tinge of yearning. "That little horse, he was so close, I could almost have touched him."

Talut's expression softened. "You'll have to ask her, Latie. Or, perhaps, Jondalar," he said, turning to the tall stranger.

"I'm not sure myself," he replied. "Ayla has a special way with animals. She raised Whinney from a foal."

"Whinney?"

"That's as close as I can say the name she has given the mare. When she says it, you'd think she was a horse. The colt is Racer. I named him--she asked me to. That's Zelandonii for someone who runs fast. It also means someone who tries hard to be best. The first time I saw Ayla, she was helping the mare deliver the colt."

"That must have been a sight! I wouldn't think a mare would let anyone get close to her at that time," one of the other men said.

The riding demonstration had the effect Jondalar had hoped for, and he thought the time was right to bring up Ayla's concern. "I think she'd like to come and visit your Camp, Talut, but she's afraid you may think the horses are just any horses to be hunted, and since they are not afraid of people, they would be too easy to kill."

"They would at that. You must have known what I was thinking, but who could help it?"

Talut watched Ayla riding back into view, looking like some strange animal, half-human and half-horse. He was glad he had not come upon them unknowing. It would have been . . . unnerving. He wondered for a moment what it would be like to ride on the back of a horse, and if it would make him appear so startling. And then, picturing himself sitting astride one of the rather short, though sturdy, steppe horses like Whinney, he laughed out loud.

"I could carry that horse easier than she could carry me!" he said.

Jondalar chuckled. It hadn't been hard to follow Talut's line of thought. Several people smiled, or chuckled, and Jondalar realized they must all have been thinking about riding a horse. It was not so strange. It had occurred to him when he first saw Ayla on Whinney's back.

Ayla had seen the shocked surprise on the faces of the small band of people and, if Jondalar had not been waiting for her, she would have kept on going right back to her valley. She'd had enough of disapproval during her younger years for actions that were not acceptable. And enough freedom since, while she was living alone, not to want to subject herself to criticism for following her own inclinations. She was ready to tell Jondalar he could visit these people if he wanted; she was going back.

But when she returned, and saw Talut still chuckling over his mental picture of himself riding the horse, she reconsidered. Laughter had become precious to her. She had not been allowed to laugh when she lived with the Clan; it made them nervous and uncomfortable. Only with Durc, in secret, had she laughed out loud. It was Baby, and Whinney, who had taught her to enjoy the feeling of laughter, but Jondalar was the first person to share it openly with her.

She watched the man laughing easily with Talut. He looked up and smiled, and the magic of his impossibly vivid blue eyes touched a place deep inside that resonated with a warm, tingling glow, and she felt a great welling up of love for him. She couldn't go back to the valley, not without him. Just the thought of living without him brought a strangling constriction to her throat, and the burning ache of tears held back.

As she rode toward them, she noticed that, though Jondalar wasn't as big as the red-haired man in size, he was nearly as tall, and bigger than the other three men. No, one was a boy, she realized. And was that a girl with them? She found herself observing the group of people surreptitiously, not wanting to stare.

Her body movements signaled Whinney to a stop, then, swinging her leg over, she slid off. Both horses seemed nervous as Talut approached, and she stroked Whinney and put an arm around Racer's neck. She was as much in need of the familiar reassurance of their presence as they were of hers.

"Ayla, of No People," he said, not sure if it was a proper way to address her, though for this woman of uncanny talent, it well might be, "Jondalar says you fear harm will come to these horses if you visit with us. I say here, as long as Talut is headman of the Lion Camp, no harm will come to that mare or her young one. I would like you to visit, and bring the horses." His smile broadened with a chuckle. "No one will believe us otherwise!"

She was feeling more relaxed about it now, and she knew Jondalar wanted to visit. She had no real reason to refuse, and she was drawn to the easy, friendly laughter of the huge red-haired man.

"Yes, I come," she said. Talut nodded, smiling, and wondered about her, her intriguing accent, her awesome way with horses. Who was Ayla of No People?

Ayla and Jondalar had camped beside the rushing river and had decided that morning, before they met the band from the Lion Camp, that it was time to turn back. The waterway was too large to cross without difficulty, and not worth the effort if they were going to turn around and retrace their route. The steppeland east of the valley where Ayla had lived alone for three years had been more accessible, and the young woman hadn't bothered to take the difficult roundabout way to the west out of the valley very often, and was largely unfamiliar with that area. Though they had started out toward the west, they had no particular destination in mind, and ended up traveling north, and then east instead, but much farther than Ayla had ever traveled on her hunting forays.

Jondalar had convinced her to make the exploratory trip to get her used to traveling. He wanted to take her home with him, but his home was far to the west. She had been reluctant, and scared, to leave her secure valley to live with unknown people in an unknown place. Though he was eager to return after traveling for many years, he had reconciled himself to spending the winter with her in the valley. It would be a long trek back--likely to take a full year--and it would be better to start in late spring, anyway. By then, he was sure he could convince her to come with him. He didn't even want to consider any other alternative.

Ayla had found him, badly mauled and nearly dead, at the beginning of the warm season that was now seeing its last days, and she knew the tragedy he had suffered. They fell in love while she was nursing him back to health, though they were long in overcoming the barriers of their vastly different backgrounds. They were still learning each other's ways and moods.

Copyright 1986 by Jean M. Auel
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 346 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(208)

4 Star

(78)

3 Star

(43)

2 Star

(10)

1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 350 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    SPECTACULAR SETTINGS AND STORYLINE

    Great book for 3rd in Series. Characters rich and well thought out by writer. References to plant life/usage on the mark. Animal descriptions as accurate as I've ever seen. Geographical/topical detail in minutae. Ms Auel is often redundant with prior story background and descriptions of locals and plantlife, but above all the reading is still great. This series of books would make a great collection for a personal library so it could be read again and/or shared with others.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    Could not put it down

    You definately need to read Clan of the Cave Bear and Valley of the Horses first. They would not be nearly as good out of order. Wonderful insite into how early man developed and lived but written in such an exciting and romantic fashion. Excited to start the next in the series

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2011

    So so I guess...

    If this the first in the series you read you may like it, but it was the third for me. I found myself literally skipping over multitude of pages. It is like the author was looking for "filler" to 'make' a book. The descriptions of the environment, the animals, the feelings, the plants, the flint carving, everything went too far. Drama drama drama. I didn't like it much but had already paid for it, so I skimmed it. Don't spend money on it; go to a library and check it out for free.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2011

    multiple typos

    I cant believe almost EVERY page had typos to include special characters instead of letters... names switched which was confusing... what a mess... i recommend just reading it hard copy its not worth the frustration of reading it on your Nook!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommended

    Adored this one too. Must get the rest of the series

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    I have been a fan of the Earth's Children series by Jean M. Auel for many years. Always waited impatiently for the next book in the series. Love all the descriptions she gives of plants, animals and landscapes.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2011

    eBook errors are plentiful - on entire series!!!

    So sad - I have all of this series in hard copy, but really wanted them on my new Nook, especially with the new Land of the Painted Caves coming out next month! I started reading at the beginning, and was immediately struck by how AWFUL the translation to eBook had been - NEVER occurred to me that B&N didn't get access to the electronic files which the printers use when printing up new books, right? - NEVER occurred to me these books were OCRed, which means that many times the words are incorrect or missing. There are formatting issues like italics where it does not belong, a sentence that runs right off the page of the Nook never wrapping around. Punctuation that was incorrect or completely missing. And, unlike the old classics, we have to PAY for this. I actually needed to use my hard copy to be sure of what I was reading - in each edition!
    I wrote a letter of disgust to B&N, and was told - in short, that my issues were being sent on to the publisher and when they made corrections, it would automatically be uploaded to my Nook - BUT, that I was not entitled to any kind of refund per B&N blah, blah, blah.... Very sad. I have many other books on my Nook that are 10 & 20 years old yet there are no "typos" in those books. Be warned!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A worthy addition to the Earth's Children series

    This third book in the series is written just as well as the two before it. The descriptions of the plant and animal life make it easy to picture what these steps and plains must have been like. In this story, Ayla and Jondalar set out of the valley with their horses to explore the surrounding area. They come across the Lion Camp of the Mamutoi (Mammoth Hunters) and are invited to stay the winter with them. I thought it was fascinating to read how these people built an earth lodge complete with a hearth for each family, annexes for food storage and sweat baths and that they constructed it out of mammoth bones, hides, sod and silty mud. The interactions between these people, their social order, customs and beliefs were so vividly described, I felt as if I was there.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2000

    The Best Book I Have Ever Read

    The Mammoth Hunters are people that gave Ayla her home and her new friends. The book shows the life of two travellers among the Hunters. Jondalar loves Ayla and he is afraid to lose her. Ayla feels the same towards Jondalar, but she doesn't know if he loves her. The story is breathtaking and I am going to read the 4th book. Please, don't stop writing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Finished reading 12/3/11

    Interesting ready to read plains of passage

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 2, 2010

    Good Book, Terrible EBook Conversion

    Seems like the publisher ran this series through OCR conversion and didn't bother to spellcheck. The name "Brun" ends up being "Bran" until halfway through the book. Vowels are interchanged with predictably confusing results. This ebook is still able to be read and understood, but who wants to pay for a book filled with typos?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The first two books were better

    I have a strong love/hate relationship with this book. It wasn't nearly as good as the previous two books, and it was dragged on far too long. I felt that I would have enjoyed the novel a lot more if Jean had made it a few hundred pages shorter. The love story was nearly unbearable for me to read as the tension and frustration between the characters could have so easily been fixed yet they couldn't seem to figure it out for the entire book.

    However, this book is addicting. Once you start, you need to know how it's going to end. I definitely recommend reading the series. (Or if you are lazy, at least read the first two books).

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2000

    AWESOME BOOK!

    This book was one of the best in the series. I cannot put it down and can't wait to finish Ayla and Jondalar's adventures and find out if she stays a Mamutoi or stays with Jondalar - although I think I know which one she's gonna choose.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2013

    Fantastic reading for learning our past

    It's hard to doubt Darwin as far as his adaptation toughts go once you start reading Ms. Auel's "Mammoth Hunters". She brings a beautiful tale to life with exciting and in depth gimplises of our pre- historic forefathers. I wish we could as a whole live in harmony with nature & each other as they did. I Iove this book tremendously, I've read it several times already and I'm sure I'll read it again & again!

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  • Posted June 21, 2013

    Very good book- must get!

    I highly recommend this book and all the other books in this series by Jean M. Auel, even though I'm only in the middle of book 4 right now. I wouldn't recommend starting the series from this book, but it's worth reading if you have read the first two in the series. The problems Jondalar and Ayla get into in this book are resolved in the very last chapter, and I was sad to see them leave the Mamutoi, but all in all it was a very well written book. I'm going to continue the series until the end, even though I'm bogged down doing other things for work. Anyone who is interested in prehistory or the lives of the Cro-Magnon will find this series exceptionally well researched and brings to life the lives of the characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2013

    Amazibg Amazing

    Amazing

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  • Posted August 30, 2012

    One Star Only Because There Were No Lesser Options

    Humping and horticulture. Big schwanzes and berries while drying meat for freezing winters. Okay, that's the story. Ms. Auel really betrayed two great characters, Ayla and Jondalar, from the first two wonderful books in this series, Clan of the Cave Bear and Valley of the Horses, and went somewhere I had no desire to go. Books 4-6 are even worse.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    Fantastic!

    A friend loaned me book one "The Clan of the Cave Bear". I am now hooked. "The Mammoth Hunters" is fantastic. Jean Auel really digs into the life of humans of that era.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    It was good

    But it was my least favorite of the series. Still a GREAT read tho just not my personal favorite

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  • Posted January 21, 2012

    VERY VERY VERY GOOD---"EXCEPT" FOR CERTAIN DETAILS

    ONLY THING I DON'T CARE FOR IS ALL THE "DETAILED" SEX ACTS

    Yes I am going to continue with the series
    Yes I would recommend this series for book club discussions

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