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Mamouna
     

Mamouna

by Bryan Ferry
 

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Sufficiently recharged via Taxi, Ferry got down to business and the following year released Mamouna, notable among other things for being his first recordings with the help of Brian Eno since the latter split from Roxy Music back in 1973. Rather than playing the wild card as he so often did, though, Eno concentrates on (to use his

Overview

Sufficiently recharged via Taxi, Ferry got down to business and the following year released Mamouna, notable among other things for being his first recordings with the help of Brian Eno since the latter split from Roxy Music back in 1973. Rather than playing the wild card as he so often did, though, Eno concentrates on (to use his own descriptions in the credits) "swoop treatment" and "sonic awareness." Slightly more to the fore are Ferry's usual range of excellent musicians and pros. Steve Ferrone once again handles drums as he did on Taxi, while Richard Norris also reappears on loops and programming; other familiar faces include Nile Rodgers, Robin Trower (the album's co-producer), and Carleen Anderson. One of the most intriguing guest appearances comes at the very start -- "Don't Want to Know" has no less than five guitarists, including none other than Roxy's own Phil Manzanera. Whereas his '80s work seemed to fit the times just so, with his own general spin on things providing true individuality as a result, on Mamouna Ferry seems slightly stuck in place. Compared to the variety of Bete Noire, Mamouna almost seems a revamp of Boys and Girls. Combine that with some of Ferry's least compelling songs in a while, and Mamouna is something of a middling affair, almost too tasteful for its own good (and considering who this is, that's saying something). There are some songs of note -- "The 39 Steps" has a slightly menacing vibe to it, appropriate given the cinematic reference of the title, while the Ferry/Eno collaboration "Wildcat Days" displays some of Eno's old synth-melting flash. Overall, though, Mamouna is pleasant without being involving.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/28/2000
Label:
Emi Mod Afw
UPC:
0724384771522
catalogNumber:
47715
Rank:
104168

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Bryan Ferry   Primary Artist,Synthesizer,Piano,Vocals,Vocoder,Prophet Synthesizer,oberheim,Jupiter
Phil Manzanera   Guitar
Robin Trower   Electric Guitar
Maceo Parker   Alto Saxophone
Nile Rodgers   Rhythm Guitar
Paul Johnson   Bass (Vocal),Baritone (Vocal)
Carleen Anderson   Bass (Vocal),Baritone (Vocal)
Nathan East   Bass
Yanick Etienne   Bass (Vocal)
Steve Ferrone   Drums
Guy Fletcher   Synthesizer
Neil Hubbard   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Luis Jardim   Percussion
Neil Jason   Animal Sounds
Chester Kamen   Guitar
Andy Mackay   Alto Saxophone
Richard Norris   Loops
Mike Paice   Alto Saxophone
Pino Palladino   Bass
Guy Pratt   wah wah guitar
Steve Scales   Percussion
Jeff Thall   Guitar
Fonzi Thornton   Bass (Vocal),Baritone (Vocal)
David Williams   Guitar,Bass (Vocal),Rhythm Guitar
Jhelisa   Bass (Vocal)
Luke Cresswell   Percussion

Technical Credits

Bryan Ferry   Producer,Contributor,Art Direction
Robin Trower   Producer,Contributor
Rhett Davies   Contributor
Brian Eno   Contributor,Sonics
Neil Jason   Contributor
Chester Kamen   Contributor
Richard Norris   Engineer
Guy Pratt   Contributor
Jeff Thall   Contributor
James Ward   Paintings
Sven Taits   Engineer
Nan Kidwell   Contributor
Nicholas Deville   Art Direction
Zoe   Cover Model
Tamar   Cover Model

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