The Three Musketeers, THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK, Alexandre Dumas, (The Three Musketeers # 6) [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Man in the Iron Mask is a self-contained novel. It is sixth and last of the d'Artagnan Romances series. This book covers the year 1661-1673. D'Artagnan, the fourth and most important musketeer is based on an historical figure, who was eventually promoted to commander of the musketeers.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
The Three Musketeers, THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK, Alexandre Dumas, (The Three Musketeers # 6)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

The Man in the Iron Mask is a self-contained novel. It is sixth and last of the d'Artagnan Romances series. This book covers the year 1661-1673. D'Artagnan, the fourth and most important musketeer is based on an historical figure, who was eventually promoted to commander of the musketeers.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012341310
  • Publisher: Ryetown Classics
  • Publication date: 3/24/2011
  • Series: The Three Musketeers , #6
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 388,900
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 702 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(569)

4 Star

(59)

3 Star

(35)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(22)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 705 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    Who was the man in the iron mask?

    In life, he was sentenced to a cruel fate--in death, he would become a legend. Alexandre Dumas tells the tale of the mysterious man who was imprisoned in the Bastille starting in the 168o's until his death some thirty years later. During that time his face had been hidden by an iron mask. While his identity remains a mystery, there are some tantalizing clues which might remove the mask from the man. Most prisoners of the French prison were usually important people who had fallen out of favor with King Louis XIV. Given strict orders by the king, the Musketeers were to kill him if he removed his mask. He ate in the mask, slept in the mask, and eventually died in the mask. In 1717, Voltaire was imprisoned at the Bastille. According to him, the man in the iron mask was around 60 when he died, and bore a striking resemblance to a very famous aristocrat. Of course, the most famous aristocrat in France at that time was King Louis XIV, who was also in his 60's. Another prisoner at the Bastille, Joseph de Lagrange, asserted that Benigne d'Auvergne de Saint, the governor of Sainte Marguerite, treated the mystery man deferentially and referred to him as 'prince'. Stories about the mysterious prisoner are conflicting. Some state that he wore a mask of velvet, not iron. Evidence has surfaced saying that the prisoner was buried under the name M. de Marchiel. And later, a death certificate giving the prisoner's name as Marchioly and his age of 45 was found. Another states, that in 1789 Frederic Grimm, a famous writer, claimed that a valet had revealed to him that Louis XIV had an identical twin. And that Louis XIII, feared the brothers would grow up to fight over the throne, so he sent the second-born baby away to be raised in secret. The boy was taken into a nobleman's household and treated with great respect, but he was never told who he really was. As he grew up, he saw a portrait of King Louis XIV and guessed the truth. He was immediately arrested, and spent the rest of his life as the Man in the Iron Mask. Many people believed this to be false, and believe it was elaborated and embroidered by Alexandre Dumas as the years passed. It has been said that when the Bastille was stormed by a revolutionary mob, the prince's skeleton was discovered, still wearing his iron mask. Of course, there is no record that this actually happened.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent Book, Deceiving Title

    This book is the very final entry in the Three Musketeers Series by Alexandre Dumas. The Book brings about the end of all but one of the four musketeers who are: Athos, Porthos, Aramis and D'artagnan. The 'man in the iron mask' is the titular character of the book but he is only an incidental character in the story and he takes up approximately one quarter of the plot or less. The story involving the man in the iron mask and the very premise of the plot surrounding this character is very thrilling and intellectually pleasing. the back of the book describes the man in the iron mask as a prisoner whose face has been hidden from all for the eight years that he has been imprisoned in the Bastille and that he knows neither his name or why he is there. I will not give away why he is there and who he is but it is definitely a great surprise worth the read. The identity of this titular character is revealed very close to the beginning of the story and it will instantly have you hooked. It is worth reading much of the slow beginning to get to the parts of the story involving the man in the iron mask. Reading these parts about the clever devices that Aramis uses to execute his plan surrounding the man are enough to make one giddy. The book takes a different turn about 2/3 of the way through the book and the man in the iron mask is not heard from anymore. The rest of the story comprises of the final ventures of the three musketeers and how their lives come to an end. This part of the book is still very readable even to people who are not fluent in the first books surrounding the Three Musketeers and any person can find this book enjoyable.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2009

    Dumas is a great writer.

    Great story and excellent reading

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2008

    Who was the man in the iron mask?

    In life, he was sentenced to a cruel fate--in death, he would become a legend. Alexandre Dumas tells the tale of the mysterious man who was imprisoned in the Bastille starting in the 168o's until his death some thirty years later. During that time his face had been hidden by an iron mask. While his identity remains a mystery, there are some tantalizing clues which might remove the mask from the man. Most prisoners of the French prison were usually important people who had fallen out of favor with King Louis XIV. Given strict orders by the king, the Musketeers were to kill him if he removed his mask. He ate in the mask, slept in the mask, and eventually died in the mask. In 1717, Voltaire was imprisoned at the Bastille. According to him, the man in the iron mask was around 60 when he died, and bore a striking resemblance to a very famous aristocrat. Of course, the most famous aristocrat in France at that time was King Louis XIV, who was also in his 60's. Another prisoner at the Bastille, Joseph de Lagrange, asserted that Benigne d'Auvergne de Saint, the governor of Sainte Marguerite, treated the mystery man deferentially and referred to him as 'prince'. Stories about the mysterious prisoner are conflicting. Some state that he wore a mask of velvet, not iron. Evidence has surfaced saying that the prisoner was buried under the name M. de Marchiel. And later, a death certificate giving the prisoner's name as Marchioly and his age of 45 was found. Another states, that in 1789 Frederic Grimm, a famous writer, claimed that a valet had revealed to him that Louis XIV had an identical twin. And that Louis XIII, feared the brothers would grow up to fight over the throne, so he sent the second-born baby away to be raised in secret. The boy was taken into a nobleman's household and treated with great respect, but he was never told who he really was. As he grew up, he saw a portrait of King Louis XIV and guessed the truth. He was immediately arrested, and spent the rest of his life as the Man in the Iron Mask. Many people believed this to be false, and believe it was elaborated and embroidered by Alexandre Dumas as the years passed. It has been said that when the Bastille was stormed by a revolutionary mob, the prince's skeleton was discovered, still wearing his iron mask. Of course, there is no record that this actually happened.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2003

    Very intriguing

    This was so cool. I had not read the Three Musketeers, but after this book, I'm hooked. Alexandre Dumas is a great writer with a flare for suspenseful scenes.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2014

    Beautifully written by a true master. This is not Randall Walla

    Beautifully written by a true master. This is not Randall Wallace's 1998 film version, which bears very little in common with Dumas' masterpiece. It will make you curse, it will make you weep, and it will make you appreciate the demise of monarchy and the creation to democracy, no matter how flawed our system may be. Enjoy, if for no other reason than the beauty of the words.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 2, 2011

    Very heavy reading!

    If you are looking for this book to be anything like either of the last two movie versions, you will be sadly disappointed! I found the book to be long, the storyline to be convoluted and difficult to follow, and the ending to be not what was expected.

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2014

    Earthclaw

    Lays fown to sleep with his family. Gtgtb bbt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2014

    Flameclaw

    Pads in and makes a nest in the far back of the den

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2014

    Blazefire

    Setled ina nest

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2014

    Warriors den

    ~Blazeclan

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Leon ~ Rico

    Does he know this...?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Carrie

    Looks around and makes a barrier between me and everyhody else with ice

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Leon

    He watched, his eyes flicking around at the others.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Leon

    Gtgbbl

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2014

    A thirteen year old

    She walks in, her wolf tail dragging on the ground. "Hello." She whispers nervasly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    To flash

    U HAVE NO PEN<_>IS

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Flash ~ Tamari

    "Well what kind of powers would u like? I ask this because if u want a power i will match it with ur parent"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Flash ~ To flash

    "Yep!"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 705 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)