The Man Nobody Knows

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Overview

Bruce Barton's 1925 effort to reconfigure Jesus for the Roaring Twenties turned into one of the great best-sellers of the century. In The Man Nobody Knows, Barton depicted Christ as a man's man, not the meek, effeminate figure he had encountered in Sunday School. No Puritan or Prohibitionist, this Jesus turned water into wine and was "the most popular dinner guest in Jerusalem." Here was the world's first advertising man, whose parables sparkled as models for modern jingle writers. (Barton had co-founded the ...

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The Man Nobody Knows

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Overview

Bruce Barton's 1925 effort to reconfigure Jesus for the Roaring Twenties turned into one of the great best-sellers of the century. In The Man Nobody Knows, Barton depicted Christ as a man's man, not the meek, effeminate figure he had encountered in Sunday School. No Puritan or Prohibitionist, this Jesus turned water into wine and was "the most popular dinner guest in Jerusalem." Here was the world's first advertising man, whose parables sparkled as models for modern jingle writers. (Barton had co-founded the celebrated advertising firm of Batten, Barton, Durstine and Osborne.) Here was Christ, the world's greatest business executive, who "picked up twelve men from the bottom ranks of business and forged them into an organization that conquered the world." When in the 1950s Barton felt compelled to revise his often-reprinted book for a new generation, he blurred its focus. In this new edition, the historian Richard Fried revives the primary source in Barton's original language. Mr. Fried explores the book's rich insights into the culture of the 1920s, revealing not only the union of religion and business but changing attitudes toward consumption and leisure, sexuality and the roles of men and women.

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Editorial Reviews

Kim Phillips-Fein
His themes are, ahem, resurrected by businessmen who seek to enumerate the most common problems in business.
The American Prospect
Richard N. Ostilling
Barton is a pioneer in public relations...by making Jesus the founder of modern business.
Philadelphia Tribune
The American Prospect
His themes are, ahem, resurrected by businessmen who seek to enumerate the most common problems in business.
— Kim Phillips-Fein
Philadelphia Tribune
Barton is a pioneer in public relations...by making Jesus the founder of modern business.
— Richard N. Ostilling
The American Prospect - Kim Phillips-Fein
His themes are, ahem, resurrected by businessmen who seek to enumerate the most common problems in business.
Philadelphia Tribune - Richard N. Ostilling
Barton is a pioneer in public relations...by making Jesus the founder of modern business.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780899669496
  • Publisher: Buccaneer Books, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/28/1999
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,377,869
  • Product dimensions: 5.84 (w) x 8.76 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard M. Fried is professor of history at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has also written The Russians are Coming! The Russians are Coming!: Pageantry and Patriotism in Cold War America.

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Table of Contents

Part 1 Introduction by Richard M. Fried vii Part 2 How It Came to Be Written 3 Part 3 The Executive 6 Part 4 The Outdoor Man 19 Part 5 The Sociable Man 30 Part 6 His Method 44 Part 7 His Advertisements 59 Part 8 The Founder of Modern Business 75 Part 9 The Master 90

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2001

    He was man too! - A fact often overlooked.

    This is one of the best books I've ever read. It points out that Christ called Himself the Son of Man more than He ever called Himself the Son of God. It then focuses on the 'man'. It shows that He used the tools all men have and only rarely did he use his God powers. If you want to learn to be a better witness, a better Christian, and a better business person, read this book!

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