The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

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Overview

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz is the extraordinary true story of a British soldier who marched willingly into the concentration camp, Buna-Monowitz, known as Auschwitz III.
 
In the summer of 1944, Denis Avey was being held in a British POW labour camp, E715, near Auschwitz III. He had heard of the brutality meted out to the prisoners there and he was determined to ...

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The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

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Overview

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz is the extraordinary true story of a British soldier who marched willingly into the concentration camp, Buna-Monowitz, known as Auschwitz III.
 
In the summer of 1944, Denis Avey was being held in a British POW labour camp, E715, near Auschwitz III. He had heard of the brutality meted out to the prisoners there and he was determined to witness what he could.
 
He hatched a plan to swap places with a Jewish inmate and smuggled himself into his sector of the camp. He spent the night there on two occasions and experienced at first-hand the cruelty of a place where slave workers, had been sentenced to death through labor.
 
Astonishingly, he survived to witness the aftermath of the Death March where thousands of prisoners were murdered by the Nazis as the Soviet Army advanced. After his own long trek right across central Europe he was repatriated to Britain.
 
For decades he couldn't bring himself to revisit the past that haunted his dreams, but now Denis Avey feels able to tell the full story—a tale as gripping as it is moving—which offers us a unique insight into the mind of an ordinary man whose moral and physical courage are almost beyond belief.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
During WWII, British soldier Denis Avey was imprisoned at E715, a labor camp near Buna-Monowitz, the concentration camp known as Auschwitz III. While at E715, Avey decided to break out of prison and into Auschwitz to see its horrors firsthand. After disguising himself as a Jewish inmate, Avey entered Auschwitz and even witnessed the death march, in which thousands of prisoners were slaughtered in the face of advancing Soviet troops. James Langton ably narrates this audio version of Avey and Broomby’s international bestseller. Although Langton’s mellifluous tones—his voice light, fluting, and delicate—are occasionally at odds with the brutal ugliness of the tale, his narration is well paced and steady. Additionally, Langton uses the silence between sentences to punctuate the narrative, allowing those pauses to remind listeners that behind the story’s excitement and valor remained a regular man who bore witness to the horrors of the Holocaust. A Da Capo hardcover. (July)
From the Publisher
"This is a most important book, and a timely reminder of the dangers that face any society once intolerance and racism take hold." —Sir Martin Gilbert
Library Journal
Auschwitz and the horrors of war retold in this first-person account are so unspeakable that Avey only felt comfortable sharing his story at age 90. A British POW in Auschwitz, Avey befriended and traded places with another prisoner to spend two nights in the Jewish sector in order to witness the atrocities. Only a small portion of the book deals with Auschwitz, but Avey's description of life during and after wartime is priceless. Avey's message to the world: everyone must fight to correct wrong and never assume that the unthinkable will not occur where you live. Narrator James Langton covers diverse cultures, accents, and situations with great skill and compassion. His outstanding delivery enhances this moving story immeasurably. Recommended for World War II and Holocaust enthusiasts. This program should be required reading for the military and war industry.—Susan G. Baird, formerly with Oak Lawn P.L., Chicago
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781452602486
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/5/2011
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged CD
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Rob Broomby is a BBC journalist who first chronicled Denis Avey's story of breaking into the Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II.

Actor and musician James Langton, an AudioFile Earphones Award winner, has performed many voice-overs and narrated numerous audiobooks, including the international bestseller The Brotherhood of the Holy Shroud by Julia Navarro and The Demon's Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 22, 2011

    A story of PTSD and the eventaual relief found through sharing.

    While evidently from the low star ranking so far some didn't like this book I did and found myself making extra time to get back to it and read more. While no big revelations about conditions were revealed in the book it could perhaps be beter described as a book telling the story of hte PTSD impact on a combat vetran and POW of WWII. It shows how finally sharing the hidden anugish of having buddies blownup sitting right next to you and witnessing the abuse of outers can have on a person. The later part of the book telling events of recent years I found enjoyable. No this isn't a book you read with a light mood it's somber but at the same time enlightening. I found myself trying to figure out where Avery found a meaning that Frankle described in his book "Man's Search For Meaning" and gratend the British prisoners in the camp adjacent to Auschwitz didn't receive the same treatment as the ones from that camp thy still most likely needed a reason for living and Avery found that in his need to document even if just mentally the treatment the concentration camp prisoners received. Granted due to the PTSD and personal health issues he ended up keeping things bottled up inside for many decades before finally finindg some comfort in being able to relate his story. And at least one of the prisoners of Auschwitz confirmed his story many years before Avery hinself revelaed his story. If you are somone who enjoys reading WWII era historical stories then you may enjoy this book. The fighting from an enlisted mans view the capitivity and his exposure to the prisoners of Auschwitz and yes he did spend two nights inside the camp itself.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 30, 2012

    Very Interesting Book.

    This was a very good book. I highly recommend it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 19, 2011

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