The Man Who Had All the Luck

The Man Who Had All the Luck

by Arthur Miller, Christopher W. E. Bigsby
     
 

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Infused with the moral malaise of the Depression era, the drama centers on David Beeves, a man whose every obstacle to personal and professional success seems to crumble before him. But his good fortune merely serves to reveal the tragedies of those around him in greater relief, offering evidence of a capricious God or, worse, a godless, arbitrary universe. David's…  See more details below

Overview

Infused with the moral malaise of the Depression era, the drama centers on David Beeves, a man whose every obstacle to personal and professional success seems to crumble before him. But his good fortune merely serves to reveal the tragedies of those around him in greater relief, offering evidence of a capricious God or, worse, a godless, arbitrary universe. David's journey toward fulfillment becomes a nightmare of existential doubts, a desperate grasp for reason in a cosmos seemingly devoid of any, and a struggle that will take him to the brink of madness.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Miller's play tanked when hitting the stage in 1944 and has never been listed among his great works. Yet it has the early earmarks of his later triumphs and was a step toward his career as a great dramatist. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440650864
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/25/2004
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
549,352
File size:
140 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Arthur Miller (1915-2005) was born in New York City and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock (1980). He also wrote two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. His later work included a memoir, Timebends (1987); the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1994), and Mr. Peter's Connections (1999); Echoes Down the Corridor: Collected Essays, 1944–2000; and On Politics and the Art of Acting (2001). He twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Miller was the recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the Prince of Asturias Award for Letters in 2002, and the Jerusalem Prize in 2003.

Christopher Bigsby is a professor of American Studies at the University of East Anglia. He edited the Penguin Classics editions of Miller's The CrucibleDeath of a Salesman, and All My Sons.

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