The Man Who Killed the Deer

The Man Who Killed the Deer

5.0 1
by Frank Waters
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The story of Martiniano, the man who killed the deer, is a timeless story of Pueblo Indian sin and redemption, and of the conflict between Indian and white laws; written with a poetically charged beauty of style, a purity of conception, and a thorough understanding of Indian values.

Overview

The story of Martiniano, the man who killed the deer, is a timeless story of Pueblo Indian sin and redemption, and of the conflict between Indian and white laws; written with a poetically charged beauty of style, a purity of conception, and a thorough understanding of Indian values.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“By far the finest novel of American Indian life I have ever read.”
Saturday Review of Literature

“[Waters's] long and wide experience… has given him an insight to the ways of the Indian, perhaps not exceeded by any other novelist.”
Los Angeles Times

“A rich fusion of myth and reality, both a detailed rendering of Pueblo Indian rituals, ceremonies and beliefs and an account of the Indians' political struggle to get back their ancestral lands.”
Westways

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671555023
Publisher:
Pocket Books
Publication date:
07/01/1971
Edition description:
REISSUE
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
4.22(w) x 6.78(h) x 0.63(d)

What People are saying about this

Stephen Vincent Benet
This is a very beautiful book -- perhaps the best book that has yet been written about the American Indian....It stands by itself.

Meet the Author


Frank Waters, (1902–1995), is the finest chronicler, in both fiction and non-fiction, of the vast American Southwest. He writes out of long and close association with the American Indian and with the Spanish-American, and with deep understanding of their cultures.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Man Who Killed the Deer 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a journey. A journey that, while illuminating the Native American struggles (internal as well as external), also sheds light on the soul's universal journey from empty and fragmented to full and whole.