MAN WHO MADE IRELAND: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF MINOPAE

MAN WHO MADE IRELAND: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF MINOPAE

by Tim Pat Coogan
     
 

"Like Prometheus, Collins stole fire. Like Prometheus, he paid for his feat and much of what he set about doing remains undone. But his name burns brightly wherever the Irish meet. Michael Collins was the man who made Ireland possible." So begins Tim Pat Coogan in this highly-acclaimed biography that sat atop the best-seller lists of England and Ireland, and is now…  See more details below

Overview

"Like Prometheus, Collins stole fire. Like Prometheus, he paid for his feat and much of what he set about doing remains undone. But his name burns brightly wherever the Irish meet. Michael Collins was the man who made Ireland possible." So begins Tim Pat Coogan in this highly-acclaimed biography that sat atop the best-seller lists of England and Ireland, and is now published in the U.S. for the first time. Michael Collins, affectionately known as "The Big Fellow" was just thirty-one years of age when on the morning of October 11, 1921, he sat down to negotiate Irish independence with one of the most formidable political teams that England ever assembled. Facing him were David Lloyd George, Lord Birkenhead, Austin Chamberlain, and Winston Churchill. The ensuing treaty of December 6 did not yield the unbroken island nation Collins had hoped for, but he prophetically termed it a "stepping stone" to today's Irish Republic. But, Coogan asserts, "all the other stepping stones to the tragedy of today's Northern Ireland situation were part of that negotiation too. In a very real sense Collins' premature death was caused by the forces that still rage about the North-eastern corner of the land." Before his remarkable debut in international diplomacy, Michael Collins had been rightly celebrated as the brains and driving force behind a daring strategy of guerilla warfare. It was Collins who founded the Irish Army and became its first Commander in-Chief, who ingeniously smashed the British Army's intelligence network in Dublin and who became known as "the man they couldn't catch." The Man Who Made Ireland takes in the full sweep of Irish history as it was lived by all the major protagonists of Collins' lifetime until his assassination in 1922, towards the end of the Irish Civil War. If we hope to understand today's tragedies, and avert others like them, it is essential to know and learn from the story of Michael Collins.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A model for other revolutionaries worldwide, Michael Collins (1891-1922) took center stage in Irish history after the Easter Rebellion of 1916. This definitive biography by the former editor of the daily Irish Press traces the political trajectory of the ``Big Fellow,'' as the handsome charismatic Collins was known. As the key figure in the Irish Republican Army's war of independence of 1919-1921, Collins focused on intelligence and counterintelligence activities, using ruthless efficiency to destroy the British secret service network in Dublin. He led the Irish delegation in negotiating the treaty with Great Britain that brought southern Ireland commonwealth recognition. But his failure to wrest full republic status in the negotiations tore the revolutionary movement asunder; angered and disappointed dissidents rallied around Eamon DeValera on a path that led to bitter civil war. While in his native Cork hoping to reconcile with anti-treaty former comrades, Collins was killed by a partisan. Although firmly rooted in facts, Coogan's stirring, frankly biased (i.e., anti-DeValera) study also deals in rumor: Was Collins in New York, disguised as a priest, in 1914? Was Parnell deputy Tim Healy a British mole as early as 1882? Photos. Author tour. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Coogan, an old hand in writing on modern Ireland ( Ireland Since the Rising , LJ 6/1/66), has given us a sympathetic, perceptive biography of Michael Collins. Drawing on an impressive array of manuscript and printed sources, he brings alive the checkered, controversial career of a man who played a key role in founding the Irish Republican Army, served as its first commander-in-chief, and helped to create the Republic of Ireland. Coogan offers one of the finest treatments of this watershed in British history. His study is essential for all collections supporting British studies.-- Jim Casada, Winthrop Coll . , Rock Hill, S . C .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781879373716
Publisher:
Rinehart, Roberts Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

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