Overview

In 1782, when Luke Howard was ten, he began keeping a weather journal to describe what he saw in the sky?he especially loved to watch the clouds. As an adult, Luke wanted to classify clouds, though many others had failed at this.
?This combination biography and science text is a fascinating look at one man?s interest in weather.? ?Kirkus Reviews

?An attractive combination of biographical narrative and weather...
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Overview

In 1782, when Luke Howard was ten, he began keeping a weather journal to describe what he saw in the sky—he especially loved to watch the clouds. As an adult, Luke wanted to classify clouds, though many others had failed at this.
”This combination biography and science text is a fascinating look at one man’s interest in weather.” —Kirkus Reviews

“An attractive combination of biographical narrative and weather science.” —BooklistJoan Holub is the author and/or illustrator of over one hundred thirty books for children, including Apple Countdown and Wagons Ho! She is also the author of the acclaimed Goddess Girls series (coauthored with Suzanne Williams), which includes twelve titles such as Athena the BrainMedusa the Mean, and Aphrodite the Diva.    

Joan Holub is the author and/or illustrator of over one hundred thirty books for children, including Apple Countdown and Wagons Ho! She is also the author of the acclaimed Goddess Girls series (coauthored with Suzanne Williams), which includes twelve titles such as Athena the Brain, Medusa the Mean, and Aphrodite the Diva.  

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
It is fortunate for us that as a boy Luke Howard could be counted on to have his "head in the clouds." The English-born scientist's fascination with weather and clouds continued into adulthood, where his keen observations resulted in a scientific cloud-naming system. Howard kept meticulous recordings of weather patterns and painted detailed watercolors of cloud formations. He patterned his system on Linnaeus' use of Latin in naming plants, and he introduced the system in the Encyclopedia Americana in the early 1800s. A quiet and humble man, he earned his living as a chemist although he gave lectures on weather and continued to study his beloved sky until his death at age ninety-one. Simple text and warm watercolor illustrations bring to light the important work of this little-known man. Included are reproductions of Howard's original paintings of clouds, balanced with photos of each of the ten basic clouds. The weather journal of a modern child interrupts the flow of the narrative and might better have been appended at the end. There is no index but a comprehensive bibliography of adult's and children's titles is included. Combine this with Tomie dePaola's The Cloud Book and Thomas Locker's Cloud Dance for a unit about weather and clouds.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Readers will learn quite a bit about the 10 classifications of clouds from this picture-book biography of 18th-century English meteorologist Luke Howard. Historical portraits and reproductions of his original painted cloud studies are mixed in with Billin-Frye's attractive ink-and-watercolor cartoons. The text also contains entries in a weather journal created by a present-day student doing a science project, which interrupts the narrative flow of the biography and cloud information. Weather jokes at the bottom of the entries are distracting and seem out of place. Overall, though, this book can be used to supplement materials on cloud classification or to introduce a little-known scientist.-Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This combination biography and science text is a fascinating look at one man's interest in weather. Luke Howard began keeping a weather journal at the age of ten. Always fascinated with clouds, studying the weather became a lifelong hobby. Howard created a system for naming the different cloud types that is the basis for our cloud names today. Information about Howard's time period puts his life and experiences in perspetive for young readers. Scattered throughout the text are excerpts from an elementary school student's own weather journal. These are not just temperature recordings-Grace explains the weather, including how rain and snow form, what fog is and how clouds can be used to predict weather. Budding meteorologists can use her journal as a template for their own, and will find her project ideas helpful. Billin-Frye's watercolors bring the past to life. Actual paintings by Howard and photos of the cloud types, along with a diagram, are included. An excellent combination of history and science, sure to spark the interest of future meteorologists. (Nonfiction. 7-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781480489226
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 2/25/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Edition description: Digital Original
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 753,373
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • File size: 20 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Joan Holub is the author and/or illustrator of over one hundred thirty books for children, including Apple Countdown and Wagons Ho! She is also the author of the acclaimed Goddess Girls series (coauthored with Suzanne Williams), which includes twelve titles such as Athena the Brain, Medusa the Mean, and Aphrodite the Diva.  
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