The Man Without a Country

( 2 )

Overview

The Man without a Country
By Edward E. Hale

Introduction

Love of country is a sentiment so universal that it is only on such rare occasions as called this book into being that there is any need of discussing it or justifying it. There is a perfectly absurd statement by Charles Kingsley, in the preface to one of his books, written fifty years ago, in which he says that, while ...

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The Man Without a Country

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Overview

The Man without a Country
By Edward E. Hale

Introduction

Love of country is a sentiment so universal that it is only on such rare occasions as called this book into being that there is any need of discussing it or justifying it. There is a perfectly absurd statement by Charles Kingsley, in the preface to one of his books, written fifty years ago, in which he says that, while there can be loyalty to a king or a queen, there cannot be loyalty to one's country.

This story of Philip Nolan was written in the darkest period of the Civil War, to show what love of country is. There were persons then who thought that if their advice had been taken there need have been no Civil War. There were persons whose every-day pursuits were greatly deranged by the Civil War. It proved that the lesson was a lesson gladly received. I have had letters from seamen who read it as they were lying in our blockade squadrons off the mouths of Southern harbors. I have had letters from men who read it soon after the Vicksburg campaign. And in other ways I have had many illustrations of its having been of use in what I have a right to call the darkest period of the Republic.

To-day we are not in the darkest period of the Republic.

This nation never wishes to make war. Our whole policy is a policy of peace, and peace is the protection of the Christian civilization to which we are pledged. It is always desirable to teach young men and young women, and old men and old women, and all sorts of people, to understand what the country is. It is a Being. The LORD, God of nations, has called it into existence, and has placed it here with certain duties in defence of the civilization of the world.

It was the intention of this parable, which describes the life of one man who tried to separate himself from his country, to show how terrible was his mistake.

It does not need now that a man should curse the United States, as Philip Nolan did, or that he should say he hopes he may never hear her name again, to make it desirable for him to consider the lessons which are involved in the parable of his life. Any man is "without a country who, by his sneers, or by looking backward, or by revealing his country's secrets to her enemy, checks for one hour the movements which lead to peace among the nations of the world, or weakens the arm of the nation in her determination to secure justice between man and man, and in general to secure the larger life of her people." He has not damned the United States in a spoken oath...

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Windham Press is committed to bringing the lost cultural heritage of ages past into the 21st century through high-quality reproductions of original, classic printed works at affordable prices.

This book has been carefully crafted to utilize the original images of antique books rather than error-prone OCR text. This also preserves the work of the original typesetters of these classics, unknown craftsmen who laid out the text, often by hand, of each and every page you will read. Their subtle art involving judgment and interaction with the text is in many ways superior and more human than the mechanical methods utilized today, and gave each book a unique, hand-crafted feel in its text that connected the reader organically to the art of bindery and book-making.

We think these benefits are worth the occasional imperfection resulting from the age of these books at the time of scanning, and their vintage feel provides a connection to the past that goes beyond the mere words of the text.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781495384950
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 1/30/2014
  • Pages: 36
  • Sales rank: 550,666
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.07 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward Everett Hale (1822 1909) was an American author, historian and Unitarian clergyman. He was a child prodigy who exhibited extraordinary literary skills and at age thirteen was enrolled at Harvard University where he graduated second in his class. Hale would go on to write for a variety of publications and periodicals throughout his lifetime.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 23, 2010

    A Patriotic Short Story

    The Man Without a Country, is an interesting short story. It was written during the middle of the Civil War in 1863 and tells the story of a young man, Philip Nolan, who in the early days of the 1800's in a moment of bravery and bravado, renounced the United States and all that was his country. Making good on his wish a judge ordered him to be passed from ship to ship, never setting his foot on United States soil again, and also never hearing the least bit of news from his country. For 56 years Nolan lived this way, early on, realizing the mistake of his youth and taking young sailors under his guidance and telling them to cherish the country which they have. He pines to be reunited with the United States but pride and acceptance of his wrong doing resigns himself to his punishment, secretly building a shrine to his country and in his own words, loved Her more than any other, but deserved Her less than any other. A very short read and an interesting twist. Would definitely recommend to young adults and adults alike just for its inspiration that it provides.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2011

    Junk

    This is nothing but a jumbled mess. It appears that there was more interest in advertising google than reproducing the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 23, 2011

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    Posted December 3, 2011

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    Posted February 18, 2011

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    Posted July 13, 2011

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    Posted December 13, 2009

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 6 Customer Reviews

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