Manabozho's Gifts: Three Chippewa Tales

Manabozho's Gifts: Three Chippewa Tales

by Jacqueline Dembar Greene, Jennifer Hewitson
     
 

Meet legendary hero Manabozho in these three skillful retellings of legends important to the Chippewa way of life. "Greene's retellings have quiet dignity. The 23 attractive, full- and half-page black-ink woodcuts lend additional appeal." -- School Library Journal See more details below

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Overview

Meet legendary hero Manabozho in these three skillful retellings of legends important to the Chippewa way of life. "Greene's retellings have quiet dignity. The 23 attractive, full- and half-page black-ink woodcuts lend additional appeal." -- School Library Journal

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Three legends from the Chippewa, also known as the Ojibway, that expose readers to classic tales and a mythic character. Manabozho is a shape-shifting figure known to many tribes. He is more than a man but less than a god, using his powers to benefit the people. In the first selection, he introduces fire to the tribe. ``How Manabozho Found Rice'' preserves the legend of one of the Chippewa's most sacred gifts-wild rice from the northern lakes of their home. The final story, ``How Manabozho Saved the Rose,'' teaches an ecology lesson. Greene's retellings have quiet dignity. The 23 attractive, full-and half-page, black-ink woodcuts lend additional appeal. The author's foreword, notes, suggestions for further reading, and bibliography ground readers in the Manabozho archetype, plus establish her sources. Ironically, her list of recommended readings is shorter and less comprehensive than the list in a book that she cites-Gordon Regguinti's The Sacred Harvest (Lerner, 1992).-Jacqueline Elsner, Athens Regional Library, GA
Linda Ward-Callaghan
nger for reading aloud. Incorporating elements from Algonquin, Menominee, and Ojibwa legends, Greene introduces the shape-shifter hero Manabozho, known as Nanbozho, Hiawatha, or Manabush in similar tales. The philosophy of living in harmony with nature that is central to Manabozho's adventures combines the appeal of "pourquoi" tales, magic, and talking animals. In these three stories, Manabozho becomes a rabbit to bring fire to his people, learns to cultivate wild rice during a vision quest, and restores the balance of nature when the animals ignore the disappearing wild rose. Complemented by dramatic black-and-white stylized illustrations, reminiscent of scratchboard or woodcuts, Greene's adaptations are accessible to independent readers yet contain evocative phrasing that marks them as good read-alouds for any age group. The bibliography and source notes provide both young and adult readers with material to extend their study of Manabozho.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395692516
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/24/1994
Pages:
42
Product dimensions:
6.33(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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