Management Information Systems / Edition 10

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Overview

Management Information Systems is recognized for logical organization and clear descriptions. Focusing on the role of managers within an organization, the volume emphasizes the development of computer-based Information Systems to support an organization's objectives and strategic plans. Focusing on the Systems Concepts, the Systems Approach is implemented throughout the text.

The volume covers essential concepts such as using information technology to engage in electronic commerce, and information resources such as database management systems, information security, ethical implications of information technology and decision support systems with projects to challenge users at all levels of competence.

For those involved in Management Information Systems.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This textbook introduces the use of computer systems to produce and organize information as a tool for business management. The eighth edition adds a chapter that addresses business computing from an organization-wide perspective. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131889187
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 10
  • Pages: 480
  • Product dimensions: 7.95 (w) x 9.84 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

A textbook consists of two key ingredients—the selection of topics and their organization. These ingredients have always received top priority in Management Information Systems; but because of the dynamic nature of the computer field, the task becomes more difficult with successive editions. Each year there are numerous new topics, and decisions must be made concerning where to put them and what old topics, if any, to discard.

Although these can be tough decisions, two situations make the job easier. First, there are many more sources of material today than there were in the past. When the first edition of Management Information Systems was published in 1979, one good reference on a topic was considered a gold mine. Fortunately, that situation has changed. Today there are many excellent sources for each topic, making it possible to provide complete descriptions from several points of view.

The second situation that simplifies the job of writing an MIS text is the fact that the underlying theory does not change that much. The theory provides the framework for the technology and is relatively stable. So, when someone writes a new edition, it is not like starting out with a clean slate, wondering what the first word should be.

Management Information Systems has always enjoyed a strong brand loyalty among the instructors who adopt and use it. The main reason is that students like it. In their course evaluations, students consistently give the text a good rating, their comments indicating that they like the logical organization and the clear descriptions. Supporting these two features is the strongtheoretical base.

  • Logical Textbook Organization: You will find this eighth edition well organized, with the topics flowing logically within each part and each chapter. Terms are not used in a chapter without first defining them.
  • Thorough Explanations: This edition upholds its tradition of complete coverage of each topic that is introduced. Emphasis has never been on the number of topics covered but, rather, on the number covered well.
  • Solid Theoretical Base: The framework for the text consists of approximately 400 illustrations in the form of schematic diagrams, or models. Some of the models were created over the years by experts in the field, and their contributions are acknowledged. Most, however, are unique to this text. The diagrams provide a road map, making it easier to learn the material so that students can apply it in their careers.

These three features—good organization, thorough explanations, and a solid theoretical base—give students an advantage in learning about the complex and changing field of business computing.

A Management Orientation

Like the previous editions, the eighth edition views computer use through the eyes of the manager. The management orientation has always seemed appropriate, but the case is even stronger today with so many managers personally using their computers to produce information.

When students later become managers, they will have many opportunities to apply the text material. Perhaps, however, they are primarily interested in computers and want to become computer specialists. As systems analysts, network specialists, or database administrators, they will apply the material as they work with managers in developing managerial systems. Of course, before long they may become managers themselves in the information systems area. So, regardless of the position of the computer specialist in the organization, he or she will benefit from seeing problems from management's point of view. This text will give students that perspective.

New to This Edition

WEBSITE SUPPORT: The Prentice Hall Companion Website for the Eighth Edition features new projects, two for each chapter of the text, within the Interactive Study Guide. The student side of. the site provides the projects and instructions for completing them. The instructor side of the site' contains the projects, the project answers, and materials for helping students having difficulty with the projects.

These new Companion Website projects are designed to reinforce concepts presented in the' chapter. Students also derive skills in the use of technology as they solve the projects. Project exercises incorporate spreadsheets, database queries and reports, word processing, and web page development into their design. The book's Internet address is: ...

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Table of Contents

I: Essential Concepts

1. Introduction to Information Systems

2. Information Systems for Competitive Advantage

3. Using Information Technology to Engage in Electronic Commerce

4. System Users and Developers

II. Information Resources

5. Computing and Communications Resources

6. Database Management Systems

7. Systems Development

8. Information in Action

III. Managing Information and Technology

9. Information Security

10. Ethical Implications of Information Technology

11. Decision Support Systems

HANDS-ON PROJECTS

1. Everyday Technology Skills

2. Web/HTML Project Using Microsoft FrontPage

3. Web/HTML Project Using Notepad

4. Web/HTML Student Survey

5. Web/HTML Book Purchase

6. Spreadsheet Basics

7. Spreadsheets with Data Capture - Vacation Choice

8. Spreadsheets with Data Capture - Movie Ticket Purchase

9. Database Forms and Reports

10. Database Queries - Customer Database

11. Database Queries - Inventory Database

12. Reports Based on Queries

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Preface

Preface

A textbook consists of two key ingredients—the selection of topics and their organization. These ingredients have always received top priority in Management Information Systems; but because of the dynamic nature of the computer field, the task becomes more difficult with successive editions. Each year there are numerous new topics, and decisions must be made concerning where to put them and what old topics, if any, to discard.

Although these can be tough decisions, two situations make the job easier. First, there are many more sources of material today than there were in the past. When the first edition of Management Information Systems was published in 1979, one good reference on a topic was considered a gold mine. Fortunately, that situation has changed. Today there are many excellent sources for each topic, making it possible to provide complete descriptions from several points of view.

The second situation that simplifies the job of writing an MIS text is the fact that the underlying theory does not change that much. The theory provides the framework for the technology and is relatively stable. So, when someone writes a new edition, it is not like starting out with a clean slate, wondering what the first word should be.

Management Information Systems has always enjoyed a strong brand loyalty among the instructors who adopt and use it. The main reason is that students like it. In their course evaluations, students consistently give the text a good rating, their comments indicating that they like the logical organization and the clear descriptions. Supporting these two features is the strongtheoretical base.

  • Logical Textbook Organization: You will find this eighth edition well organized, with the topics flowing logically within each part and each chapter. Terms are not used in a chapter without first defining them.
  • Thorough Explanations: This edition upholds its tradition of complete coverage of each topic that is introduced. Emphasis has never been on the number of topics covered but, rather, on the number covered well.
  • Solid Theoretical Base: The framework for the text consists of approximately 400 illustrations in the form of schematic diagrams, or models. Some of the models were created over the years by experts in the field, and their contributions are acknowledged. Most, however, are unique to this text. The diagrams provide a road map, making it easier to learn the material so that students can apply it in their careers.

These three features—good organization, thorough explanations, and a solid theoretical base—give students an advantage in learning about the complex and changing field of business computing.

A Management Orientation

Like the previous editions, the eighth edition views computer use through the eyes of the manager. The management orientation has always seemed appropriate, but the case is even stronger today with so many managers personally using their computers to produce information.

When students later become managers, they will have many opportunities to apply the text material. Perhaps, however, they are primarily interested in computers and want to become computer specialists. As systems analysts, network specialists, or database administrators, they will apply the material as they work with managers in developing managerial systems. Of course, before long they may become managers themselves in the information systems area. So, regardless of the position of the computer specialist in the organization, he or she will benefit from seeing problems from management's point of view. This text will give students that perspective.

New to This Edition

WEBSITE SUPPORT: The Prentice Hall Companion Website for the Eighth Edition features new projects, two for each chapter of the text, within the Interactive Study Guide. The student side of. the site provides the projects and instructions for completing them. The instructor side of the site' contains the projects, the project answers, and materials for helping students having difficulty with the projects.

These new Companion Website projects are designed to reinforce concepts presented in the' chapter. Students also derive skills in the use of technology as they solve the projects. Project exercises incorporate spreadsheets, database queries and reports, word processing, and web page development into their design. The book's Internet address is: http://www.prenhall.com/mcleod

NEW AND UPDATED CHAPTERS: This edition includes one completely new chapter—Chapter 15, Enterprise Information Systems. The textbook has always given strong attention to such organizational information systems as executive information systems and marketing information systems, and that emphasis is continued. Chapter 15 serves to address business computing from an organization-wide perspective—an approach that is currently receiving much attention on a global scale.

In addition to this new chapter, many substantive changes have been made to other chapters. Part Three, which covers computer technology, has been completely rewritten. Chapter 8, Fundamentals of Computer Processing, has been updated with current hardware and software examples. Chapter 9, The Database and Database Management System, and Chapter 10, Data Communications, have also been completely revised.

All of these changes serve to keep the text up-to-date in areas of technology and methodology.

Boxed Inserts

All chapters contain a boxed insert entitled "Highlights in MIS" that relates the chapter mated to the use of information technology in business and industrial organizations. In essence, these inserts describe how firms have been both successful and unsuccessful in applying the principles of information management.

Examples of Applying the Systems Approach

Chapter 6 describes the basic problem-solving methodology—the systems approach. From that point on, each chapter includes a section called "Applying the Systems Approach," which discusses how this approach can be applied to the chapter material. These sections continue the systems focus long after the fundamentals are presented early in the text.

Updated Appendixes

In addition to the chapters, there are five appendixes. Two deal with the tools of systems development data and process modeling. These topics are of most interest to information specialist but can have value to users engaged in end-user computing.

Data modeling is accomplished by using entity-relationship diagrams and data dictionaries to document the firm's data. Process modeling is accomplished by using data flow diagrams and structured English.

Three additional appendixes deal with organizational information systems-manufacturing information systems, financial information systems, and human resources information systems' These three appendixes complete the coverage of computer use by the major business areas.

Modular Organization of the Chapters

The text is divided into six parts.

Part One: The Computer as an Organizational Information – System Part One consists of five chapters and provides the course foundation. Regardless of the course approach, Chapters 1, 2, and 3-Introduction to the Computer-Based Information System, Using Information Technology for Competitive Advantage, and Using Information Technology to Engage in Electronic Commerce-should always be covered first. They capture the essence of contemporary computer use in business.

The next two chapters—chapter 4, Computer Use in an International Marketplace; and chapter 5, Ethical Implications of Information Technology—should be included in the course foundation when the text is used in an introduction to computing course required of all business majors.

Part Two: Systems Methodologies – With the foundation laid, the instructor can take the remaining parts in any order, depending on the emphasis desired. Part Two consists of two chapters: chapter 6, Systems Concepts; and chapter 7, System Life Cycle Methodologies. Chapter 6 explains business operations in systems terms and provides the framework for understanding how managers and information specialists solve problems. Chapter 7 describes the frameworks that have been devised to guide users and information specialists in the process of systems development. This part is included in a course where the instructor recognizes the value of a solid theoretical foundation. Such an approach would be especially appropriate when the course is required of all information systems majors.

Part Three: The Computer as a Problem-Solving Tool – Part Three is appropriate when the course is to include computing technology. The instructor selects such an approach when the students' previous exposure to computing has been limited primarily to personal computers and prewritten software and when students need a broader foundation in technology. Chapters 8,, 9, and 10—Fundamentals of Computer Processing, The Database and Database Management System, and Data Communications—provide this needed foundation.

Part Four: The Computer-Based Information System – This part contains four chapters, each describing a major business computing application area. All of the areas are collectively called the computer-based information system, or CBIS. The CBIS subsystems are covered by chapters 11 through 14-The Accounting Information System, The Management Information System, Decision Support Systems, and The Virtual Office. The chapter on decision support systems also includes coverage of knowledge-based systems. Part Four should be included in every course approach because it provides an overview of all of the ways that the computer is being used to solve business problems.

Part Five: Organizational Information Systems – This part expands on the management information system chapter to describe how the MIS concept has been applied to subsets of the organization. Chapter 15, Enterprise Information Systems, provides a corporate-wide umbrella for computer applications; Chapter 16, Executive Information Systems, explains computer use at the top organizational level. The other chapters explain computer use in two major functional areas: chapter 17, Marketing Information Systems; and Chapter 18, Information Resources Information Systems.

Chapter 18 is the concluding chapter of the text and describes the responsibilities of the chief information officer (CIO) in relation to such topics as management of a global information network, information security, and information quality. This chapter prepares students majoring in information systems for management responsibility, which will begin just a few years after graduation in the form of project leadership.

This concluding part of the text, Part Five, on organizational information systems has always been one of the instructors' and students' favorites, and some or all of the chapters can be included depending on the desired emphasis.

Realistically, the text includes more material than can be covered in a single semester. This is especially true when the course includes some type of experiential activity, such as a term project or solution of case problems. The underlying philosophy of the text has always been one of allowing the instructor to "pick and choose." The instructor can assemble the ingredients to achieve just the right course emphasis.

Proven Chapter Pedagogy

Each chapter begins with Learning Objectives and an Introduction, and ends with Key Terms, Key Concepts, Questions, Topics for Discussion, Problems (when appropriate), and one or two Case Problems. The concepts and discussion topics focus attention on the important chapter elements. The questions and problems test knowledge and allow students to apply the material in a creative way.

Strong Ties to the Literature

Footnotes throughout the text, combined with an end-of-book bibliography arranged by chapter, tie the material to the rich MIS literature. Many references are "classics" that have withstood the test of time. Other references shed light on applications that are just now emerging. Therefore, what is given is not only a look at the field today but an appreciation for how this point was reached, and an idea of what is to come.

A Complete Package

A complete set of materials is available that will assist students and instructors in accomplishing course objectives.

Materials to Help the Student

  • Companion Website: www.prenhall.com/mcleod – The Eighth Edition Website features a comprehensive Interactive Study Guide for students and a password protected download area for instructors. The Interactive Study Guide includes new chapter projects, multiple choice and true/false questions, monthly technology updates, and downloadable PowerPoint Presentations.
  • Internet Links – Throughout the text are Website addresses where related material can be obtained from the World Wide Web. These Web locations provide valuable information that, when used with the text material, provide a complete, up-to-date coverage of business computing.
  • Pricing Model – The pricing model is a mathematical model that allows the student to make a set of major decisions and see the effect on a firm's profitability. The model gives first-hand experience in using the computer as a decision support system.

Materials to Help the Instructor

  • PowerPoint Presentations – Color visual aids, in Microsoft PowerPoint, make it easy for the instructor to supplement classroom lectures and discussions with professional graphics. The visuals include bulleted items that provide a lecture outline, plus key figures and tables from the text. The PowerPoint Presentations are available from the text Website at www.prenhall.com/mcleod.
  • Instructor's Manual (IM) and Test Item File (TIF) – This edition features the IM and TIF all under one cover. Written by the authors, the IM includes suggestions for designing the course and presenting the material. Each chapter is supported by answers to end-of-chapter questions and problems, and suggestions concerning the discussion topics and cases. The IM also includes suggestions for integrating the appendix material and experiential activities into the course. The test bank, also written by the authors, consists of true-false and multiple-choice questions, plus a 10-point miniquiz for each chapter. ISBN 013-019736-X.
  • Prentice Hall Test Manager – The computer version of the test bank includes the same questions as the paperback version of the test bank. The Prentice Hall Test Manager runs in Windows and enables the instructor to select questions and create customized exams. ISBN 013-019737-8
  • PH MIS Video Series – A videocassette covering various topics in MIS is available free . to adopters of this textbook. This video contains custom clips created exclusively for Prentice Hall and features the following companies: Andersen Consulting, Land's End, Lotus Development Corporation, Oracle Corporation, and The Pillsbury Company. ISBN 013-027199-3
  • Companion Website:www.prenhall.com/mcleod – The password protected Instructor's area contains the Instructor's Manual and additional teaching resources.

This complete set of materials provides both students and instructors with a variety of options in terms of course support.

Acknowledgments

A TEAM EFFORT: Throughout the text the authors frequently use the term "we." The authors are always referring to themselves but also to many people who have made valuable contributions. Playing key roles have been the people at Prentice Hall, among them David Alexander, Senior Acquisitions Editor; Michael Reynolds, Production Editor; Sondra Greenfield, Managing Editor-Production; Paul Smolenski, Manufacturing Supervisor; Lisa Babin, Manufacturing Buyer; Lori Cerreto, Associate Editor; Kris King, Senior Marketing Manager; Nancy Welcher, Media Project Manager; Erika Rusnak, Editorial Assistant.

At other times when the authors say "we," they are including their students. Over the years have received much constructive feedback from our students. In fact, there are several points ~h the book where the material has been influenced by the students' suggestions or has come directly from them. For example, the inclusion of the internal auditing input subsystem for the financial information system in Appendix D was suggested by Debra Dusek, a student at Texas 8t M. The end result of long-term classroom use is a text that reflects not only what students need to learn but what they recognize as being important.

Even though we have received much help along the way, we alone are responsible for the many in which the material is presented. At times, we were advised to do one thing and elected to do other. Therefore, any shortcomings are our own.

— Raymond McLeod, Jr.
Austin, Texas
— George P Schell
Wilmington, North Carolina

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    A Textbook Library Keeper for future reference

    The best and easy to read and understand, especially for the technological context. The projects were easy to do and understand, as each gave an example with in depth explanation.

    Would highly recommend even if your major is not IT

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