Management of Defense Acquisition Projects

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Overview

Defense acquisition projects cost billions of taxpayer dollars each year. These huge investments, coupled with seemingly perennial criticisms of waste and mismanagement, point out the need for a clearly written guide to the myriad functions and issues involved in defense acquisition management. This book, written for both students and practitioners, enables the reader to understand the broad range of disciplines and activities that must be integrated in order to achieve successful acquisition outcomes.

Written by academics and practitioners from the Naval Postgraduate School, the book provides a basic overview of each functional area that supports defense acquisition projects as well as its application to those projects. These functional areas include systems engineering, financial management, contract management, test and evaluation, production management, and logistics and sustainment. The book also highlights significant issues such as organizational considerations, the defense industrial base, and acquisition workforce issues. Learning objectives are stated at the beginning of each chapter and study questions are provided at the end of each chapter.

It is written in a manner that will withstand the many DOD policy changes that are often associated with defense acquisition programs, giving the book a long and enduring shelf life.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781563479502
  • Publisher: American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics
  • Publication date: 9/19/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 292
  • Sales rank: 475,108
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Rendon is Senior Lecturer of Acquisition Management, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. He has earned BBA, MBA, and DBA degrees as well as CPCM, C.P.M. and PMP certifications. He was recognized with the USAF Outstanding Officer in Contracting Award and the National Contract Management Association National Education Award and the NCMA Outstanding Fellow Award. Author of numerous publications in the fields of contract management, supply management, and project management, Dr. Rendon's publications also include U. S. Military Program Management: Lessons Learned & Best Practices (2007), and Contract Management Organizational Assessment Tools (2005).



Dr. Snider is Associate Professor of Public Administration and Management, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, at the Naval Postgraduate School. He earned a B.S. from the United States Military Academy, M.S. in Operations Research from the Naval Postgraduate School, and Ph.D. in Public Administration and Public Affairs from Virginia Tech. Author of numerous publications in the fields of acquisition, public administration, and project management, he received the Khi V. Thai Research Scholar of the Year Award at the 2008 National Institute of Governmental Purchasing Annual Forum.

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Table of Contents


Preface xiii Chapter 1 Project-Management Concepts Rene G. Rendon Keith F. Snider 1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Definition of a Project 2
1.3 Characteristics of a Project 2
1.4 The Triple Constraint 3
1.5 Projects Compared to Routine Operations 5
1.6 Project Management Compared to Other Disciplines 5
1.7 Interdisciplinary Nature of Project Management 6
1.8 Project Life Cycle 8
1.9 Life Cycle for Defense Acquisition Projects 8
1.10 Complexity of Defense Acquisition Projects 13
1.11 Conclusion 15 References 15 Study Questions 16 Chapter 2 Defense Acquisition's Public Policy Imprint Keith F. Snider 17
2.1 Introduction 17
2.2 Policy and Politics 18
2.3 Acquisition Reform Imperative 20
2.4 Policy Makers 20
2.5 Policy Origins 24
2.6 Policy Expressions 25
2.7 Important Acquisition Policy Areas 30
2.8 Conclusion 33 References 34 Study Questions 34 Chapter 3 Initiating Defense Acquisition Projects Keith F. Snider 35
3.1 Introduction 35
3.2 Need Development 36
3.3 Requirements Management Through the Project Life Cycle 38
3.4 Science and Technology in Acquisition Projects 40
3.5 Technology Demonstrations 41
3.6 Conclusion 42 References 42 Study Questions 43 Chapter 4 Systems Engineering Thomas V. Huynh Keith F. Snider 45
4.1 Introduction 46
4.2 Value of Systems Engineering in Defense Systems Acquisition 46
4.3 Systems and Systems Engineering 48
4.4 Systems-Engineering Process-Overview 48
4.5 Systems Engineering in the Project Life Cycle 56
4.6 Systems of Systems 57
4.7 Open Systems 59
4.8 Conclusion 60 References 60 Study Questions 61 Chapter 5 Software Project Management John S. Osmundson 63
5.1Introduction 63
5.2 Importance of Software Project Management 64
5.3 Challenges of Software Project Management 66
5.4 Software Standards, CMM, and Life-Cycle Models 69
5.5 Estimation and Planning 75
5.6 Monitoring, Metrics, and Quality Assurance 76
5.7 Configuration Management, Testing, and Maintenance 78
5.8 Commercial Off-the-Shelf Software and Software Reuse 80
5.9 Conclusion 82
5.10 Additional Resources 82 References 82 Study Questions 83 Chapter 6 Logistics and Sustainment Brad Naegle 85
6.1 Introduction: Logistics as Performance 85
6.2 Design for Logistics Performance 94
6.3 Advanced Logistics Concepts 104
6.4 Conclusion 107 References 107 Study Questions 108 Chapter 7 Test and Evaluation Management Brad Naegle Keith F. Snider 109
7.1 Introduction 109
7.2 Purposes of T&E 110
7.3 Types of T&E 111
7.4 Organization for T&E 113
7.5 Planning for T&E 115
7.6 T&E in the Project Life Cycle 118
7.7 Conclusion 119 References 119 Study Questions 119 Chapter 8 Risk Management Rene G. Rendon 121
8.1 Introduction 121
8.2 Risk Management in the Defense Acquisition Environment 122
8.3 Risk-Management Process 124
8.4 Risk-Management Documentation 135
8.5 Current Trends in Risk Management 136
8.6 Conclusion 137 References 138 Study Questions 138 Chapter 9 Manufacturing and Quality Michael Boudreau 139
9.1 Introduction 139
9.2 Defense Industrial Capability 140
9.3 The Manufacturing Spectrum 140
9.4 Manufacturing Connection to the Project Life Cycle and Systems Engineering 141
9.5 Manufacturing Readiness Levels 147
9.6 Producibility 147
9.7 Manufacturing Elements 148
9.8 Manufacturing Tools and Techniques 148
9.9 Quality Management 150
9.10 Quality-Management Systems 151
9.11 DoD Policies Related to Quality 155
9.12 Conclusion 156 References 157 Study Questions 157 Chapter 10 Contract Management Rene G. Rendon 159
10.1 Introduction 160
10.2 Government Contracting Basics 160
10.3 Roles and Responsibilities in Defense Contract Management 162
10.4 Contract-Management Process 164
10.5 Contract Management from the Contractor's Perspective 181
10.6 Emerging Trends in Defense Contract Management 184
10.7 Conclusion 185 References 186 Study Questions 187 Chapter 11 Financial Management Philip J. Candreva 189
11.1 Introduction 189
11.2 DoD Financial-Management Framework 191
11.3 Budgeting 194
11.4 Funds Execution 201
11.5 Looking Qutside the DoD 211
11.6 Timeless Questions in Defense Financial Management 217
11.7 Conclusion 226 References 227 Study Questions 229 Chapter 12 Earned Value Management Keith F. Snider John T. Dillard 231
12.1 Introduction 231
12.2 EVM Application 232
12.3 Performance Measurement Baseline 233
12.4 Measuring Work in the PMB 234
12.5 Changes to the PMB During Contract Performance 235
12.6 Measuring Contract Performance Against the PMB 236
12.7 EVM Analysis 237
12.8 Projecting Future Contract Performance 238
12.9 Conclusion 239 References 239 Study Questions 240 Chapter 13 Strategic Purchasing Bryan Hudgens 241
13.1 Introduction 241
13.2 Purchasing and Organizational Strategy 242
13.3 Strategic Purchasing and Organizational Competitive Advantage 242
13.4 Strategic Outsourcing Considerations 245
13.5 Purchasing and Supply-Chain Management 247
13.6 Supplier Selection and Supply-Base Management 249
13.7 Strategic Analysis Tools 253
13.8 Organizing for Strategic Purchasing 254
13.9 Conclusion 255
13.10 Additional Resources 255 References 256 Study Questions 257 Chapter 14 Organizational Aspects of Defense Acquisition John T. Dillard 259
14.1 Introduction 259
14.2 Acquisition Organization: Decision Making 260
14.3 Acquisition Organization: Program Management Offices 261
14.4 Organization Theory: Acquisition Applications 263
14.5 Conclusion: Organizational Control and Project Risk 264 References 265 Study Questions 265 Chapter 15 Defense Acquisition Workforce Pene G. Rendon 267
15.1 Introduction 267
15.2 Defining the Acquisition Workforce 268
15.3 Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act 269
15.4 Emphasis on Human Capital 270
15.5 Education and Training 272
15.6 Professional Associations 273
15.7 Conclusion: Current Challenges in the Defense Acquisition Workforce 277 References 279 Study Questions 279 Index 281 Supporting Materials 293
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