Managing a Global Resource: Challenges of Forest Conservation and Development

Overview

The rapid loss of tropical forests, particularly in the developing world, has been a global concern since the late 1980s and has prompted a variety of international initiatives to save the forests. In 1991, the World Bank responded to global concerns and to criticism by nongovernmental organizations by forming a conservation-oriented forest strategy. Managing a Global Resource is an outgrowth of the independent evaluation conducted by the World Bank's Operations Evaluation ...

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Overview

The rapid loss of tropical forests, particularly in the developing world, has been a global concern since the late 1980s and has prompted a variety of international initiatives to save the forests. In 1991, the World Bank responded to global concerns and to criticism by nongovernmental organizations by forming a conservation-oriented forest strategy. Managing a Global Resource is an outgrowth of the independent evaluation conducted by the World Bank's Operations Evaluation Department and discusses how effectively that strategy was implemented.

In this detailed investigation, Uma J. Lele explores why the loss of forests and biodiversity has been so rapid in some developing countries (Brazil, Indonesia, and Cameroon) and not in others (China, India, and Costa Rica). She assesses future prospects for conservation in these six countries by critically examining their policies, institutional arrangements, and emerging national and international instruments to conserve forests and biodiversity. Together these six countries account for 25 percent of the world's forest cover and 44 percent of the world's population. Managing a Global Resource presents case studies of the forest sectors of each country in the context of overall development policies, interest groups, and governance issues. Lele's investigation finds a fundamental divergence in forest-rich countries between the global objectives of conservation and the local objectives of development and private profit. In some forest-poor countries, in contrast, natural resource loss has led the countries on their own accord to adopt a variety of conservation-oriented policies and programs. Despite the greater congruence between the global and national objectives in these forest-poor countries, competing demands on their resources and the constraints on their policies, institutions, and human capital make it difficult for them to affect forest and biodiversity conservation.

This volume makes it clear that without substantial international financial transfers and knowledge of appropriate, location-specific solutions, much of the world's tropical forests will be lost. Even with substantial financial resources the prospects for conservation depend on a complex and dynamic set of country-specific factors. Managing a Global Resource offers unusually rich insights into the global/national interactions and lessons for future strategies. It will be of interest to conservationists and environmentalists concerned with the future of conservation in a changing environment.

Uma J. Lele is senior advisor in the World Bank's Operations Evaluation Department. She has written extensively on issues of agricultural and rural development and aid and capital flows, and is best known for her works on rural development and aid effectiveness in Africa.

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Editorial Reviews

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Lele (World Bank's Operations Evaluation Department) explores why the loss of forests and biodiversity has progressed rapidly in some developing countries (Brazil, Indonesia, and Cameroon) and not in others (China, India, and Costa Rica). She offers the main findings of the OED review, which concluded that the Bank's 1991 forest strategy had been modest, and assesses future prospects by looking closely at the countries' policies, institutional arrangements, and emerging national and international conservation instruments. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765801371
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 7/11/2002
  • Series: World Bank Series
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements
Glossary
Acronyms and Abbreviations
1 Managing a Global Resource: An Overview 1
2 Costa Rica: At the Cutting Edge 45
3 China: The World's Largest Experiment in Conservation and Development 73
4 India's Forests: Potential for Poverty Alleviation 99
5 A New Deal for Cameroon's Forests? 137
6 Forest Management in Indonesia: Moving from Autocratic Regime to Decentralized Democracy 167
7 Brazil's Forests: Managing Tradeoffs among Local, National, and International Interests 223
8 The Way Ahead 269
Index 301
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