Managing Change Pocketbook

Managing Change Pocketbook

by Neil Russell-Jones
     
 

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For anyone responsible for managing change or handling imposed change. Explains what change is and why it is necessary, why some change needs proactive management, the effects of change on people, how to gain commitment, how to manage it. Includes examples of success and failure  See more details below

Overview

For anyone responsible for managing change or handling imposed change. Explains what change is and why it is necessary, why some change needs proactive management, the effects of change on people, how to gain commitment, how to manage it. Includes examples of success and failure

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781906610395
Publisher:
Management Pocketbooks
Publication date:
10/28/2011
Pages:
112

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

WHAT IS CHANGE?

DEFINITIONS

Noun

--Making or becoming different

--Difference from previous state

--Substitution of one for another

--Variation

Verb

--To undergo, show or subject to change

--To make or become different

The emphasis is on making something different. This could be a major change or merely incremental. Whichever it is implies a difference.

ANNUAL CHANGE CYCLE

There is major change all around you.

Each year the earth goes through an enormous change caused by its rotation (more perceptible in some parts than others) which forces responses that are staggering in enormity. For example, deciduous trees shed their leaves and close down for winter, to bloom again in spring; and animals change their coats (mink/ermine).

Think too, of the way in which we humans have to respond to climatic changes, by varying our clothing at different times of the year or by regulating the heating or air conditioning. Our well-being depends upon managing such change.

INCREMENTAL CHANGE

The change from manual recording of information (writing) to current laptops with advanced capability is an enormous one. In fact, it occurred incrementally through several steps.

Each step is incremental, requiring skills training and capital outlay.

The change in information processing was even greater, from scrolls to libraries to main frames to midis to LANs.

METAMORPHOSIS

Change can be of an even greater nature. Consider metamorphosis, for example, which requires a complete change of state and represents a severe shock to the status quo (in this case requiring a sleeping phase to cope with thechange).

ORGANISATIONAL

Incremental change:

  • 10% decrease in staff (usually achieved by natural wastage and early retirement; therefore non-threatening)
  • Introduction of performance-related pay (can be threatening for those who might underperform or perceive that they might)
  • Major change:

  • 25%+ reduction in staff (commonly involving large-scale redundancies/closures/relocation and leading to great fear and uncertainty and therefore great resistance)
  • Premises rationalisation (usually results in changed work environments in terms of place and benefits)
  • Disinvestment/acquisition (usually leads to great fear and uncertainty which can cause it to fail; GEC's bid by Siemens was halted by the staff in Germany fearing for their jobs because of the likelihood of rationalisation)
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