Managing Customers as Investments: The Strategic Value of Customers in the Long Run

Managing Customers as Investments: The Strategic Value of Customers in the Long Run

by Sunil Gupta, Donald R. Lehmann
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

What's a customer really worth? Can you find out, without endlesslycomplex modeling? And once you know, what should you do with thatknowledge? Managing Your Customers as Investments has the answers.You'll learn simple ways to get reliable customer value information—ina form you can use. You'll discover how to use it to measure marketingeffectiveness, generate

See more details below

Overview

What's a customer really worth? Can you find out, without endlesslycomplex modeling? And once you know, what should you do with thatknowledge? Managing Your Customers as Investments has the answers.You'll learn simple ways to get reliable customer value information—ina form you can use. You'll discover how to use it to measure marketingeffectiveness, generate improvements throughout the entire customerrelationship lifecycle, and improve decision-making. Everyone tells youto manage your business around customers. This book gives you the toolsto do it.

Editorial Reviews

Soundview Executive Book Summaries
Business professors Sunil Gupta and Donald R. Lehmann recognize the difficulties in finding and explaining the tangible impact of attracting and retaining customers. In Managing Customers as Investments, they offer a set of tools that shows the correlation between a firm's customer assets and the value of the firm. They explain the triggers that drive this value, and how to better manage customers and, as a result, shareholders' wealth. They unlock the metrics and provide the tools and tips to make any company's customer-related efforts more efficient.

Customers Are Assets
Customers are the lifeblood of any organization. Without customers, a firm has no revenues, no profits, and therefore, no market value. Contrary to the commonly held view, the authors point out that creating shareholder wealth in the short run is not the main purpose of an organization. Long-run shareholder wealth is the reward for creating customer value.

The approach to linking customer and firm value discussed in Managing Customers as Investments is based on a simple premise � that customers are typically the primary source of earnings for a company. The authors write that if we can estimate the value of current and future customers, then we have a proxy for a large part of the value of a firm. If, for example, the average value of a customer to a firm is $100, and the firm has 30 million customers, then the value of its current customer base is $3 billion. If we factor in the firm's future customer acquisition rate and estimate the present value of future customers at $1 billion, then the value of its current and future customers is $4 billion. The authors write that this estimate provides a good proxy for the value of the firm.

The authors explain that this approach differs from the traditional finance approach in two key aspects. First, unlike traditional finance, this approach builds from the bottom up by assessing the value of a customer. Secondly, it treats marketing expenditures differently than traditional approaches. If you believe that customers are indeed assets that generate profits over the long run, the authors write, then marketing expenditures to acquire and retain these customers should be treated as investments, not expenses.

The Value of a Customer
The fundamental building block of the approach described in Managing Customers as Investments is the customer lifetime value (CLV), which is the present value of all current and future profits generated from a customer over the life of his or her business with a firm. This concept incorporates several aspects � the importance of not only current but also future profits, the time value of money such that $100 of profits today are worth more than $100 of profits tomorrow, and the possibility that customers may not do business with a firm forever.

To estimate CLV, the authors write that two pieces of information are required: customers' profit patterns and their defection rate. The profit pattern is the profits (margin) generated from a customer over his or her tenure with the firm. The defection rate plots the pattern of the number of customers who stop doing business with a firm over a period of time.

Creating Metrics That Matter
The authors explain that firms have historically faced enormous challenges in implementing the concept of customer lifetime value as a core business metric. This gap between theory and practice is a result of three major factors:

  • Data requirements. Consider what data are needed to estimate the lifetime value of a customer. First, in order to know a customer's tenure with a company, a firm needs to track each customer or customer cohort (a group of customers acquired simultaneously). Second, for each customer or cohort, a firm needs to know its profit pattern over time, which requires projections of future profits. Third, a firm needs to know customer retention and defection rates over time.
  • Complexity. Metrics that matter to top management must be clear, simple, forward-looking, and they must capture the big picture.
  • Illusion of precision. Estimating CLV requires a host of assumptions and subjective decisions that make it far less precise than many would like to believe.
Copyright © 2006 Soundview Executive Book Summaries


—Synopsis

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131428959
Publisher:
Wharton School Publishing
Publication date:
01/21/2005
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >