Managing for Results 2005

Overview

The "managing for results" movement that began in the early 1990s has now reached adolescence and is creating new challenges for government managers. After spending years creating planning and performance-measuring systems, managers and policy makers now need to focus on how to use performance information to make data-driven decisions. Managing Results for 2005 describes—through a series of case studies—the progress being made in federal, state, and local governments in managing for results. Part I increases our ...
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Overview

The "managing for results" movement that began in the early 1990s has now reached adolescence and is creating new challenges for government managers. After spending years creating planning and performance-measuring systems, managers and policy makers now need to focus on how to use performance information to make data-driven decisions. Managing Results for 2005 describes—through a series of case studies—the progress being made in federal, state, and local governments in managing for results. Part I increases our understanding about the potential use of performance information in government. It starts with a chapter on how government leaders can overcome obstacles to using performance information. Another chapter presents a comprehensive framework for tying performance to the budget process. The book provides specific examples of how performance information has been used to dramatically improve program outcomes. Part II presents case studies on the use of performance information to improve results in a range of federal agencies, in Texas state government, and in the City of Baltimore. As pioneering efforts, these examples do not all present success stories; nevertheless, the lessons learned will be instructive to public managers as the "managing for results" movement advances toward maturity.
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Editorial Reviews

Public Administration
This book, sponsored by the IBM Center for the Business of Government, is a collection of nine reports on managing for results. The contributors-who include Carolyn J. Heinrich, Philip Joyce, Elaine Morley, Joseph S. Wholey, and Chris Wye-offer guiding principles for linking performance management to performance information and detailed case studies.
Reference and Research Book News
Analyses and case studies describe the progress being made in federal, state, and local governments in managing for results - a movement that began in the early 1990s and uses the information gleaned from performance-measuring systems to make data-driven decisions. Chapters describe how the cultures of government agencies are changing to reflect results-oriented planning in their day-to-day operations. The contributors are academics and consultants in public policy and public administration.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742545441
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/10/2004
  • Series: IBM Center for the Business of Government Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 528
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

John M. Kamensky is associate partner at IBM Business Consulting Services and senior fellow at the IBM Center for the Business of Government. Albert Morales is partner and practice leader of the Public Sector Strategy and Change Practice at IBM Business Consulting Services.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 From "useful measures" to "measures used" 1
Ch. 2 Performance management for career executives : a "start where you are, use what you have" guide 17
Ch. 3 Linking performance and budgeting : opportunities in the federal budget process 83
Ch. 4 E-reporting : using managing-for-results data to strengthen democratic accountability 141
Ch. 5 How federal programs use outcome information : opportunities for federal managers 197
Ch. 6 Strategies for using state information : measuring and improving program performance 277
Ch. 7 Setting performance targets : lessons from the Workforce Investment Act system 351
Ch. 8 Collabortion and performance management in network settings : lessons from three watershed governance efforts 379
Ch. 9 Using a performance budgeting system : lessons from the Texas experience 425
Ch. 10 The Baltimore CitiStat program : performance and accountability 465
About the IBM Center for The Business of Government 509
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