Managing Managed Care by Michael Roberts, Linda K. Hurley |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Managing Managed Care

Managing Managed Care

by Michael C. Roberts, Linda K. Hurley
     
 

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This timely volume explains the pitfalls and problems of managed care for those practitioners, especially child clinicians, who wish to take part in it, while mapping out independent financing strategies for those who wish to remain outside the system. Managing Managed Care provides an overview of the managed care marketplace as it currently affects children and

Overview

This timely volume explains the pitfalls and problems of managed care for those practitioners, especially child clinicians, who wish to take part in it, while mapping out independent financing strategies for those who wish to remain outside the system. Managing Managed Care provides an overview of the managed care marketplace as it currently affects children and families, reviews relevant legal and financial issues, and illustrates with case examples some problems of the system.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Harry M. Shallcross, PhD (Private Practice)
Description: This book provides an overview of managed care with guidelines for the child and family practitioner in private practice who wishes to maintain an independent practice in a managed care environment. It describes the basic functions and economic framework for managed care, and offers a general discussion of marketing opportunities outside managed care reimbursement structures as a means of protecting the integrity of a private practice from the "pitfalls" of managed care.
Purpose: Its purpose is to support the continued economic viability of clinicians in private practice. It describes the opportunities and obstacles in a managed care environment, and attempts to develop a framework within which a practice can be successful. It describes ways to educate managed care organizations about the importance of providing quality child and family services, and ways to develop an alternative patient base outside managed care. The book is a collection of anecdotes, research facts, and private practice war stories with an anti-managed care perspective, seemingly designed to motivate the private practitioner to keep on negotiating the difficult terrain of private practice in a managed care world.
Audience: It is clearly written for the child and family practitioner whose private practice is beleaguered by managed care utilization restrictions and downward financial pressures. It provides plenty of information to support the position of those who have an aversion to managed care, some of which may be marginally useful in negotiation for authorization of services and educating managed care organizations about the value and integrity of child and family services. The authors reflect a private practitioner and academic perspective, and are likely to appeal to those audiences.
Features: The book is a fairly traditional organization and presentation of descriptive information, scientific background, and clinical anecdotes. It is very readable and provides some concrete examples for implementing strategies, but its presentation is not very compelling
Assessment: This is not a very useful book. It provides little new information and reinforces a common notion that private practice is about quality and managed care is about money. This is not a very useful position for the private practitioner in today's market. There is little concrete advice here that has not been offered before. It presents a very one-sided and frequently inaccurate description of the worst aspects of managed care. There is nothing about more innovative aspects of managed care, including the development of a system of care for children and families which presents genuine opportunities for clinicians. This book will likely appeal only to those who already have an anti-managed care bias and seek more ideological support for that position. Even for that audience, however, there is really nothing new here.
2 Stars from Doody
Harry M. Shallcross
This book provides an overview of managed care with guidelines for the child and family practitioner in private practice who wishes to maintain an independent practice in a managed care environment. It describes the basic functions and economic framework for managed care, and offers a general discussion of marketing opportunities outside managed care reimbursement structures as a means of protecting the integrity of a private practice from the ""pitfalls"" of managed care. Its purpose is to support the continued economic viability of clinicians in private practice. It describes the opportunities and obstacles in a managed care environment, and attempts to develop a framework within which a practice can be successful. It describes ways to educate managed care organizations about the importance of providing quality child and family services, and ways to develop an alternative patient base outside managed care. The book is a collection of anecdotes, research facts, and private practice war stories with an anti-managed care perspective, seemingly designed to motivate the private practitioner to keep on negotiating the difficult terrain of private practice in a managed care world. It is clearly written for the child and family practitioner whose private practice is beleaguered by managed care utilization restrictions and downward financial pressures. It provides plenty of information to support the position of those who have an aversion to managed care, some of which may be marginally useful in negotiation for authorization of services and educating managed care organizations about the value and integrity of child and family services. The authors reflect a private practitioner andacademic perspective, and are likely to appeal to those audiences. The book is a fairly traditional organization and presentation of descriptive information, scientific background, and clinical anecdotes. It is very readable and provides some concrete examples for implementing strategies, but its presentation is not very compelling This is not a very useful book. It provides little new information and reinforces a common notion that private practice is about quality and managed care is about money. This is not a very useful position for the private practitioner in today's market. There is little concrete advice here that has not been offered before. It presents a very one-sided and frequently inaccurate description of the worst aspects of managed care. There is nothing about more innovative aspects of managed care, including the development of a system of care for children and families which presents genuine opportunities for clinicians. This book will likely appeal only to those who already have an anti-managed care bias and seek more ideological support for that position. Even for that audience, however, there is really nothing new here.
Booknews
This book is designed to inform clinicians, and particularly child and pediatric psychologists, about the various types of managed care systems, how they work, and their advantages and pitfalls. The authors offer clinicians in managed systems advice about providing effective care to children and families, and about legal and financial risks. They also provide information for those who do not want to enter managed care or wish to restrict their involvement in it. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306456701
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
Publication date:
11/28/1997
Series:
Clinical Child Psychology Library Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
212

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