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Managing Patient Expectations: The Art of Finding and Keeping Loyal Patients / Edition 1

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Overview

Satisfied patients refer, dissatisfied patients deter. Patient retention, referrals, and the personal rewards of medicine are all closely linked to quality relationships developed with patients. Patients value experiences in which their unique preferences are identified and respected. When these preferences are realistic, successful organizations find ways to remember and honor them. But even when unrealistic, a patient's preferences must be managed in a way that preserves and improves the relationship.

In this important resource, Susan Keane Baker—an expert in the field of physician practice management and patient satisfaction—describes how to develop the qualities of understanding, empathy, and compassion that help to meet and exceed patient expectations. Managing Patient Expectations is filled with realistic and cost-effective strategies for maintaining patient satisfaction, creating loyalty, and increasing referrals. This practical guide explains how to find out what patients really think and how physicians can best respond in a variety of situations.

Managing Patient Expectations is filled with winning techniques and illustrative examples from some of the country's leading health care facilities. The book maps out how to

  • Identify patient expectations
  • Generate positive word-of-mouth comments from patients and staff
  • Enhance listening skills
  • Respond effectively to patient complaints and adverse patient outcomes
  • Build loyal patient relationships

Written for all members of the health care team, the book reveals the vital role that each person plays in managing patient expectations. Baker offers practical yet effective techniques for all types of patient interactions— from answering the phone to encouraging patient follow-through— that will create loyalty, improve outcomes, and build strong patient relationships.

Strategies for Building Satisfying Patient Relationships
Understanding expectations, and how they are created and influenced, is the key to developing mutually beneficial patient relationships. Managing Patient Expectations is filled with winning techniques and illustrative examples from some of the country's leading health care facilities.

"This book fills a huge void in the areas of medical education and the delivery of patient service. The clear advice about how to identify and respond to patient needs and preferences is essential reading for physicians and those who work with them. If the personal rewards of medicine are important to you, read this book."—Joseph A. Lieberman, III, M.D., M.P.H., chairman, department of family and community medicine, clinical professor of family medicine, Thomas Jefferson University

"Winning teams depend on the loyalty and enthusiasm of every member. Here, in one place, is all you need to know about creating that same kind of loyalty and enthusiasm in your patients and staff."—Lou Holtz, former head football coach, University of Notre Dame

"Malpractice claims are often the result of unmet and sometimes unrealistic patient expectations-with an overlay of miscommunication. Baker's book gives practical advice that easily translates into loss prevention lessons."—Peggy Berry Martin, director of education, Harvard Risk Management Foundation

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: James E. Casanova, MD (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Description: This is a concise, easy-to-read survey of techniques to attract new patients and instill loyalty and satisfaction in established patients. It contains examples of improved customer satisfaction from healthcare organizations as well as other service industries.
Purpose: Satisfied patients are more compliant, more enjoyable to work with, less litigious, and better for the bottom line. The author's purpose is to remind us of these facts and suggest specific actions to make patient satisfaction a reality. This subject matter has always been important, but more so now in the age of managed care, time constraints, and impersonal healthcare delivery systems. The book achieves its purpose, with some chapters more helpful than others.
Audience: The preface indicates that the book has been written for a diverse audience including physicians, clinic staff, case managers, risk managers, non-physician clinicians, health system leaders, and those interested in patient outcomes measurement. The author is well informed and organized.
Features: The book is organized into five parts that progress in a logical sequence. The reader is first exposed to creating and identifying patient expectations, and then how to manage them. Finally there is a discussion of responding to unmet expectations and how to exceed expectations. Particularly helpful chapters address first impressions, listening skills, and "moments of truth" when a provider has the chance to "make or break" the relationship with a given patient. Other useful topics include the development of patient-oriented clinical guidelines, and the importance of a clear, concise bill.
Assessment: This is a worthwhile book for everyone who has contact with patients. Although much of what is discussed is not really new, we need to be reminded of the importance of these issues again and again. The message is that patients' expectations are not set in stone but are dynamic personal issues that can be influenced and managed by successful providers. The book is similar to Improving Patient Satisfaction Now, (Aspen, 1997). Either book could be used as a catalyst for efforts to improve customer satisfaction in the healthcare setting.
From the Publisher
"Winning teams depAnd on the loyalty and enthusiasm of every member. Here, in one place, is all you need to know about creating that same kind of loyalty and enthusiasm in your patients and staff." (Lou Holtz, former head football coach, University of Notre Dame)

"Malpractice claims are often the result of unmet and sometimes unrealistic patient expectations? with an overlay of miscommunication. Baker's book gives practical advice that easily translates into loss prevention lessons." (Peggy Berry Martin, director of education, Harvard Risk Management Foundation)

"This book fills a huge void in the areas of medical education and the delivery of patient service. The clear advice about how to identify and respond to patient needs and preferences is essential reading for physicians and those who work with them. If the personal rewards of medicine are important to you, read this book." (Joseph A. Lieberman, III, M.D., M.P.H., chairman, department of family and community medicine, clinical professor of family medicine, Thomas Jefferson University)

James E. Casanova
This is a concise, easy-to-read survey of techniques to attract new patients and instill loyalty and satisfaction in established patients. It contains examples of improved customer satisfaction from healthcare organizations as well as other service industries. Satisfied patients are more compliant, more enjoyable to work with, less litigious, and better for the bottom line. The author's purpose is to remind us of these facts and suggest specific actions to make patient satisfaction a reality. This subject matter has always been important, but more so now in the age of managed care, time constraints, and impersonal healthcare delivery systems. The book achieves its purpose, with some chapters more helpful than others. The preface indicates that the book has been written for a diverse audience including physicians, clinic staff, case managers, risk managers, non-physician clinicians, health system leaders, and those interested in patient outcomes measurement. The author is well informed and organized. The book is organized into five parts that progress in a logical sequence. The reader is first exposed to creating and identifying patient expectations, and then how to manage them. Finally there is a discussion of responding to unmet expectations and how to exceed expectations. Particularly helpful chapters address first impressions, listening skills, and ""moments of truth"" when a provider has the chance to ""make or break"" the relationship with a given patient. Other useful topics include the development of patient-oriented clinical guidelines, and the importance of a clear, concise bill. This is a worthwhile book for everyone who has contact with patients. Although much ofwhat is discussed is not really new, we need to be reminded of the importance of these issues again and again. The message is that patients' expectations are not set in stone but are dynamic personal issues that can be influenced and managed by successful providers. The book is similar to Improving Patient Satisfaction Now, (Aspen, 1997). Either book could be used as a catalyst for efforts to improve customer satisfaction in the healthcare setting.
Booknews
Explains that patient retention, referrals that bring in new patients, and the personal rewards of medicine are all closely linked to developing quality relationships with patients. Describes how to develop the qualities of understanding, empathy, and compassion and how to recognize and remember the unique preferences of each patient and at least to manage those that cannot be satisfied. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787941581
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/28/1998
  • Series: Business and Management Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.15 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

SUSAN KEANE BAKER is an educator, author, and speaker on the topics of practice management, service quality, and risk management. Baker serves on the faculty for the Healthcare Assembly's Physician Practice Management Certificate Program, Managed Care College and Risk Management Certificate Program. She has held various leadership positions in hospitals and managed care organizations and teaches graduate seminars in practice management for several universities.

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Table of Contents

CREATING EXPECTATION.

Prior Expectations.

Word of Mouth.

Advertising, Media, and Managed Care.

First Impressions.

IDENTIFYING EXPECTATIONS.

Listening Skills.

Patient Feedback.

MANAGING PATIENT EXPECTATIONS.

Moments of Truth.

Staff Strategies.

Informed Consent.

Patient Education.

Best Practices.

RESPONDING TO UNMET EXPECTATIONS.

Complaints.

Patient Follow Through.

Adverse Patient Outcomes.

When Patients Leave.

EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS.

Respecting Patient Preferences.

Building Loyal Relationships.

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