Managing Privacy through Accountability

Overview

Surveillance technologies form an increasingly ubiquitous presence in many EU member states. CCTV cameras, traffic regulation systems, ID cards, biometric developments, airport security checks and on-line forms of dataveillance are just some of the many ways in which the public are subject to forms of scrutiny, data collection, data storage and data sharing. These surveillance systems are often welcomed as a means of protection and for easing public fears, but also raise profound questions for democratic states ...

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Managing Privacy through Accountability

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Overview

Surveillance technologies form an increasingly ubiquitous presence in many EU member states. CCTV cameras, traffic regulation systems, ID cards, biometric developments, airport security checks and on-line forms of dataveillance are just some of the many ways in which the public are subject to forms of scrutiny, data collection, data storage and data sharing. These surveillance systems are often welcomed as a means of protection and for easing public fears, but also raise profound questions for democratic states of the nature of the relationship between state and citizenry. Currently, regulation of surveillance systems differs across EU member states, including legal prohibitions, forms of licensing, self-certification, data protection and information or data protection commissioners. Forms of accountability have emerged as one means by which the potential consequences of surveillance systems might be recognized and assessed and formally incorporated into public sector policy or into the ways in which companies do business. Managing Privacy through Accountability draws together contributions from leading figures in the field of surveillance to engage in discussion of the emergence of accountability as a central motif in debates around privacy invasion and privacy protection. It is the first book to engage in this debate.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'Can robust forms of accountability successfully temper the negative effects of contemporary surveillance? This book provides a much-needed, critical exploration of the potentials of accountability cultures to transform institutions so that privacy protections are taken seriously.' - Torin Monahan, author of Surveillance in the Time of Insecurity
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230369320
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 5.70 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

DANIEL NEYLAND is a Senior Lecturer at Lancaster University, UK. His research interests cover issues of governance, accountability and ethics in forms of science, technology and organization. He has been involved in various funded research initiatives and currently works on several EU framework 7 projects. He has published widely, including a book entitled Privacy, Surveillance and Public Trust (2006) and an edited collection on New Directions in Surveillance and Privacy (2009).

LEON HEMPEL is a senior researcher at the Centre for Technology and Society at the Technical University Berlin, Germany, since 1999. His research areas are sociology of technology and innovation, security studies and evaluation methodology. Leon co-ordinated the EU funded project URBANEYE on the use and societal impacts of CCTV within public accessible space and currently leads EU projects PATS (Privacy Awareness through Security Organisation Branding) and SIAM (Security Impact Assessment Measure).

INGA KROENER is a Senior Research Associate at Lancaster University, UK. Her research interests lie in the area of contemporary history of CCTV and public engagement in the UK, the history of modern science and technology, the sociology of science and public dimensions of science and technology. She currently works on two EU Framework 7 projects.

HECTOR POSTIGO is Associate Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Broadcasting Telecommunications and Mass Media (BTMM) at Temple University, USA. His research engages with computer hacking and security in social movements and activism. Recently, he has been asked by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in San Francisco, CA. (the premier U.S social movement organization working on consumer digital privacy rights) to study its use and rhetorical construction of 'privacy' and other digital rights during its lobbying campaigns.

CARLA ILTEN is a junior researcher at the Technical University Berlin, Germany, currently working on the EU FP7 PATS project. She is now working on a PhD thesis on activism for social change and new media after conducting field research as a Visiting Scholar at Temple University.

DANIEL GUAGNIN is a junior researcher at the Technical University Berlin, Germany. He is currently working on the FP7 Project PATS on Privacy Awareness. Alongside privacy and surveillance, his research interests include the free content movement and the social implications of technologies.

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Table of Contents

List of Tables

List of Figures

Preface

Notes on Contributors

Introduction
Daniel Neyland, Daniel Guagnin, Leon Hempel, Carla Ilten, Inga Kroener and Hector Postigo

Chapter 1 The Meaning of 'Accountability' in the Information Privacy Context
Charles Raab

Chapter 2 The Accountability Approach to Privacy and Data Protection: Assumptions and Caveats
Colin J. Bennett

Chapter 3 The accountability principle in data protection regulation: origin, development and future directions
Joseph Alhadeff, Brendan Van Alsenoy and Jos Dumortier

Chapter 4 The challenges of working out surveillance and accountability in theory and practice
Daniel Neyland

Chapter 5 Bridging the gap: we need to get together
Daniel Guagnin, Leon Hempel, Carla Ilten

Chapter 6 Privacy and Trust In Sociotechnical Systems of Accountability
Priscilla M. Regan and Deborah G. Johnson

Chapter 7 Maintaining Sovereignty over Personal Data in Social Networking Sites
Esma AImeur, Sébastien Gambs and Ai Ho

Chapter 8'Cold Intimacies': Community Notification, Satellite Tracking and the Ruined Privacy of Sex Offenders
Mike Nellis

Chapter 9 Electronic Health Records – The case for accountability in hospitals
Alexander Dix

Chapter 10 Accountability and System Responsibility: New Concepts in Data Protection Law and Human Rights Law
Paul De Hert

Chapter 11 Accountability and independence of data protection authorities – A trade-off?
Philip Schütz

Chapter 12 Beyond accountability, the returban to privacy?
Raphaël Gellert and Serge Gutwirth

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