Managing Teams (DK Essential Managers Series)

Managing Teams (DK Essential Managers Series)

3.0 1
by Robert Heller, Robet Heller, Tim Hindle, Tim Hindle
     
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789428950
Publisher:
DK
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Series:
DK Essential Managers Series
Pages:
72
Sales rank:
1,224,524
Product dimensions:
4.98(w) x 10.76(h) x 0.22(d)

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Managing Teams 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author Robert Heller has some good strong points on mananging staff. He proposes that 'cross-functional, multi-disciplinary, interdepartmental teams' are becoming the standard method of staff organization, rather than the hierarchy structure. By delegating team functions to each individual, teamwork increases. In the early chapters he gives good advice on directing team projects and how to assess the best role for each staff member. He also talks about how to effectively run a team meeting. He also talks about getting each member to think creatively and contribute an idea rather than just one person giving ideas. He adds that tracking team progress with regular meetings is a must for successful goals, and setting targets helps in reaching goals. On training teams (my favorite topic), Heller gives tips about listening to staff feedback about their training, have members evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses, and even have off-site 'away days' for staff meetings or training sessions. He adds that it is important for the training leaders to possess or be trained in management skills to successfully manage a staff, and possess the needed qualities of supervision, prioritizing, tolerance and listening. I found the book a useful pocket guide, but not detailed enough; it doesn't contain guidelines, only tips, so the reader should have previous understanding of what the author is talking about. Heller gives useful information mostly for people already in management who have a basic understanding of their duties and staff structure.