Managing the Construction Process: Estimating, Scheduling, and Project Control / Edition 3

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Overview

Comprehensive and unique in its perspective, this reliable, easy-to-read book covers all areas of the Construction Management industry—with a balanced focus on both theory and practicality. It helps users gain a working knowledge of the whole Building Industry, as well as the technical skills required to manage a construction project from conception through occupancy. It emphasizes current industry practices, making it a useful reference for the construction professional. All topic areas are clearly marked for easy reference; these include: construction project management, contracts and delivery methods, detailed estimating, scheduling, network construction, project control, and project updating. For construction professionals, including engineers, technicians, schedulers, and planners.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131134065
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 6/14/2004
  • Series: Pearson Construction Technology Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 8.08 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Industry and the project 3
Ch. 2 The project management process 29
Ch. 3 Construction contracts and delivery methods 55
Ch. 4 Estimating fundamentals 77
Ch. 5 Conceptual and square foot estimating 103
Ch. 6 Assemblies estimating 133
Ch. 7 Detailed estimating 173
Ch. 8 Scheduling fundamentals 205
Ch. 9 Network construction 227
Ch. 10 Activity duration and network calculations 247
Ch. 11 Fundamentals of project control 269
Ch. 12 Cost, schedule, and resource control 295
Ch. 13 Updating the project control in practice 319
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Preface

With the growth of the construction management profession, and the resulting expansion of construction management courses both in the major and as electives in many architectural and engineering school curriculums, a need has arisen to combine the various facets of the profession into one comprehensive text. Current texts either concentrate on a single function—scheduling, estimating, or project control—or cover the profession in an overview of project management.

In addition, practitioners who need a primer on current industry practices will find this text to be a good reference. The text is organized to cover all areas of the construction management industry, with an emphasis on maintaining a balance between theory and practice. Each of the four sections is introduced with background theory and fundamentals, which are followed by practical applications, frequent illustrations, sidebars written by industry professionals, chapter review questions, and a project highlight. The latter is a recurring feature, relating the teaching of each of the four sections of the book to an actual construction project, the recent renovation of two buildings at MIT. By using this text, students and practitioners—designers, owners, contractors, and construction managers—alike will gain knowledge of the building industry and the technical skills required to manage a construction project.

Section One, Construction Project Management, provides an overview of the industry. The roles and responsibilities of construction participants, organization of the project team, and factors affecting the project scope and timeline are all discussed in this section. Team play andconcepts such as bonding, value engineering, and partnering are defined and emphasized. This section prepares the reader for a more thorough study of the major topics that follow: estimating, scheduling, and project control.

Section Two, Estimating, reviews the techniques and methods used in preparing the costs for a construction project. It discusses the quantity takeoff process, the establishment of unit prices, and the adjustment of costs for time and location. The section covers estimating in the context of a project's evolution. It demonstrates that as project information becomes better, the estimate becomes increasingly detailed, thereby feeding information back into the project to support sounder design and construction decisions.

Section Three, Scheduling, addresses the value of schedules and provides examples of different scheduling methods. The network-based Critical Path Method is covered in the most detail. Activity definition, the creation of a logic diagram, the calculation oaf activity durations, and network calculations are all explained. Computer applications and examples of computer output are included.

Section Four, Project Control, concludes the book. This part examines how the estimate and the schedule are used to provide timely information to the owner and other project participants. In the preconstruction stage, this information can be integrated into a work plan that accurately projects resource usage. In the construction phase, this work plan allows the comparison of actual production to planned production and provides feedback to the project team. This section looks at how the integration of the schedule and the estimate forms this work plan. Examples of integrated reports and a sidebar on Computer Integrated Construction complete this section.

Both the organization and the content of this book have been designed to allow it to serve as a useful reference for the practitioner as well as the student. In the classroom, the book will serve well as a teaching tool for the architectural, construction, or civil engineering student. The text provides an overview of all aspects of construction management, with enough practical examples for the student to get a view of the world of construction management. As a reference for the professional, the book is organized so as to allow quick and easy access to information on current tools and practices of the profession—hence its utility to learners and experienced professionals alike.

Acknowledgments

Many people contributed to the writing of this book. I particularly wish to recognize the contributions of Nancy Joyce, Senior Program Manager, Beacon Construction, who authored the project highlights and who served as technical consultant for the entire manuscript. Don Farrell volunteered the efforts of his construction photography firm, Farrell Associates, to provide the photographs used throughout the text.

I thank the following for reviewing the manuscript for this edition: Dr. S. Narayan Bodapati, P.E., Southern Illinois University; John Jarchow, Pima Community College; and Dr. Madan Mehta, University of Texas at Arlington. I also thank the following reviewers of the first edition: James A. Adrian, Bradley University; Jeff Burnett, Washington State University; Charles Richard Cole, Southern College of Technology; Ellery C. Green, University of Arizona; and John Warsowick, Northern Virginia Community College.

Thanks to the following sidebar contributors for their real-world additions to the text: David Lash, Dave Lash and Company; Jeffrey Milo, Jay Cashman, Inc.; Christopher Noble, Hill and Barlow; Kenneth Stowe, George B. H. Macomber Company; and Rory Woolsey, The Wool-Zee Company. I would also like to acknowledge the Wentworth and Roger Williams students for "agreeing" to be class tested on much of the book's content and, in particular, Matthew Viviano, who produced most of the Primavera plots used in the text.

The R. S. Means Company, especially their Engineering Department headed by John Ferguson, was a huge help in furnishing much of the cost data used in the estimating examples in the text.

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Introduction

With the growth of the construction management profession, and the resulting expansion of construction management courses both in the major and as electives in many architectural and engineering school curriculums, a need has arisen to combine the various facets of the profession into one comprehensive text. Current texts either concentrate on a single function—scheduling, estimating, or project control—or cover the profession in an overview of project management.

In addition, practitioners who need a primer on current industry practices will find this text to be a good reference. The text is organized to cover all areas of the construction management industry, with an emphasis on maintaining a balance between theory and practice. Each of the four sections is introduced with background theory and fundamentals, which are followed by practical applications, frequent illustrations, sidebars written by industry professionals, chapter review questions, and a project highlight. The latter is a recurring feature, relating the teaching of each of the four sections of the book to an actual construction project, the recent renovation of two buildings at MIT. By using this text, students and practitioners—designers, owners, contractors, and construction managers—alike will gain knowledge of the building industry and the technical skills required to manage a construction project.

Section One, Construction Project Management, provides an overview of the industry. The roles and responsibilities of construction participants, organization of the project team, and factors affecting the project scope and timeline are all discussed in this section. Team play andconcepts such as bonding, value engineering, and partnering are defined and emphasized. This section prepares the reader for a more thorough study of the major topics that follow: estimating, scheduling, and project control.

Section Two, Estimating, reviews the techniques and methods used in preparing the costs for a construction project. It discusses the quantity takeoff process, the establishment of unit prices, and the adjustment of costs for time and location. The section covers estimating in the context of a project's evolution. It demonstrates that as project information becomes better, the estimate becomes increasingly detailed, thereby feeding information back into the project to support sounder design and construction decisions.

Section Three, Scheduling, addresses the value of schedules and provides examples of different scheduling methods. The network-based Critical Path Method is covered in the most detail. Activity definition, the creation of a logic diagram, the calculation oaf activity durations, and network calculations are all explained. Computer applications and examples of computer output are included.

Section Four, Project Control, concludes the book. This part examines how the estimate and the schedule are used to provide timely information to the owner and other project participants. In the preconstruction stage, this information can be integrated into a work plan that accurately projects resource usage. In the construction phase, this work plan allows the comparison of actual production to planned production and provides feedback to the project team. This section looks at how the integration of the schedule and the estimate forms this work plan. Examples of integrated reports and a sidebar on Computer Integrated Construction complete this section.

Both the organization and the content of this book have been designed to allow it to serve as a useful reference for the practitioner as well as the student. In the classroom, the book will serve well as a teaching tool for the architectural, construction, or civil engineering student. The text provides an overview of all aspects of construction management, with enough practical examples for the student to get a view of the world of construction management. As a reference for the professional, the book is organized so as to allow quick and easy access to information on current tools and practices of the profession—hence its utility to learners and experienced professionals alike.

Acknowledgments

Many people contributed to the writing of this book. I particularly wish to recognize the contributions of Nancy Joyce, Senior Program Manager, Beacon Construction, who authored the project highlights and who served as technical consultant for the entire manuscript. Don Farrell volunteered the efforts of his construction photography firm, Farrell Associates, to provide the photographs used throughout the text.

I thank the following for reviewing the manuscript for this edition: Dr. S. Narayan Bodapati, P.E., Southern Illinois University; John Jarchow, Pima Community College; and Dr. Madan Mehta, University of Texas at Arlington. I also thank the following reviewers of the first edition: James A. Adrian, Bradley University; Jeff Burnett, Washington State University; Charles Richard Cole, Southern College of Technology; Ellery C. Green, University of Arizona; and John Warsowick, Northern Virginia Community College.

Thanks to the following sidebar contributors for their real-world additions to the text: David Lash, Dave Lash and Company; Jeffrey Milo, Jay Cashman, Inc.; Christopher Noble, Hill and Barlow; Kenneth Stowe, George B. H. Macomber Company; and Rory Woolsey, The Wool-Zee Company. I would also like to acknowledge the Wentworth and Roger Williams students for "agreeing" to be class tested on much of the book's content and, in particular, Matthew Viviano, who produced most of the Primavera plots used in the text.

The R. S. Means Company, especially their Engineering Department headed by John Ferguson, was a huge help in furnishing much of the cost data used in the estimating examples in the text.

Read More Show Less

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