Manalive

( 7 )

Overview

How the Great Wind Came to Beacon House
A wind sprang high in the west, like a wave of unreasonable happiness, and tore eastward across England, trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea. In a million holes and corners it refreshed a man like a flagon, and astonished him like a blow. In the inmost chambers of intricate and embowered houses it woke like a domestic explosion, littering the floor with some professor's papers till they seemed ...
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Manalive (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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Overview

How the Great Wind Came to Beacon House
A wind sprang high in the west, like a wave of unreasonable happiness, and tore eastward across England, trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea. In a million holes and corners it refreshed a man like a flagon, and astonished him like a blow. In the inmost chambers of intricate and embowered houses it woke like a domestic explosion, littering the floor with some professor's papers till they seemed as precious as fugitive, or blowing out the candle by which a boy read "Treasure Island" and wrapping him in roaring dark. But everywhere it bore drama into undramatic lives, and carried the trump of crisis across the world. Many a harassed mother in a mean backyard had looked at five dwarfish shirts on the clothes-line as at some small, sick tragedy; it was as if she had hanged her five children. The wind came, and they were full and kicking as if five fat imps had sprung into them; and far down in her oppressed subconscious she half-remembered those coarse comedies of her fathers when the elves still dwelt in the homes of men. Many an unnoticed girl in a dank walled garden had tossed herself into the hammock with the same intolerant gesture with which she might have tossed herself into the Thames; and that wind rent the waving wall of woods and lifted the hammock like a balloon, and showed her shapes of quaint clouds far beyond, and pictures of bright villages far below, as if she rode heaven in a fairy boat. Many a dusty clerk or cleric, plodding a telescopic road of poplars, thought for the hundredth time that they were like the plumes of a hearse; when this invisible energy caught and swung and clashed them round his head like a wreath or salutation of seraphic wings. There was in it something more inspired and authoritative even than the old wind of the proverb; for this was the good wind that blows nobody harm.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781499145878
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/15/2014
  • Pages: 88
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was an English writer. His prolific and diverse output included philosophy, ontology, poetry, play writing, journalism, public lecturing and debating, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton has been called the "prince of paradox". Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories-first carefully turning them inside out." For example, Chesterton wrote "Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it." Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both liberalism and conservatism, saying, "The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected." Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify such a position with Catholicism more and more, eventually converting to Roman Catholicism from Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton's "friendly enemy" according to Time, said of him, "He was a man of colossal genius".
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

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1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 10 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2003

    Hang On!

    What a ride! Looking for a plot? Don't! Just hang on and let this master of the Enlgish language lead you through the most imaginative of journies! And by the end, you'll have discovered something about yourself that you'd never known/seen before. This is a celebration of the sacramentality of living - the joyful unexpected woven deeply in the fabric of life. Enjoy! Enjoy! Enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 29, 2011

    Are you a Manalive?

    This is an older text with typos, but nevertheless, it is a great read. It truely makes one ask, 'Am I a manalive, or have I died long before I have died?'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2011

    Not recommended

    The poor digitizing of this particular version makes a very bad reading experience. The story is delightful and, of course, written by a master. It is too bad that one cannot enjoy this version.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2009

    Man Alive OCR

    The optical scanning of this book is so defective, it is literally unreadable. I don't think there are two uncorrupted sentences in a row. If the other 500,000 books from Google Books are this defective, I can't even guess why B&N even bothered.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 10 of 9 Customer Reviews

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