Mandy

Mandy

by Barbara D. Booth, Jim LaMarche
     
 

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Mandy stared out the window and shivered, She hated the dark; it made her so alone. At night she couldn't sign to her friends or see anyone's lips when they spoke. it felt as if the world ended at the edge of her flashlight beam.

But she looked at Grandma's tear-streaked face and bare collar. The silver pin Grandpa had given her so long ago was lost somewhere in

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Overview

Mandy stared out the window and shivered, She hated the dark; it made her so alone. At night she couldn't sign to her friends or see anyone's lips when they spoke. it felt as if the world ended at the edge of her flashlight beam.

But she looked at Grandma's tear-streaked face and bare collar. The silver pin Grandpa had given her so long ago was lost somewhere in the woods. And even though a stormy night was beginning, Mandy was determined to find it.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The silent world of a deaf child brims with imagined sounds and intriguing observations. As Mandy and her grandmother pass an afternoon baking cookies, looking at family photos and taking a walk, the girl wonders at all the sounds she cannot hear: the rustling of tree branches, cookie dough dropping onto baking sheets. With such intricate, poignant details, Booth--in her debut--illuminates Mandy's world and gently refocuses the reader's visual and aural perceptions. Far less subtle are the predictable events that unfold when Mandy's grandmother loses her cherished pin outdoors just as a storm threatens. Mandy's appeal as an engaging, inquisitive child needs no reinforcement from a cliched tale of heroism, and the narrative falters under its clumsiness. LaMarche's luminescent paintings capture a wealth of emotion, touchingly underscoring the importance of visual expression in nonverbal communication. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Mandy may be missing her sense of hearing, but she is certainly not missing the love of her grandmother. We glimpse them one afternoon and begin to know them quickly. We see them enjoy dancing, cookie making and especially sharing memories through a photo album. They pause at the pictures of Mandy's grandfather who lovingly pins an anniversary circlet on his wife and holds his granddaughter lovingly. We see Mandy's grandmother understanding her limitations and soothing her with sensual experiences. We feel what it is like to be frustrated, confused and afraid, caught in a world without sound. The book's climax shows Mandy braving her fear of darkness to recover the circlet that her grandmother has misplaced. Feeling is well-noted on both levels as well as in the realistic illustrations of LaMarche.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-- Mandy, a deaf girl, overcomes her fear of the dark to find her grandmother's lost pin during a storm. The child's deafness is treated matter-of-factly and explained without any traces of pedantic rhetoric. The book is quite wordy, but the warmth between the grandmother and the child is evident, and is reflected in the illustrations. Subtle use of light and color lends softness to the full-page paintings. While this is not great literature, it's an additional purchase for libraries needing books on grandmothers or conquering fear. --Christine A. Moesch, Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688103392
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/1991
Edition description:
38888 Harper
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.21(w) x 9.33(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
6 Years

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