Manet/Velázquez: The French Taste for Spanish Painting

Overview

This illustrated book accompanies a groundbreaking exhibition - the first of such scale and depth to be organized around this subject - that traces the roots of Modernism in mid-nineteenth-century French Realism. In 1804, at the dawn of the French Empire, there were no more than a handful of Spanish paintings in public collections in France. During the course of the nineteenth century, however, French collectors and museums assembled substantial holdings of works by such Spanish masters as El Greco, Zurbaran, ...
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Overview

This illustrated book accompanies a groundbreaking exhibition - the first of such scale and depth to be organized around this subject - that traces the roots of Modernism in mid-nineteenth-century French Realism. In 1804, at the dawn of the French Empire, there were no more than a handful of Spanish paintings in public collections in France. During the course of the nineteenth century, however, French collectors and museums assembled substantial holdings of works by such Spanish masters as El Greco, Zurbaran, Velazquez, Murillo, and Goya, while French writers and artists - among them Hugo and Baudelaire, Gericault, Delacroix, Millet, Courbet, Degas, and especially Manet - came to understand, appreciate, and even emulate Spanish painting of the Golden Age. Here approximately two hundred works by French and Spanish artists chart the development of this cultural influence and map a fascinating shift in the paradigm of painting, from Idealism to Realism, from Italy to Spain, from Renaissance to Baroque. Above all, these images demonstrate how direct contact with Spanish painting fired the imagination of nineteenth-century French artists and brought about the triumph of Realism in the 1860s, and with it a foundation for modern art.
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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
How 17th-century Spanish painting came to influence late 19th-century French art is brilliantly illuminated in Manet/Velázquez. Spanish paintings, with their blend of mysticism and earthy naturalism, were prized for their scarcity in France at the start of the 19th century, when few had actually been seen. — Hilarie M. Sheets
Publishers Weekly
Masterfully untangling one of the strands of modern painting, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Tinterow and the Mus e d'Orsay's Lacambre bring together 729 illustrations (380 in color) from the Louvre and the Prado. Through an assemblage of magnificent works, from Velazquez's Las Meninas and Manet's Boy with a Sword to works by Zurbaran, Goya, Cassatt and Chasseriau, they chart the influence of Spanish on French (and, via Paris, American) artists from the mid-19th century to 1915 and trace the institutional routes Spanish art traveled. Among the 11 essays from various scholars, two appendixes and a chronology of the included work are Tinterow's overview of art during Napoleon's empire, Maria de los Santos Garcia and Javier Portus Perez's essay on the Prado's origins and H. Barbara Weinberg's close views of Whistler, Eakins, Chase, Sargent and Anshutz. Casual readers (and artists) will have enough to take in just having these works systematically presented between the same covers, while the essays connect the dots of influence. The price is steep, but the illustrations are richly printed, and the scholarship is first rate. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Accompanying an unprecedented exhibition coming from the Mus e d'Orsay, Paris, and being shown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (until June 8, 2003), this publication features the phenomenon of Hispanisme-enthusiasm for Spanish things-that ensued during the 19th century after Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Spain. In 13 well-written, extensively footnoted, and beautifully illustrated essays, organizing curators and prominent scholars show how events in Spain and France precipitated and shaped the vogue for Spanish art, thereby causing an aesthetic paradigm shift from the idealism of Italian Renaissance masters toward the realism of Spanish artists of the Golden Age and the development of Modernism. They examine the influence of El Greco, Goya, Murillo, Velazquez, Francisco Zurbaran, and others on French and American artists, including but not limited to Degas, Delacroix, Manet, Cassatt, Eakins, Sargent, and Whistler. Seville's artistic heritage during the French occupation, the origins of the Prado museum, the Spanish Gallery of Louis-Philippe, the history and collections of the Hispanic Society of America, and other related topics also are covered. Worth acquiring for its groundbreaking scholarship, 729 reproductions (380 in color), historical chronology, extensive bibliography, and catalog with entries documenting the histories of more than 200 artworks, this resource belongs in all art research collections encompassing early modern European art.-Cheryl Ann Lajos, Free Lib. of Philadelphia Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300098808
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Publication date: 2/20/2003
  • Series: Metropolitan Museum of Art Series
  • Pages: 608
  • Product dimensions: 9.38 (w) x 12.30 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Curators of the Exhibition
Directors' Foreword
Sponsor's Statement
Acknowledgments
List of Lenders
Contributors to the Catalogue
Raphael Replaced: The Triumph of Spanish Painting in France 3
The Discovery of the Spanish School in France 67
Seville's Artistic Heritage during the French Occupation 93
The Origins of the Museo del Prado 115
Goya and France 139
Goya and the French Romantics 161
The Galerie Espagnole of Louis-Philippe 175
From Ziegler to Courbet: Painting, Art Criticism, and the Spanish Trope under Louis-Philippe 191
Manet and Spain 203
American Artists' Taste for Spanish Painting 259
A Legacy of Spanish Art for America: Archer M. Huntington and The Hispanic Society of America 307
App. 1 Nineteenth-Century French Copies after Spanish Old Masters 327
App. 2 The Dresden Remains of the Galerie Espagnole: A Fresh Look (at the) Back 343
Chronology 353
Catalogue: Spanish Artists (1-90) 407
Catalogue: French Artists (91-199) 467
Catalogue: American Artists (200-226) 521
Bibliography 543
Index 577
Photograph Credits 592
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