The Manga Guide to Electricity

( 2 )

Overview

Rereko is just your average high-school girl from Electopia, the land of electricity, but she's totally failed her final electricity exam! Now she has to go to summer school on Earth. And this time, she has to pass

Luckily, her ever-patient tutor Hikaru is there to help. Join them in the pages of The Manga Guide to Electricity as Rereko examines everyday electrical devices like flashlights, heaters, and circuit breakers, and learns the meaning of abstract concepts like voltage, ...

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Overview

Rereko is just your average high-school girl from Electopia, the land of electricity, but she's totally failed her final electricity exam! Now she has to go to summer school on Earth. And this time, she has to pass

Luckily, her ever-patient tutor Hikaru is there to help. Join them in the pages of The Manga Guide to Electricity as Rereko examines everyday electrical devices like flashlights, heaters, and circuit breakers, and learns the meaning of abstract concepts like voltage, potential, current, resistance, conductivity, and electrostatic force.

The real-world examples that you'll find in The Manga Guide to Electricity will teach you:

  • What electricity is, how it works, how it's created, and how it can be used
  • The relationship between voltage, current, and resistance (Ohm's law)
  • Key electrical concepts like inductance and capacitance
  • How complicated components like transformers, semiconductors, diodes, and transistors work
  • How electricity produces heat and the relationship between current and magnetic fields

If thinking about how electricity works really fries your brain, let The Manga Guide to Electricity teach you all things electrical in a shockingly fun way.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593271978
  • Publisher: No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
  • Publication date: 3/1/2009
  • Series: Manga Guide to Science Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 413,153
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Kazuhiro Fujitaki is a lecturer at the Tokyo Metropolitan Vocational Skills Development Center. He has written a number of books on electrical engineering and runs a website offering useful information about Japan's qualifying examinations for electrical technicians.

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Customer Reviews

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  • Posted November 28, 2014

    A cute story I would recommend to anyone who wants to understand electricity.

    This story will help a person unfamiliar with electricity to immediately understand how electricity works. It also contains many amusing events to keep your interest.

    I like how it starts out with the aspects of electricity that most people are familiar with, including the electricity usage values found on the nameplate of a product and the electrical service entrance panel for a house or apartment. Then it takes you into higher and higher concepts of electricity, including a very good description of how a transistor works. Anyone who reads it will have a much better understanding of how electricity works and how it is used.

    The one thing that is confusing to those who do not live in Japan is the very low total current of the main service breaker, and the whole-house ground-fault interrupter. These recent changes in Japan are not explained in the book. The tsunami destroyed much of Japan's power generation, so many dwellings now have very low service entrance currents (e.g. 20 or 30 amps, instead of the 120 to 200 amps in the US.) to avoid rotating blackouts.

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  • Posted April 5, 2009

    Electricity With No Math

    The irrepressible Japanese Manga is back, this time talking about electricity. The series from the No Starch Press uses the genre of Japanese cartoons to teach serious topics in science and technology.

    The book starts with an overview of the physical nature of electricity, a description of positive and negative charge, and the units used to measure electricity including the difference between current flow (amperage) and current force (volts). It introduces electricity in the many forms we use and experience daily, including static electricity, direct current as found in flashlights, and electrical circuits such as one finds in buildings. It introduces Ohm's law, the basic relationship between current flow, current force, and the resistance of the electrical conductor.

    It then proceeds to discuss many other practical topics including the relationship between current, resistance, and heat generation, and how electricity generates magnetic fields. Fleming's right- and left-hand rules are described. Basic components of circuits found in devices such as MP3 players or televisions are presented. These include coils, capacitors, and solid state devices such as diodes, transistors, temperature and optical sensors.

    There is a six page index. There are no problems to solve in the book, it has no significant math. One of the strengths of the series that while the basic concepts are introduced through the story told via the cartoons, additional information of a more detailed nature is available at the end of each chapter. This provides an opportunity for the reader who is interested in further study on a topic. e.g. after the story in the cartoon section describes the chemical reactions that provide energy for dry cell batteries, the prose at the end of the chapter discusses the variety of ways in which power plants powered by heat, nuclear processes, wind, and water create energy for our use.

    This is a cleverly written book, quite practical in nature. (It even discussed circuit breakers!) It is an excellent introduction for the young student interested in learning more about electricity, and would also be appropriate for the adult with no math or science background.

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