Mangaboom

Mangaboom

by Charlotte Pomerantz, Anita Lobel
     
 

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Daniel is walking in the woods one day when he comes upon the biggest mango tree he's ever seen. But even more amazing is it occupant, a lady giant named Mangaboom. She's nineteen feet tall. She speaks Spanish and English. She like to skinny-dip and turn cartwheels on the beach.

Holy mo, Daniel says. He's never met a giant before, much less one as fabulous as

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Overview

Daniel is walking in the woods one day when he comes upon the biggest mango tree he's ever seen. But even more amazing is it occupant, a lady giant named Mangaboom. She's nineteen feet tall. She speaks Spanish and English. She like to skinny-dip and turn cartwheels on the beach.

Holy mo, Daniel says. He's never met a giant before, much less one as fabulous as Mangaboom. As it turns out, Daniel and his new friend have a lot in common—which is more than Mangaboom's three bumbling gentlemen suitors can say.

Here is a story as charming and larger-than-life as Mangaboom herself. Equally captiviating are the exquisite painting for this original tale.Daniel befriends a gentle giant who lives in a mango tree. As it turns out, Daniel and his nineteen-foot-tall friend have a lot in common—which is more than Mangaboom's three bumbling gentleman suitors can say. An original story with the flavor of a Puerto Rican folktale, with spectacular paintings by the Caldecott honor medalist.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
"Holy mo," says young Daniel when he first meets Mangaboom, who is 19 feet tall, lives in a mango tree, has a penchant for high heels and doesn't put up with any guff (dispatching with a trio of boorish suitors, for instance, she points out that, at 682 pounds, "Nobody tells me what to do"). As their unusual friendship blossoms, the boy learns that the giantess also speaks Spanish (hence the smattering of Spanish words throughout the text) and is constantly trying to outmaneuver a matchmaker of an aunt. Unsurprisingly, Mangaboom eventually finds a mate who appreciates her just the way she is. Although Pomerantz's (Here Comes Henny) storytelling contains strong flashes of humor (the tea Mangaboom's aunt hosts to introduce her unusual niece to three "eligible giants" is very amusing) and a clear message about self-acceptance, overall this is a decidedly peculiar offering, burdened by its details. The tale is overlong and could have used a good pruning, and its quirkiness seems forced. Even Lobel's (The Cat and the Cook and Other Fables of Krylov) lush and vigorous artwork-which does the larger-than-life heroine proud, filling page after page with the flamboyant feminist giantess and her antics-can't boost this story out of the category of oddity.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"Holy mo," says young Daniel when he first meets Mangaboom, who is 19 feet tall, lives in a mango tree, has a penchant for high heels and doesn't put up with any guff (dispatching with a trio of boorish suitors, for instance, she points out that, at 682 pounds, "Nobody tells me what to do"). As their unusual friendship blossoms, the boy learns that the giantess also speaks Spanish (hence the smattering of Spanish words throughout the text) and is constantly trying to outmaneuver a matchmaker of an aunt. Unsurprisingly, Mangaboom eventually finds a mate who appreciates her just the way she is. Although Pomerantz's (Here Comes Henny) storytelling contains strong flashes of humor (the tea Mangaboom's aunt hosts to introduce her unusual niece to three "eligible giants" is very amusing) and a clear message about self-acceptance, overall this is a decidedly peculiar offering, burdened by its details. The tale is overlong and could have used a good pruning, and its quirkiness seems forced. Even Lobel's (The Cat and the Cook and Other Fables of Krylov) lush and vigorous artworkwhich does the larger-than-life heroine proud, filling page after page with the flamboyant feminist giantess and her anticscan't boost this story out of the category of oddity. Ages 5-up. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Wendy Mann
Pomerantz creates a magical tale of giants in trees, friendship and love. From the Mango tree where "Mangaboom" lives to the "Auntie" who holds tea parties for matchmaking, this story unfolds with creativity and some surprises. Mangaboom receives mail through a large shoe at the bottom of her tree. One day the shoe brings a boy to her tree for a visit. The boy learns from Mangaboom about her world and about the secret admirer who sends her letters. When the boy leaves, the secret admirer finally meets Mangaboom at her tree.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3An original and entertaining story with a traditional fairy-tale flavor. Even before the title page, readers encounter a young lad beholding a rather unusual sight: a very big pink slipper with a bright yellow bow that serves as a tree-house mail box. By the second page of illustration, the boy steps into the shoe, takes the letters in hand, and is hauled up into a mango tree. As the boldly colored paintings indicate, the recipient of the letters is indeed larger than life, a lady giant named Mangaboom who stands 19-feet tall and is very congenial. The two immediately strike up a friendship and plunge into the task at handfinding a suitable suitor for Mangaboom. Neither Tito nor Fito nor Hernando-Fernando, giant suitors presented at her aunt's afternoon tea, will do. Fortunately, Grizwaldo, a love-letter writing giant who lives in a jacaranda tree, turns out to be the love of her life, and they live happily ever after. Mangaboom is a mix of female determination and femininity, strong enough to choose the man of her dreams while wearing a dress adorned with lace and flowers. The large, lush, watercolor-and-gouache paintings are filled with textures and hues that evoke the tropical setting. Written in short paragraphs with lots of dialogue, this tale will make an amusing read-aloud.Susan Pine, New York Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Although this tale is somewhat disjointed, its tender bonhomie compensates. A boy, Daniel, happens across an enormous pink slipper at the foot of a huge mango tree. He clambers in and is hoisted aloft, where he meets Mangaboom—all 19 feet and 682 pounds of her—who tells him of her favorite pastimes: skinny-dipping and turning cartwheels. Two pieces of mail arrive with Daniel: an invitation to her aunt's for tea with three bachelor giants, and a love letter from someone named Grizwaldo. He begs Mangaboom to write, but before she can retrieve his address on the envelope, her goat eats it up. Crestfallen, Mangaboom heads off with Daniel to tea, where her suitors turn out to be dreadful rubes. Happily for Mangaboom, but unhappily for any potential drama surrounding the lost address, Grizwaldo writes the next day, saying he'll drop by that evening. Daniel takes his leave, though not without getting a glimpse of Grizwaldo (who looks a great deal like a giant Daniel). On the saucily suggestive last page, it looks as though they'll go skinny-dipping that night.

Snippets of Spanish give this story an exotic air, and the affection the storyteller has for her characters is evident, even though a plot is not. Lobel's gouaches give a heroic touch to the proceedings, with Mangaboom's colossalness often bleeding right off the page.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688129569
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.37(w) x 12.31(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
AD350L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 Years

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