Manhater

Manhater

by Danielle Pafunda
     
 

Poetry. "Danielle Pafunda is a sick twist. I read her for seer and scar. She sees and scars, most especially my insides. MANHATER doesn't hate so much as it confounds. It mixes me up: finding-me-with its scathing, tight phrases, bit-off and spit-out with the kind of venom you don't manufacture because you're born-with. It finds-me-with its horrormother, a

Overview


Poetry. "Danielle Pafunda is a sick twist. I read her for seer and scar. She sees and scars, most especially my insides. MANHATER doesn't hate so much as it confounds. It mixes me up: finding-me-with its scathing, tight phrases, bit-off and spit-out with the kind of venom you don't manufacture because you're born-with. It finds-me-with its horrormother, a figure both ick and sympathet-ick, both grotesque and ingrown, mommydearest of nightmare and mirror. It finds-me-with its plates of illness—china and petri, 'shard and glisten'—and with its ex-lovers: weep boys and beardeds and dog ones. Always, Pafunda finds-me-with something. I'm always ashamed. And always, always I'm smiling."—Kirsten Kaschock

"Danielle Pafunda is at it again, thank goodness: saying what almost no one else will say, as only she can say it. Read her for the reality check; come back for the rhetorical rocket fuel. These poems ask: Can you recognize yourself in Mommy? Can you recognize yourself in the mirror? MANHATER collects the language of the body, the body, the body. The world lurking in its pages 'expels symmetry,' 'surveys...the sunrise / barf,' invites the 'bitch seizure,' will 'shard and glisten' for you. Enter and 'wait for the tremble.'"—Evie Shockley

"To read Danielle Pafunda's MANHATER is to occupy a world of exuberantly dreadful, vibrantly horrifying sentences about decay, death, 'penumbral scuzz,' and the parasites that live in the parasites that live in the basest bodies among us. In Pafunda's mantis-like narrator, I hear 'jolly worms' and 'sarcophagus parties.' I hear exhilaration in destruction, in 'gasping bodies of doom.' The speaker in these poems might destroy the love she touches, but in the process she excretes with a syntax that's dazzlingly scary: a direct delivery of humanimal emission; an infection of flesh and body; sentences that discharge what's magically repulsive in carcass, fungus, milk, blood, and goo. Here there is composition in decomposition, spasms of sparkle and rot."—Daniel Borzutzky

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lifting a page from Plath’s book of tricks, Pafunda comes out swinging in her fourth book with poems that tackle that other half of the parental nightmare, Mommy. “Mommy must eat,” she writes in the book’s opening sequence, because “every morning/ comes hard into the room and frisks you to death.” By stitching this infantile name to her own hem, Pafunda exposes the conflicts of motherhood: her lust and refusal to carry herself as a symbol of fecundity make for some frightening conflations. In the same poem where “Mommy’s brood wails,” Pafunda asks herself how long it’s been “since she had her hand/ down a woebegone hunk’s steamy front” and tells us with a grin that “Mommy’s fist is popping her frame.” For Pafunda, the body following birth is both a source of revelry and disgust, and she likes to welcome us in with one hand and warn us away with the other. “There is a pit,” she writes, “in which worms have grown/ as thick as my wrist.” A mother’s inner life in this book is rife with passionate ambivalence. (Sept.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780981980843
Publisher:
Dusie Press
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Pages:
66
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.30(d)

Meet the Author


Danielle Pafunda is the author of Natural History Rape Museum (Bloof Books, 2013), MANHATER (Dusie Press, 2012), IATROGENIC: THEIR TESTIMONIES (Noemi Press, 2010), My Zorba (Bloof Books 2008), and Pretty Young Thing (Soft Skull Press, 2005). Her poems have appeared in three editions of Best American Poetry. Her work has been anthologized in BEAUTY IS A VERB: THE POETRY OF DISABILITY (Cinco Puntos Press, 2011), GURLESQUE: THE NEW GRRLY, GROTESQUE, BURLESQUE POETICS (Saturnalia Books, 2010) and NOT FOR MOTHERS ONLY: CONTEMPORARY POEMS ON CHILD-GETTING & CHILD REARING (Fence Books, 2007). She is an Assistant Professor of Gender and Women's Studies and English at the University of Wyoming.

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