Manhattan Skyscrapers: 3rd Edition / Edition 3

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Overview

What do you picture when you think of New York City? For most, it is the city's distinctive skyline, made famous bycountless movies and photographs. Everyone in Manhattan, whether first-time visitor or longtime resident, experiences the awe of gazing up at the soaring stone, steel, and glass towers of Wall Street or Midtown, and wonders how those structures came to be built. First published in 1999, Manhattan Skyscrapers was the first book to document the most important peaks in the city's concrete canyons. From the earliest skyscrapers built in thecity—such as the 1896 American Tract Society Building—to the most well known, including the Woolworth, Empire State, and Chrysler buildings, the book has become the definitive reference work on the Big Apple's skyline. Now available in a revised third edition, Manhattan Skyscrapers presents more than a century's worth of New York's most fascinating and important buildings. Each skyscraper is presented with informative and entertaining texts by New York Times contributor Eric Nash, a striking full-page photograph by architectural photographer Norman McGrath, archival images, interior views, and architectural drawings.

In addition to the eighty-five buildings documented in previous versions of the book, Manhattan Skyscrapers showcases eight of the most exciting new skyscrapers built in the past few years. These wonderfully diverse additions to the city—the New York Times Building by Renzo Piano, the Standard Hotel byPolshek Partnership Architects, 7 World Trade Center by SOM, the Blue Tower by Bernard Tschumi, Bank of America Tower by Cook + Fox, 11 Times Square by FXFOWLE, 200 West Street by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, and 425 Fifth Avenue by Michael Graves—give an indication of how the city continues to evolve in the twenty-first century. Manhattan Skyscrapers is an indispensable book for both the serious student of architecture and the casual collector of all things New York.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Covering just over 100 years, Nash and McGrath offer New Yorkers a chance to take another look at buildings they may have stopped noticing. A chronological arrangement plucks buildings from their context and reveals a century's seismic shifts. The Metropolitan Life Insurance Tower (1909), essentially a double-sized reproduction of the Campanile of St. Mark's, gives way to the glass monoliths that today toggle between monumentality and disappearance, underscoring how these "Cathedrals of Commerce" (like the actual Cathedrals they replaced) tell stories about men whose ingenuity drove American capitalism and technology. Nash, who writes for The New York Times, is no wordsmith, but he has a knack for finding the perfect quote: the architect of the GE Building defends his Gothic radio-wave-topped design by saying its lines and curves are "intended to convey the directness and penetration of radio itself," while the head of the Real Estate Board states flatly that the buildings that went up at the end of World War II are modern, "Primarily because they are air-conditioned." Along with the excellent McGrath, Nash takes familiar icons of the New York skyline and makes them new again. (Sept.)
Ted Loos
Appreciating the Empire State Building or the Chrysler Building is easy: their greatness is agreed upon. It is a lot harder to say something intelligent about the hulking Marriott Marquis Hotel in Times Square. In ''Manhattan Skyscrapers,'' Eric P. Nash manages to do both. The book, which features 75 extant examples built since the skyscraper was invented a century ago, is admirably grounded in the details of stone, steel and glass... The full-page photographs by Norman McGrath help the reader better understand both good and great buildings.
The New York Times Book Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568989679
  • Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
  • Publication date: 8/18/2010
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 931,262
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 12.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric P. Nash has been a researcher and writer for the New York Times since 1986. He is the author of several books about architecture and design.

Norman McGrath's long career includes a wide variety of work for many well-known architects and designers. Every major architectural publication has featured his images.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
American Tract Society Building 1
Bayard-Condict Building 3
Park Row Building 5
Flatiron Building 7
West Street Building (now 90 West Street) 11
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower 13
Bankers Trust Company Building (originally 14 Wall Street) 15
Woolworth Building 17
Municipal Building 21
Candler Building 23
Equitable Building 25
Bush Tower 27
Shelton Towers Hotel (now Marriott East Side Hotel) 29
American Radiator Building 31
Ritz Tower 33
Paramount Building 35
Barclay-Vesey Building 37
Fred F. French Building 39
Beekman Tower (originally Panhellenic Tower) 41
Tudor City 43
Hearst Magazine Building (originally International Magazine Building) 45
Chanin Building 47
One Fifth Avenue 49
Helmsley Building (originally New York Central Building) 51
Fuller Building 53
Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower (now Republic National Bank) 55
Downtown Athletic Club 57
Daily News Building 59
40 Wall Street (originally the Bank of Manhattan Company Building) 61
Chrysler Building 63
San Remo Apartments (originally San Remo Hotel) 67
Riverside Church 69
120 Wall Street 71
500 Fifth Avenue 73
Empire State Building 75
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel 79
McGraw-Hill Building 81
General Electric Building (originally RCA Victor Building) 83
City Bank Farmers Trust Company Building 85
Cities Service Building (now 70 Pine Street) 87
One Wall Street (originally Irving Trust Company Building) 89
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, North Building 91
Rockefeller Center 93
100 Park Avenue 97
United Nations Secretariat 99
Lever House 103
Seagram Building 105
Time & Life Building 109
Union Carbide Building (now Chase Manhattan Bank) 111
Chase Manhattan Plaza 113
Pan Am Building (now Met Life Building) 115
CBS Building 117
Silver Towers (originally University Plaza) 119
Marine Midland Bank Building (now 140 Broadway) 121
General Motors Building 123
One Astor Plaza 125
XYZ Buildings: Exxon, McGraw-Hill, and Celanese Buildings 127
W. R. Grace Building 131
1 and 2 World Trade Center 135
One Liberty Plaza (originally U.S. Steel Building) 137
1 and 2 UN Plaza 139
Citicorp Center 141
Trump Tower 143
IBM Building 145
AT&T Building (now Sony Building) 147
Marriott Marquis Hotel 149
Lipstick Building 151
425 Lexington Avenue 153
Worldwide Plaza 155
1585 Broadway (originally Solomon Equities Building) 157
Bertelsmann Building (originally 1540 Broadway) 159
712 Fifth Avenue 161
World Financial Center 163
Four Seasons Hotel 167
4 Times Square (Conde Nast Building) 169
Bibliography 171
Glossary 172
Credits 174
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 25, 2012

    Excellent as the first with many new updated addition.

    High quality as the first edition but a must as it is has many more pages with many new additions.

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