Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking: Cookbooks and Gender in Modern America [NOOK Book]

Overview

In Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking, Jessamyn Neuhaus offers a perceptive and piquant analysis of the tone and content of American cookbooks published between the 1790s and the 1960s, adroitly uncovering the cultural assumptions and anxieties—particularly about gender and domesticity—they contain.

More than a history of the cookbook, this work provides an absorbing and enlightening account of gender and food in modern America.

"An engaging analysis... Neuhaus provides a rich ...

See more details below
Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking: Cookbooks and Gender in Modern America

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.99
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$30.00 List Price

Overview

In Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking, Jessamyn Neuhaus offers a perceptive and piquant analysis of the tone and content of American cookbooks published between the 1790s and the 1960s, adroitly uncovering the cultural assumptions and anxieties—particularly about gender and domesticity—they contain.

More than a history of the cookbook, this work provides an absorbing and enlightening account of gender and food in modern America.

"An engaging analysis... Neuhaus provides a rich and well-researched cultural history of American gender roles through her clever use of cookbooks."— History: Reviews of New Books

"Even if you missed Jell-O salads or Pu-Pu platters, after reading Neuhaus buying a cookbook will never be the same."— American Historical Review

"The entire book is well researched and documented, helping readers to see that cookbooks have supported America's dominant ideologies about gender."— Gastronomica

"An excellent addition to the history of women's roles in America, as well as to the history of cookbooks."— Choice

"The book has many strengths, including excellent research and cogent presentation... Good enough to entice more scholars to step into the kitchen."— Journal of American History

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
This is a fascinating history that delves into the world of home cooking, cookbooks, and changing perceptions about males and females in food production, and is recommended for any college-level American history or culinary arts program.
Choice
An excellent addition to the history of women's roles in America, as well as to the history of cookbooks.
History: Reviews of New Books
An engaging analysis... Neuhaus provides a rich and well-researched cultural history of American gender roles through her clever use of cookbooks.

— Sarah Eppler Janda

Christian Science Monitor - Julie Finnin Day
Have you ever wondered why women's cooking tends to be tired and routine, while men can make culinary magic with hotdogs, omelettes, and fried potatoes? Or why juicy steaks are man-food, while dainty salads are for women? These stereotypes may sit like a rock in the belly, but the message has been reinforced over the past century in American cookbooks, says Jessamyn Neuhaus, author of Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking. She explores generations of cookery instruction and finds they didn't stop at recipes for Jell-O salad and tuna casserole. From Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking to The I Hate to Cook Book, cookbooks have long told women more than how much flour to put in their devil's food cake. They have reflected and reinforced social attitudes about the distinct roles of men and women... Readers—especially veteran home cooks—are likely to find Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking worth tasting.
History: Reviews of New Books - Sarah Eppler Janda
An engaging analysis... Neuhaus provides a rich and well-researched cultural history of American gender roles through her clever use of cookbooks.
Women's Review of Books - Barbara Haber
Neuhaus examines a huge number of both well-known and obscure cookbooks, as well as hard-to-find magazine articles and offers persuasive evidence about the culture of the period.
Gastronomica - Anne L. Bower
The entire book is well researched and documented, helping readers to see that cookbooks have supported America's dominant ideologies about gender.
American Historical Review - Eileen Boris
Even if you missed Jell-O salads or Pu-Pu platters, after reading Neuhaus buying a cookbook will never be the same.
Christian Science Monitor
Have you ever wondered why women's cooking tends to be tired and routine, while men can make culinary magic with hotdogs, omelettes, and fried potatoes? Or why juicy steaks are man-food, while dainty salads are for women? These stereotypes may sit like a rock in the belly, but the message has been reinforced over the past century in American cookbooks, says Jessamyn Neuhaus, author of Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking. She explores generations of cookery instruction and finds they didn't stop at recipes for Jell-O salad and tuna casserole. From Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking to The I Hate to Cook Book, cookbooks have long told women more than how much flour to put in their devil's food cake. They have reflected and reinforced social attitudes about the distinct roles of men and women... Readers—especially veteran home cooks—are likely to find Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking worth tasting.

— Julie Finnin Day

Women's Review of Books
Neuhaus examines a huge number of both well-known and obscure cookbooks, as well as hard-to-find magazine articles and offers persuasive evidence about the culture of the period.

— Barbara Haber

Choice

An excellent addition to the history of women's roles in America, as well as to the history of cookbooks.

Journal of American History
The book has many strengths, including excellent research and cogent presentation... Good enough to entice more scholars to step into the kitchen.
Gastronomica
The entire book is well researched and documented, helping readers to see that cookbooks have supported America's dominant ideologies about gender.

— Anne L. Bower

American Historical Review
Even if you missed Jell-O salads or Pu-Pu platters, after reading Neuhaus buying a cookbook will never be the same.

— Eileen Boris

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781421407326
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 1/21/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Jessamyn Neuhaus is an associate professor of U.S. history and popular culture at SUNY Plattsburgh. She is the author of Housework and Housewives in Modern American Advertising: Married to the Mop.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Contents:

Acknowledgments

Introduction

"The Purpose of a Cookery Book"PART ONE

"A Most Enchanting Occupation":

Cookbooks in Early and Modern America, 1796–1941
One

From Family Receipts to Fannie Farmer:

Cookbooks in the United States, 1796–1920


Two

Recipes for a New Era:

Food Trends, Consumerism, Cooks, and Cookbooks


Three

"Cooking Is Fun":

Women's Home Cookery As Art, Science, and Necessity


Four

Ladylike Lunches and Manly Meals:

The Gendering of Food and Cooking
PART TWO

"You are First and Foremost Homemakers:

Cookbooks and the Second World War
Five

Lima Loaf and Butter Stretchers

Six

"Ways and Means for War Days":

The Cookbook-Scrapbook Compiled by Maude Reid


Seven

"The Hand That Cuts the Ration Coupon May Win the War":

Women's Home-Cooked Patriotism
PART THREE

The Cooking Mystique:

Cookbooks and Gender, 1945–1963
Eight

The Betty Crocker Era

Nine

"King of the Kitchen":

Food and Cookery Instruction for Men


Ten

The Most Important Meal:

Women's Home Cooking, Domestic Ideology, and Cookbooks


Eleven

"A Necessary Bore":

Contradictions in the Cooking Mystique
Conclusion

From Julia Child to Cooking.comNotes

Essay on Sources

Index

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

This detailed analysis of the gendered nature of American cookbooks surveys more cookbooks than any other work I'm aware of. The clear and consistent thesis is that these cookbooks reflect and reinforce a long-standing ideology of domesticity that situates women as the primary cooks, caretakers, and nurturers of the idealized nuclear family. With sound scholarship and a focus on prescriptive food literature, Manly Meals makes an original and useful contribution to our understanding of how gender roles are institutionalized and perpetuated.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)