Manners Mash-Up: A Goofy Guide to Good Behavior: A Goofy Guide to Good Behavior

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Overview

To pick, or not to pick? This etiquette question and loads more are answered in fourteen hilarious spreads by fourteen talented, well-loved artists. Each spread illustrates a setting from kids' everyday lives (and the potential blunders they may commit there) and the text emphasizes the right behavior.

From the dinner table to the doctor's office, from the playground to the pool, this irreverent book will help kids navigate any social scenario ...

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Overview

To pick, or not to pick? This etiquette question and loads more are answered in fourteen hilarious spreads by fourteen talented, well-loved artists. Each spread illustrates a setting from kids' everyday lives (and the potential blunders they may commit there) and the text emphasizes the right behavior.

From the dinner table to the doctor's office, from the playground to the pool, this irreverent book will help kids navigate any social scenario with utmost grace. Or at least without too much embarrassment.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This follow-up to Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? (2006) and Knock Knock (2007) rounds up 14 of the usual suspects—the most gifted illustrators working today—and gives them one spread to explain the hows and whys of etiquette. Although a few contributors let their pedagogical instincts get the best of them, overall the results are top-notch. A few artists focus on a single type of troublesome behavior: Henry Cole empathetically depicts "Don't stare," acknowledging the heady temptations of "the new kid," "funny outfits," and "people's bottoms." Tao Nyeu constructs a wryly demure, woodland-themed sampler to admonish readers "Please don't pick in public"—as in one's nose, wedgie, teeth, etc. Most spreads are dedicated to guidelines for various environments, such as the cafeteria (Lynn Munsinger lets loose with an endearing cast of pigs), bus, playground, or doctor's office ("Don't X-ray your little brother," notes Sophie Blackall, in a spread that makes the most of her creepy aesthetic). If there's a first among equals, it's Tedd Arnold, who uses the "The All-Alien Slimeball Championship" to teach the essentials of sportsmanship. Nuff said. Ages 5–8. (Feb.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Fourteen well-known children's book illustrators are each given a spread to impart etiquette for various situations. For example, Frank Morrison takes on rules to live by when visiting someone else's home, while Adam Rex uses ghoulish characters to show how to behave at the dinner table. Though there are way too many "don'ts," the humor in many of the illustrations lessens the emphasis on the admonishments. Some children will get a kick out of Henry Cole's advice not to stare at people's bottoms. Others will be amused by Tao Nyeu's embroidery, which looks innocent on the surface, but careful reading reveals a hippo who is picking his nose (don't!) and a rabbit who is picking his belly-button lint (another don't!). While many pages are too detailed for a class read-aloud, the book is ideal for small groups or one-on-one sharing and discussion.—Maggie Chase, Boise State University, ID
Kirkus Reviews

The advice in this compendium is completely straightforward: In the cafeteria, "don't take food from others' trays"; on the playground, "Always watch out for the little ones." The delivery, however, is ridiculously, hilariously varied, as 14 illustrators each take a double-page spread and sprinkle those gentle aphorisms among madcap images. Henry Cole illustrates "Don't stare at" with items it is impossible not to—the hairy wart, the plumber's crack and the school receptionist, with cat's-eye glasses and long red fingernails, wearing her bra on the outside of her blouse. Tao Nyeu's beautifully embroidered pages exhort the cute animals therein not to pick their scabs, their belly-button lint or their teeth in public. Adam Rex has a different take entirely on "Table Manners," with a John Waters–like Dr. Frankenstein at the table with Igor ("don't slouch") and a three-headed boy stuffing all his mouths full. At the end, each illustrator recounts personal manners mishaps, complete with self-portraits or photos. Good advice waggishly packaged and not completely tasteful—a winner.(Informational picture book. 5-9)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803734807
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/17/2011
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 305,983
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    Children Loved It!!

    My grandsons loved the book, they read it out loud to each other

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