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Man's Search for Meaning - with New Foreward
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Man's Search for Meaning - with New Foreward

4.4 70
by Viktor E. Frankl, William J. Winslade (Afterword), Harold S. Kushner (Foreword by), Ilse Lasch (Translator)
 

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Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated

Overview

Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

At the time of Frankl's death in 1997, Man's Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a "book that made a difference in your life" found Man's Search for Meaning among the ten most influential books in America.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
One of the great books of our time. —Harold S. Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People

"One of the outstanding contributions to psychological thought in the last fifty years."—Carl R. Rogers (1959)

"An enduring work of survival literature." —New York Times

"An accessible edition of the enduring classic. The spiritual account of the Holocaust and the description of logotherapy meets generations' need for hope."—Donna O. Dziedzic (PLA) AAUP Best of the Best Program

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807014295
Publisher:
Beacon Press
Publication date:
06/14/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
165
Sales rank:
1,304
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
15 - 18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Patrick J. Williams
Viktor Frankl's timeless formula for survival. One of the classic psychiatric texts of our time, Man's Search for Meaning is a meditation on the irreducible gift of one's own counsel in the face of great suffering, as well as a reminder of the responsibility each of us owes in valuing the community of our humanity. There are few wiser, kinder, or more comforting challenges than Frankl's.
— Patricia J. Williams, author of Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race
From the Publisher
One of the great books of our time. —Harold S. Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People

"One of the outstanding contributions to psychological thought in the last fifty years."—Carl R. Rogers (1959)

"An enduring work of survival literature." —New York Times

"An accessible edition of the enduring classic. The spiritual account of the Holocaust and the description of logotherapy meets generations' need for hope."—Donna O. Dziedzic (PLA) AAUP Best of the Best Program

Meet the Author

Viktor E. Frankl was professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna Medical School until his death in 1997. His twenty-nine books have been translated into twenty-one languages. During World War II, he spent three years in Auschwitz, Dachau, and other concentration camps.

Harold S. Kushner is rabbi emeritus at Temple Israel in Natick, Massachusetts, and the author of bestselling books including When Bad Things Happen to Good People, Living a Life That Matters, and When All You’ve Ever Wanted Isn’t Enough.

William J. Winslade is a philosopher, lawyer, and psychoanalyst who teaches psychiatry, medical ethics, and medical jurisprudence at the University of Texas Medical School in Galveston.

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Man's Search for Meaning - with New Foreward 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 70 reviews.
jrsedivy More than 1 year ago
I had received "Man's Search For Meaning" a couple of years ago as a gift. Since that time it had languished on my bookshelf, overcome by other priorities. After all, it was written in 1959, so it could wait a bit longer, right? Having just finished this book I really wish I would have made the time earlier. The lessons within could have easily been applied earlier and with great results. This book is simply remarkable. At 165 pages, "Man's Search For Meaning" is lightweight compared to some of my other reads, but this book took me some time to read, not because the subject matter was difficult, but because it really caused me to stop and reflect many a time. Great things really do come in small packages - less is more. "Man's Search For Meaning" is a life changing book that you simply cannot afford to pass up.
The_hibernators More than 1 year ago
Fascinating and short In the first half of this fascinating little book, Frankl describes his years in the concentration camps (including Auschwitz) with the purpose of analyzing the behavior of people in extreme situations. He admits that someone who wasn't there can't give a very detailed or personal account, but a person who WAS there can't give a detached account because they were emotionally involved. I think he did an excellent job of viewing the situation with detachment, considering the situation. This was a really interesting little memoir. The second half of the book introduces his theory of psychoanalysis: logotherapy. Logotherapy is focused on man's search for meaning; in contrast to Freudian theory focusing on man's search for pleasure and Adlerian theory focusing on man's search for power. I think Logotherapy is the most sensible form of psychotherapy I've ever heard of. How can I argue that our happiness depends on our perceiving our own purpose? I admit I felt a little skepticism when he kept bringing up examples of how he'd "cured" someone after only one session--he must have been a particularly clever person to manage that so often. But that aside, I think the technique of finding meaning in a patient's life is rather useful.
Stu-in-Flag More than 1 year ago
In books, in HBR or WSJ articles, in our conversations with each other, we touch on how important it is to have meaning in our work. This book puts it in the most extreme perspective. I found it deeply moving and helpful. I strongly recommend it for anyone at a crossroad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is incredible. The first part of the book justifies the author's place as a knowledgeable psychotherapist and keeps you from thinking he is just some wing nut. The second part explains his teachings, views, and shares some of his experiences which justify again just how knowledgeable the author is. Recommended for anybody going through any life circumstance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow, this book sure makes you understand better how humans can control so much of their lives with positive attitudes. Very well written.
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41Emphatic More than 1 year ago
Why was I learning about Freud in school?! Where was this idea at? Nice quick read.
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Powerful insights!
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This is a great book, should be read by everyone especially in the Psychology field
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This book has helped me realize that I need to make a meaning to my own life, not wait for a meaning to come to it. Regardless of your beliefs, this book helps you find what the meaning of life is for you..
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading some of the other reviews, I don't think my words will do this book justice. It's amazing. Just amazing. I'd also recommend that you buy "When God Stopped Keeping Score." an intimate look at the power of God and forgiveness. Given the chance, it too could change your life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't think my words can do this book justice. All I can say is that it will open your eyes to so many things. I'd also like to suggest "When God Stopped Keeping Score," an intimate look at the power of forgiveness and yet, it's about so much more. I loved every minute of it. Given the chance, it too will change your life.
kimbakristin More than 1 year ago
Concentration camp survivor Viktor Frankl actually began penning part of this inspiring treatise on the power of finding meaning in life--and particularly in suffering--before he was imprisoned at Auschwitz. In it, he shows how those who can find meaning and resolve in even in the most desperate circumstances can rise above their fate. The first part of the book details life in the camps, focusing not on the gas chambers and the other well-documented horrors but instead offering a well-crafted account of the prisoner's exhausting daily life and the skills and fortitude required to cope from hour to hour when there is so little hope. He argues that while no one can avoid suffering, everyone can choose how to respond to their suffering. He provides some truly moving examples of how he and others in the camps were able to find meaning for themselves and do just that, exercising the one freedom that could not be taken from them. The second part of the book is a more academic overview of logotherapy, Frankl's forward-focused brand of personal psychology based on man's search for meaning. This section seems a bit oversimplified at times (especially given what we now know about the biochemistry of the brain), but offers a good grounding for the personal experiences he shares earlier in the book. Overall, a worthwhile and inspiring read.
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