Mansfield Park (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Mansfield Park, by Jane Austen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:

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2004 Soft cover New in New jacket pp. 512.

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Mansfield Park (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

Mansfield Park, by Jane Austen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:

  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

From its sharply satiric opening sentence, Mansfield Park dealas with money and marriage, and how strongly they affect each other. Shy, fragile Fanny Price is the consummate "poor relation." Sent to live with her wealthy uncle Thomas, she clashes with his spoiled, selfish daughters and falls in love with his son. Their lives are further complicated by the arrival of a pair of witty, sophisticated Londoners, whose flair for flirtation collides with the quiet, conservative country ways of Mansfield Park.

Written several years after the early manuscripts that eventually became Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park retains Austen’s familiar compassion and humor but offers a far more complex exploration of moral choices and their emotional consequences.

Amanda Claybaugh is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. She also wrote the Introduction and Notes for the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593081065
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble
  • Publication date: 4/1/2004
  • Series: Barnes & Noble Classics Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 4.13 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.28 (d)

Meet the Author

Amanda Claybaugh is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. She also wrote the Introduction and Notes for the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Biography

In 1801, George Austen retired from the clergy, and Jane, Cassandra, and their parents took up residence in Bath, a fashionable town Jane liked far less than her native village. Jane seems to have written little during this period. When Mr. Austen died in 1805, the three women, Mrs. Austen and her daughters, moved first to Southampton and then, partly subsidized by Jane's brothers, occupied a house in Chawton, a village not unlike Jane's first home. There she began to work on writing and pursued publishing once more, leading to the anonymous publication of Sense and Sensibility in 1811 and Pride and Prejudice in 1813, to modestly good reviews.

Known for her cheerful, modest, and witty character, Jane Austen had a busy family and social life, but as far as we know very little direct romantic experience. There were early flirtations, a quickly retracted agreement to marry the wealthy brother of a friend, and a rumored short-lived attachment -- while she was traveling -- that has not been verified. Her last years were quiet and devoted to family, friends, and writing her final novels. In 1817 she had to interrupt work on her last and unfinished novel, Sanditon, because she fell ill. She died on July 18, 1817, in Winchester, where she had been taken for medical treatment. After her death, her novels Northanger Abbey and Persuasion were published, together with a biographical notice, due to the efforts of her brother Henry. Austen is buried in Winchester Cathedral.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      December 16, 1775
    2. Place of Birth:
      Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      July 18, 1817
    2. Place of Death:
      Winchester, Hampshire, England
    1. Education:
      Taught at home by her father

Read an Excerpt

From Amanda Claybaugh's Introduction to Mansfield Park

Mary Crawford is, or so it seems, the very model of a Jane Austen heroine. Spirited, warm-hearted, and, above all else, witty, she displays all the familiar Austen virtues, and she stands in need of the familiar Austen lessons as well. Like Elizabeth Bennet, the heroine of Pride and Prejudice (1813), she banters archly with the man she is falling in love with, and, like Elizabeth, she must learn to set aside her preconceptions in order to recognize that love. Like Emma Woodhouse, the heroine of Emma (1816), she speaks more brilliantly and speculates more dazzlingly than anyone around her, and, like Emma, she must learn to rein in the wit that tempts her at times to impropriety. But Mary Crawford is not the heroine of Mansfield Park (1814)—Fanny Price is, and therein lies the novel's great surprise. For Fanny differs not merely from Mary, but also from our most basic expectations of what a novel's protagonist should do and be. In Fanny, we have a heroine who seldom moves and seldom speaks, and never errs or alters.

"'I must move,'" Mary announces, "'resting fatigues me'." Before her arrival at Mansfield, she had made a glamorous circuit of winters in London and summers at the country houses of friends, with stops at fashionable watering places in between, and at Mansfield she is no less mobile. A vigorous walker, she soon takes up riding, cantering as soon as she mounts. Fanny, by contrast, has hardly left the grounds of Mansfield since her arrival eight years before, and she is further immobilized by her weakness and timidity. A half-mile walk is beyond her, a ball, she fears, will exhaust her, and she is prostrated by headache after picking roses. She must be lifted onto the horse she was long too terrified to approach, and her exercise consists of being led by a groom.

"'Now, do not be suspecting me of a pun, I entreat,'" says Mary to her listeners, who have not, in fact, caught the joke at all. So dazzling a talker is Mary that she must serve as her own best audience, amusing herself with witticisms the others cannot hear. With a keener eye and a sharper tongue than those around her, Mary sets her words dancing alongside the inanities, vulgarities, and hypocrisies that make up the other characters' speech. Fanny, by contrast, barely speaks at all, and when she does, it is in the silencing language of moral certainty. "'Very indecorous,'" Edmund says of Mary's far more captivating discourse, and Fanny is quick to agree and contribute a judgment of her own: "'and very ungrateful.'" There is little that can be said after that.

"'I will stake my last like a woman of spirit,'" Mary proclaims in the midst of a card game that Fanny had been reluctant to play at all. Mary wins the hand, only to find that it has cost her more than it was worth, and, in doing so, she reminds us that to act is necessarily to risk being wrong. Fanny, by contrast, is always right. "'Fanny is the only one who has judged rightly throughout'"—this is Edmund Bertram speaking to Sir Thomas in the aftermath of the theatricals, but it could just as properly be the narrator at the novel's end. The language of Fanny's right judgment suggests, however, that her moral certainty is a function of her passivity: "'No, indeed, I cannot act,'" she had insisted, and the double meaning of "acting" suggests that Fanny knows not to "act" in a theatrical sense because she never really "acts" at all.

It is in the contrast between Fanny and Mary that we can most clearly see that Mansfield Park is, in the words of the critic Tony Tanner, "a novel about rest and restlessness, stability and change-the moving and the immovable" (Jane Austen, p. 145; see "For Further Reading"). Mansfield Park is hardly the only Austen novel to take as its subject matter a pair of opposed terms, but typically these terms stand in a dynamic relation to one another, each altering the other until a proper synthesis or balance is achieved. In Sense and Sensibility (1811), for instance, the rational Elinor Dashwood and her romantic sister Marianne must each learn from the other to moderate her mode of feeling; similarly, Mr. Darcy must modify his pride and Elizabeth, her prejudice before marriage can unite them. Other of Austen's novels draw careful distinctions within a single term, as when Persuasion (1818) establishes a continuum from the most laudable to the most lamentable instances of conforming to the wishes of others. Mansfield Park stands alone in this regard, for it unequivocally endorses one set of terms and unequivocally condemns the other. Rest has, in this novel, nothing to learn from restlessness, and restlessness can in no way be redeemed.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 196 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(79)

4 Star

(51)

3 Star

(31)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(27)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 198 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2005

    A 16-year-old bookworm

    Ever since I read Pride and Prejudice, I've been completely hooked on to Jane Austen! This is the second novel of hers I read, and I have to say, I liked it even more than Pride and Prejudice (which was awesome!). Fanny's sweet character and manners touched me, and to meet all of the characters and travel along with them in time is a very touching experience, which makes you miss them when you've finished the book, as if you'd let go of old friends. I recommend this book to anyone who likes Jane Austen, or who wants a comfy read.

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 12, 2011

    All mixed up

    Do not download. The pages were all mixed up and in the wrong order.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2005

    I Love This Book!

    I have read all of Jane Austen's novels, and Fanny Price is my favorite heroine. I love her realistic character traits, and gentle nature. Mansfield Park is fantastic. I thought that Austen portrayed life-like characters and plausible events. This novel is still relevant to people's lives today. My only dissappointment is that the ending seemed abrupt. I thought there should be more explanation for Fanny and Edmund. Other than that, I love this book. Highly recommended.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2004

    My Favorite Austen novel yet

    Of the four Austen novels I have read (the others being Emma, Pride and Prejudice, and Sense and Sensibility), Mansfield Park was my favorite. Why? To be frank, though I love Austen's work and would never want to speak badly of it, the heroines in none of her other novels appeals to me as much as Fanny. Emma is too obviously obsessed with social class, and Eliza's apparent high opinion of herself and her abilities annoys me. Fanny is the only heroine who actually sticks to her beliefs. As always, I recommend the movie, but not after you've read the book!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2011

    incomplete version

    this seemed to start just after Crawford's proposal and the text and chapters are not well laid out. i think i will download a paid version.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    TERRIBLE

    There are incorrect words, random letters.
    VERY HARD TO FIGURE OUT THE WORDS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2011

    fantastic read

    i love this book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Good story except for one thing

    I really enjoyed reading this book. The characters and plot were well developed. I loved Fanny and Edmund. I wanted them to find true happiness so badly. My only issue is that I didn't want them to end up together because they were 1st cousins. I suppose it was more socially acceptable back then. Fanny was starting to have some admiration of Mr. Crawford, and things were looking hopeful for Edmund and Mary Crawford. It could have all turned out so well, but it just wasn't meant to be.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2001

    Amazing, and totally profound

    I first read Pride and Prejudice, and found myself falling in love with Jane Austen's novels. Then I read Mansfield Park. Some people say that Fanny is dull and boring. Some even say that no person can have the same personality, but I found myself loving her for she is like me, and I disagree with any person who doesn't like her. She is so simple, but so profound! And the plot, well, it's just exceptionable! The novel was great, and I'm also very pleased with the new movie version of Mansfield Park, who's actors and actresses couldn't do a better job with one of Jane Austen's finest novels.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2000

    The best work by Austen

    I have read many works by Austen, and Mansfield Park is definetely the best, but sadly not her most popular work. Unlike Pride and Prejudice and its fairy tale story, Mansfield Park explores the deep emotions of human beings. From this book, Austen tries to show that anyone can be both good and bad, like Henry Crawford, whom I both hated and felt sympathy for. I don't understand why some say that the ending is bad, because without its surprising ending, Mansfield Park wouldn't be the profound novel that it is.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2013

    Poor quality

    If you absolutely MUST obtain a free copy, I suppose this one will suffice, but there are entire passages which are simply unreadable.

    :fTRSj&% dersiING wiwut fjsir , for instance... I would recommend another copy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    Electronic format unreadable!

    Do not get this copy. The book opens with a chapter from the middle of the story, sentences are incomplete, and many words are misspelled.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    2 separate volumes

    The free Mansfield Park books are actually in 2 separate volumes. Check the tiny print on the covers. There ARE a lot of typos because it was transcribed electronically, but you get used to it. This is not my favorite Austen book, but it's still Austen!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Poorly transcribed

    The words were so mangled it was nearly impossible to make out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    Roan

    What.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2012

    Leah

    O ok....cool.........is ur nook cting up? Mine wont post.......i gtg.....its pointless to stay bc i cant post and im super tired ;(

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2012

    L.e.a.h.

    O ok...cool! I gtg bc my nook wont post ;( night....sorry for having u come on

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2012

    Rope

    To climb

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2012

    Test

    Review

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2012

    JAFanatic

    I love anything Jane Austen.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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