A Manual Of Introduction To The New Testament

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
10 Doctrinal Views Of The Epistle". view can the peculiar teaching of onr Epistle be adequately explained.1 The fundamental thought of the Epistle is the founding of the New Covenant, which is destined finally to realize the ...
See more details below
Paperback
$28.50
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$35.75 List Price
A manual of introduction to the New Testament

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1889 volume)
FREE
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
10 Doctrinal Views Of The Epistle". view can the peculiar teaching of onr Epistle be adequately explained.1 The fundamental thought of the Epistle is the founding of the New Covenant, which is destined finally to realize the fulfilment of the Old Covenant promise that was not possible under the Old Covenant; a thought scarcely touched upon in any of the Pauline Epistlea. Hence the object of the attainment of salvation is discussed with exclusive reference to the nation of Israel, not because the author has any wish to shut the Gentiles out from it, but because he is solely concerned with the question as to how tbe original recipients of the promise should attain to its fulfilment. This would in truth have been impossible to the Gentile Apostle. The fact that salvation could not be attained under the Old Covenant, did not, as with Paul, lie in the carnal nature of man, but in the fleshly character of the law. The thought is not here fixed on the law as a divinely given ordinance of life, as with Paul, but on the legal expiatory institution, which could only atone for sins of infirmity; whereas Paul never contemplated this side of the law or this distinction of sins. Cut if the law is not designed to briug about the attainment of salvation, it is intended to prepare the way for it, though not, as with Paul, by awakening the consciousness of sin and exciting a desire for the attainment of salvation, but by the typical prefiguration of the perfect atonement promised for the Messianic time ; a thought that was first taken up by Paul in the Captivity Epistles and manifestly adopted from the primitive apostolic sphere of thought. For the purpose of establishing this, the ulJs already foretold in the Old Testament, now appears upon the earth, which name here denotes a being eternall...
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781115765787
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 10/3/2009
  • Pages: 438
  • Product dimensions: 9.69 (w) x 7.44 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Read an Excerpt


10 Doctrinal Views Of The Epistle". view can the peculiar teaching of onr Epistle be adequately explained.1 The fundamental thought of the Epistle is the founding of the New Covenant, which is destined finally to realize the fulfilment of the Old Covenant promise that was not possible under the Old Covenant; a thought scarcely touched upon in any of the Pauline Epistlea. Hence the object of the attainment of salvation is discussed with exclusive reference to the nation of Israel, not because the author has any wish to shut the Gentiles out from it, but because he is solely concerned with the question as to how tbe original recipients of the promise should attain to its fulfilment. This would in truth have been impossible to the Gentile Apostle. The fact that salvation could not be attained under the Old Covenant, did not, as with Paul, lie in the carnal nature of man, but in the fleshly character of the law. The thought is not here fixed on the law as a divinely given ordinance of life, as with Paul, but on the legal expiatory institution, which could only atone for sins of infirmity; whereas Paul never contemplated this side of the law or this distinction of sins. Cut if the law is not designed to briug about the attainment of salvation, it is intended to prepare the way for it, though not, as with Paul, by awakening the consciousness of sin and exciting a desire for the attainment of salvation, but by the typical prefiguration of the perfect atonement promised for the Messianic time ; a thought that was first taken up by Paul in the Captivity Epistles and manifestly adopted from the primitive apostolic sphere of thought. For the purpose of establishing this, the ulJs alreadyforetold in the Old Testament, now appears upon the earth, which name here denotes a being eternall...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)