A Manual of Photography: Founded on Hardwich's Photographic Chemistry (Classic Reprint)

A Manual of Photography: Founded on Hardwich's Photographic Chemistry (Classic Reprint)

by George Dawson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Excerpt from A Manual of Photography: Founded on Hardwich's Photographic Chemistry

The Art of Photography, which has now attained such perfection, and has become so popular amongst all classes, is one of comparatively recent introduction.

The word Photography means literally "writing by means of Light;" and it includes all processes by which any kind of

Overview

Excerpt from A Manual of Photography: Founded on Hardwich's Photographic Chemistry

The Art of Photography, which has now attained such perfection, and has become so popular amongst all classes, is one of comparatively recent introduction.

The word Photography means literally "writing by means of Light;" and it includes all processes by which any kind of picture can be obtained by the chemical agency of Light, without reference to the nature of the sensitive surface upon which it acts.

The philosophers of antiquity, although chemical changes due to the influence of Light were continually passing before their eyes, do not appear to have directed their attention to them. Some of the Alchemists indeed noticed the fact that a substance termed by them "Horn Silver," which was Chloride of Silver which had undergone fusion became blackened by exposure to Light; but their ideas on such substance termed by them "Horn Silver," which was Chloride of Silver which had undergone fusion, became blackened by exposure to Light; but their ideas on such subjects beings of the most erroneous nature, nothing resulted from the discovery.

The first philosophical examination of the decomposing action of Light upon compounds containing Silver was made by the illustrious Swedish chemist, Scheele, in the year 1777. It was remarked by him that the maximum chemical or decomposing effect of the spectrum lay near the violet part and gradually diminished towards the red. He also attributed the blackening of Chloride of Silver by light to the liberation of Chlorine and the formation of Hydrochloric acid. Both of these statements have been proved to be true.

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781330707715
Publisher:
FB &c Ltd
Publication date:
07/04/2015
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.65(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >