The Many Facets of Leadership

Overview

In The Many Facets of Leadership, more than 40 top leadership experts share their insights on every aspect of leadership in the 21st century. This book brings together new ideas and techniques for leading change, promoting learning and innovation, handling complexity and crisis, overcoming blind spots, managing knowledge workers, coaching tomorrow's leaders, increasing value, retaining customers, and much more.

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The Many Facets of Leadership

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Overview

In The Many Facets of Leadership, more than 40 top leadership experts share their insights on every aspect of leadership in the 21st century. This book brings together new ideas and techniques for leading change, promoting learning and innovation, handling complexity and crisis, overcoming blind spots, managing knowledge workers, coaching tomorrow's leaders, increasing value, retaining customers, and much more.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Soundview Executive Book Summaries
The Many Facets of Leadership features new essays on leading change, dealing with complexity and ambiguity, building learning organizations and promoting innovation from a broad cross-section of the world's most respected business thinkers and consultants. Each author offers a new approach to coaching and encouraging the next generation of dynamic leaders. Copyright (c) 2003 Soundview Executive Book Summaries
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131005334
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2002
  • Series: Financial Times Series
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

MARSHALL GOLDSMITH is one of the world's foremost authorities in helping leaders achieve a positive, measurable change in behavior for themselves, their people, and their teams. His work has been positively recognized by The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and The New Yorker. With Frances Hesselbein and Dick Beckhard, he edited The Leader of the Future (a BusinessWeek bestseller), The Organization of the Future, and The Community of the Future. Five of his recent books have been ranked #1 in their field by amazon.com.

VIJAY GOVINDARAJAN is the Earl C. Daum 1924 Professor of International Business and director of the William F. Achtmeyer Center for Global Leadership at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He has extensively published in top-tier academic journals in the areas of strategy and organization. He has received numerous scholarly awards, including the Glueck Best Research Paper Award in Business Policy and Strategy from the Academy of Management. He consults with CEOs and senior executives in a variety of global corporations. He has been rated by BusinessWeek as a Top Ten Professor in Corporate Executive Education. He has been a keynote speaker in major conferences including the BusinessWeek CEO Forum and the Economist Conferences.

BEVERLY KAYE, co-author of the international bestseller Love 'Em or Lose 'Em: Getting Good People to Stay and author of the classic Up Is Not The Only Way, is one of the nation's leading authorities on career development, mentoring, retention, and engagement. She is founder and president of Career Systems International, Scranton, PA. As a sought-after speaker and consultant on talent management issues, Dr. Kaye counts some of the nation's leading corporations as her clients. She is an active member of the American Society for Training & Development and she has received their National Career Development Award and Best Practice Award for her work.

ALBERT A. VICERE is Executive Education Professor of Strategic Leadership at Penn State's Smeal College of Business and President of Vicere Associates Inc., a consulting firm whose clients span the globe. He is a recipient of the Smeal College's MBA Excellence in Teaching Award, the Institute for Management Studies' Distinguished Faculty Award, and two Literati Clubs Awards for Excellence in writing and research. He is the author of several books and more than 70 articles focused on leadership development and organizational effectiveness.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

No book of collected works happens overnight. This one took a good two years of labor and then some. Perhaps the best way to provide you with an overview of its contents is to tell you a bit about its name. The subject of leadership is clearly multifaceted. The depth and breadth of the subject itself allows thought leaders everywhere to rethink it through their own lens. It is by adding a unique lens that the old becomes new—or at least worth exploring in new ways. In each chapter of this book you will see the distinct lens of its author, as each presents the cutting edge of his or her own subject matter.

For most of the authors of this book, this was not a two-year project. Rather, it was the distillation of their thinking over a much more extended period of time. In some instances, the thinking shaped itself throughout their professional careers. The authors come from varied backgrounds. Some are academicians and have spent the bulk of their careers in business schools, colleges, or universities. Others have had long consulting careers and now direct their own firms. Still others gained their experience in private or public sector organizations. And many have done all three.

Diverse as they are, they have several things in common. All have served as IMS faculty, and many still do. All have been leaders in organizations in one way or another. All believe that the education of managers in organizations is critical and that learning to be a good leader is a lifelong process.

Here's what you'll find.

Part I, "Forging Ahead: The Quest for Knowledge," suggests that the quest for learning and knowledge is key to great leadership and provides avariety of perspectives. Tony Buzan looks at learning in the context of improving techniques for management, and employs his Mind Mapping technique in "Intelligence on Intelligence and the Development of Intellectual Capital." Paul J. H. Schoemaker discusses a useful way to understand the barriers to internal change in "Organizational Renewal: Overcoming Mental Blind Spots." In "The Creativity and Commitment Connection" Amarjit Chopra focuses on the ability to create buy-in for new ideas and how to motivate people to implement better ways of interacting.

William Ury shows us that eight out of ten decisions are not self-made—they are negotiated. He believes that "networks of negotiation" are taking their place in "The Negotiation Revolution." John J. Scherer suggests that chaos plays a vital role in birthing fundamental change and innovation in "The Role of Chaos in the Creation of Change." Russell L. Ackoff, in "Fundamentalism and Panaceas," describes his concept of how leaders look for simple solutions to serious problems.

Part II, "Facilitating Change: The Leader's Role" provides insights to the vital role of the leader. In "Leadership in the Networked Economy" Albert A. Vicere describes four key roles necessary for effective leadership. In "The Organizational Change Leader" W. Warner Burke provides a phased system of viewing organizational change and the role of leadership within each phase. Joel R. DeLuca proposes a working model for development of successful leaders in "Entrepreneurial Leadership: Building Capacity for Speed, Risk, and Continuous Innovation."

In "Leadership: Reflections and Learnings" Robert Terry shares a series of learning's that have challenged his own understanding and practice of leadership. Michael M. Lombardo and Robert W. Eichinger describe four kinds of experiences related to learned skills in the workplace in "Experience is Still the Best Teacher." In "Polarity Management: One Tool for Managing Complexity and Ambiguity" Barry Johnson illustrates the way in which leaders deal with dilemmas. Peter Koestenbaum consolidates insights about the structure of human existence in "Facing the Paradoxes of Leadership: Eight Rules." Charles E. Dwyer summarizes the essential elements in a successful approach to human influence in "Human Influence."

Part III, "Making the Grade: New Leadership Skills," suggests several critical leadership qualities that are essential for leaders. In "Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go" Beverly L. Kaye provides a series of practical tips to leaders for effective (and non-time-consuming) career coaching. Randall P. White and Phillip Hodgson, in "The Newest Leadership Skills," offer interesting insights on leadership styles of the past and the changes in new leadership styles. In "When Good People Do Bad Things" Ronald M. Green analyzes the causes of the Ford Explorer/Firestone tire disaster to understand why business managers sometimes make ethically poor decisions. Marshall Goldsmith talks about how to be coached and includes some helpful questions to ask when engaging in a coaching relationship in "Recruiting Supportive Coaches: A Key to Achieving Positive Behavioral Change."

In "Global Leadership and Global Emotional Intelligence" Stephen H. Rhinesmith correlates Daniel Goleman's ideas about emotional intelligence with global leadership. Larraine Segil offers her ten essential traits in "Is Your Organization Driven By Dynamic Leaders?" Idalene Kesner examines how organizations should prepare for potential future crises and provides helpful tools for examining current preparedness in "Effective Crisis Management: Now More Than Ever."

Part IV, "Creating Competitive Advantage: Strategies for Success," provides an array of useful strategies. Fons Trompenaars and Peter Woolliams present a methodology for developing marketing strategies based on cultural differences in "Marketing Through Reconciliation: Global Brand, Local Touch." In their article "The Effective Use of Scenario Analysis to Support Research and Development" Peter Schwartz and Gerald Harris identify six best practices useful to companies applying scenario analysis to R&D planning.

James M. Hulbert and Pierre Berthon address the movement away from a material to an information economy and its impact on marketing in their article "Morphing Marketing: Dissolving Decisions." Chip R. Bell provides a framework to understand the customer relationship process as circular in his article, "Creating Obnoxiously Devoted Customers." In "The Strategy of Bundling" Barry Nalebuff provides understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this strategy with examples of when it works and when it doesn't.

Finally, Part V, "Taking the Lead: Organizations of the New Millennium," speaks to the rapidly changing business environment and the need for flexibility, speed, and strategic agility. In "Anatomy of an Innovation Machine: Cisco Systems" Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble provide a natural progression of the innovation process utilizing their four-step process and organizational design. In "Achieving Best Fit" Judith M. Bardwick describes borderless and stable organizations and how they attract and appeal to different individuals in the job market today. Maurice Saias and Olivier Tabatoni describe their definition of strategy in today's environment and outline the discontinuities corporations face in "Strategy for the 21st Century: Portfolio Is Back."

Homa Bahrami and Stuart Evans, in "Organizing for Strategic Flexibility," define three core dimensions that are utilized in the architecture of a flexible enterprise. David Lei introduces value confederations and the way in which these groups of firms will reshape industry in "Competitive Dynamics, Strategy, and Competence Development: The Rise of Value Confederations in Fast-Change Industries." Thomas Monahan and Stephen A. Stumpf, in "New Measures of Prosperity," suggest a means to value and to measure an organization and its employees' performance beyond the standard financial measurements currently in place. Charles Handy discusses the different types of leadership needed within organizations during different stages of the organization's lifecycle in "A World of Fleas and Elephants."

We hope you will use this collection of articles as a guide. Turn to the subject you need when you need it. Scan the material, ponder the suggestions, talk it over with peers, and test these ideas in your own organization. Let these thought leaders mentor you.

Marshall Goldsmith
Vijay Govindarajan
Beverly Kaye
Albert A. Vicere

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Table of Contents

Foreword XXI
Introduction XXV
Part I Forging Ahead: The Quest for Knowledge
Chapter 1 Intelligence on Intelligence and the Development of Intellectual Capital 3
Chapter 2 Organizational Renewal: Overcoming Mental Blind Spots 17
Chapter 3 The Creativity and Commitment Connection 31
Chapter 4 The Negotiation Revolution 43
Chapter 5 The Role of Chaos in the Creation of Change 51
Chapter 6 Fundamentalism and Panaceas 59
Part II Facilitating Change: the Leader's Role
Chapter 7 Leadership in the Networked Economy 71
Chapter 8 The Organizational Change Leader 83
Chapter 9 Entrepreneurial Leadership: Building Capacity for Speed, Risk, and Continuous Innovation 99
Chapter 10 Leadership: Reflections and Learnings 115
Chapter 11 Experience Is Still the Best Teacher 129
Chapter 12 Polarity Management: One Tool for Managing Complexity and Ambiguity 139
Chapter 13 Facing the Paradoxes of Leadership: Eight Rules 151
Chapter 14 Human Influence 157
Part III Making the Grade: New Leadership Skills
Chapter 15 Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go: A Development Edge Gives Retention Results 169
Chapter 16 The Newest Leadership Skills 181
Chapter 17 When Good People Do Bad Things: The Anatomy of a Corporate Disaster 189
Chapter 18 Recruiting Supportive Coaches: A Key to Achieving Positive Behavioral Change 209
Chapter 19 Global Leadership and Global Emotional Intelligence 215
Chapter 20 Is Your Organization Driven by Dynamic Leaders? 229
Chapter 21 Effective Crisis Management: Now More Than Ever 241
Part IV Creating Competitive Advantage: Strategies for Success
Chapter 22 Marketing Through Reconciliation: Global Brand, Local Touch 253
Chapter 23 The Effective Use of Scenario Analysis to Support Research and Development 263
Chapter 24 Morphing Marketing: Dissolving Decisions 271
Chapter 25 Creating Obnoxiously Devoted Customers 283
Chapter 26 The Strategy of Bundling 293
Part V Taking the Lead: Organizations of the New Millennium
Chapter 27 Anatomy of an Innovation Machine: Cisco Systems 305
Chapter 28 Achieving Best Fit 327
Chapter 29 Strategy for the 21st Century: Portfolio is Back 335
Chapter 30 Organizing for Strategic Flexibility 351
Chapter 31 Competitive Dynamics, Strategy, and Competence Development: The Rise of Value Confederations in Fast-Change Industries 361
Chapter 32 New Measures of Prosperity 379
Chapter 33 A World of Fleas and Elephants 393
Index 401
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Preface

Introduction

No book of collected works happens overnight. This one took a good two years of labor and then some. Perhaps the best way to provide you with an overview of its contents is to tell you a bit about its name. The subject of leadership is clearly multifaceted. The depth and breadth of the subject itself allows thought leaders everywhere to rethink it through their own lens. It is by adding a unique lens that the old becomes new--or at least worth exploring in new ways. In each chapter of this book you will see the distinct lens of its author, as each presents the cutting edge of his or her own subject matter.

For most of the authors of this book, this was not a two-year project. Rather, it was the distillation of their thinking over a much more extended period of time. In some instances, the thinking shaped itself throughout their professional careers. The authors come from varied backgrounds. Some are academicians and have spent the bulk of their careers in business schools, colleges, or universities. Others have had long consulting careers and now direct their own firms. Still others gained their experience in private or public sector organizations. And many have done all three.

Diverse as they are, they have several things in common. All have served as IMS faculty, and many still do. All have been leaders in organizations in one way or another. All believe that the education of managers in organizations is critical and that learning to be a good leader is a lifelong process.

Here's what you'll find.

Part I, "Forging Ahead: The Quest for Knowledge," suggests that the quest for learning and knowledge is key to great leadership and provides a variety of perspectives. Tony Buzan looks at learning in the context of improving techniques for management, and employs his Mind Mapping technique in "Intelligence on Intelligence and the Development of Intellectual Capital." Paul J. H. Schoemaker discusses a useful way to understand the barriers to internal change in "Organizational Renewal: Overcoming Mental Blind Spots." In "The Creativity and Commitment Connection" Amarjit Chopra focuses on the ability to create buy-in for new ideas and how to motivate people to implement better ways of interacting.

William Ury shows us that eight out of ten decisions are not self-made--they are negotiated. He believes that "networks of negotiation" are taking their place in "The Negotiation Revolution." John J. Scherer suggests that chaos plays a vital role in birthing fundamental change and innovation in "The Role of Chaos in the Creation of Change." Russell L. Ackoff, in "Fundamentalism and Panaceas," describes his concept of how leaders look for simple solutions to serious problems.

Part II, "Facilitating Change: The Leader's Role" provides insights to the vital role of the leader. In "Leadership in the Networked Economy" Albert A. Vicere describes four key roles necessary for effective leadership. In "The Organizational Change Leader" W. Warner Burke provides a phased system of viewing organizational change and the role of leadership within each phase. Joel R. DeLuca proposes a working model for development of successful leaders in "Entrepreneurial Leadership: Building Capacity for Speed, Risk, and Continuous Innovation."

In "Leadership: Reflections and Learnings" Robert Terry shares a series of learning's that have challenged his own understanding and practice of leadership. Michael M. Lombardo and Robert W. Eichinger describe four kinds of experiences related to learned skills in the workplace in "Experience is Still the Best Teacher." In "Polarity Management: One Tool for Managing Complexity and Ambiguity" Barry Johnson illustrates the way in which leaders deal with dilemmas. Peter Koestenbaum consolidates insights about the structure of human existence in "Facing the Paradoxes of Leadership: Eight Rules." Charles E. Dwyer summarizes the essential elements in a successful approach to human influence in "Human Influence."

Part III, "Making the Grade: New Leadership Skills," suggests several critical leadership qualities that are essential for leaders. In "Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go" Beverly L. Kaye provides a series of practical tips to leaders for effective (and non-time-consuming) career coaching. Randall P. White and Phillip Hodgson, in "The Newest Leadership Skills," offer interesting insights on leadership styles of the past and the changes in new leadership styles. In "When Good People Do Bad Things" Ronald M. Green analyzes the causes of the Ford Explorer/Firestone tire disaster to understand why business managers sometimes make ethically poor decisions. Marshall Goldsmith talks about how to be coached and includes some helpful questions to ask when engaging in a coaching relationship in "Recruiting Supportive Coaches: A Key to Achieving Positive Behavioral Change."

In "Global Leadership and Global Emotional Intelligence" Stephen H. Rhinesmith correlates Daniel Goleman's ideas about emotional intelligence with global leadership. Larraine Segil offers her ten essential traits in "Is Your Organization Driven By Dynamic Leaders?" Idalene Kesner examines how organizations should prepare for potential future crises and provides helpful tools for examining current preparedness in "Effective Crisis Management: Now More Than Ever."

Part IV, "Creating Competitive Advantage: Strategies for Success," provides an array of useful strategies. Fons Trompenaars and Peter Woolliams present a methodology for developing marketing strategies based on cultural differences in "Marketing Through Reconciliation: Global Brand, Local Touch." In their article "The Effective Use of Scenario Analysis to Support Research and Development" Peter Schwartz and Gerald Harris identify six best practices useful to companies applying scenario analysis to R&D planning.

James M. Hulbert and Pierre Berthon address the movement away from a material to an information economy and its impact on marketing in their article "Morphing Marketing: Dissolving Decisions." Chip R. Bell provides a framework to understand the customer relationship process as circular in his article, "Creating Obnoxiously Devoted Customers." In "The Strategy of Bundling" Barry Nalebuff provides understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this strategy with examples of when it works and when it doesn't.

Finally, Part V, "Taking the Lead: Organizations of the New Millennium," speaks to the rapidly changing business environment and the need for flexibility, speed, and strategic agility. In "Anatomy of an Innovation Machine: Cisco Systems" Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble provide a natural progression of the innovation process utilizing their four-step process and organizational design. In "Achieving Best Fit" Judith M. Bardwick describes borderless and stable organizations and how they attract and appeal to different individuals in the job market today. Maurice Saias and Olivier Tabatoni describe their definition of strategy in today's environment and outline the discontinuities corporations face in "Strategy for the 21st Century: Portfolio Is Back."

Homa Bahrami and Stuart Evans, in "Organizing for Strategic Flexibility," define three core dimensions that are utilized in the architecture of a flexible enterprise. David Lei introduces value confederations and the way in which these groups of firms will reshape industry in "Competitive Dynamics, Strategy, and Competence Development: The Rise of Value Confederations in Fast-Change Industries." Thomas Monahan and Stephen A. Stumpf, in "New Measures of Prosperity," suggest a means to value and to measure an organization and its employees' performance beyond the standard financial measurements currently in place. Charles Handy discusses the different types of leadership needed within organizations during different stages of the organization's lifecycle in "A World of Fleas and Elephants."

We hope you will use this collection of articles as a guide. Turn to the subject you need when you need it. Scan the material, ponder the suggestions, talk it over with peers, and test these ideas in your own organization. Let these thought leaders mentor you.

Marshall Goldsmith Vijay Govindarajan Beverly Kaye Albert A. Vicere

Read More Show Less

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