Many Rivers to Cross

Many Rivers to Cross

by M. R. Montgomery
     
 

M.R. Montgomery journeys from the headwaters of the Columbia River and Hoodoo Creek in the interior of the Crow Reservation, to eastern Oregon and to Rosebud Creek, where General Custer's reinforcements camped and went fishing instead of joining the battle at Little Bighorn. Along the way, he makes stops at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, and traces the… See more details below

Overview

M.R. Montgomery journeys from the headwaters of the Columbia River and Hoodoo Creek in the interior of the Crow Reservation, to eastern Oregon and to Rosebud Creek, where General Custer's reinforcements camped and went fishing instead of joining the battle at Little Bighorn. Along the way, he makes stops at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, and traces the steps of Lewis and Clark (each of whom had a species of trout - Salmo lewisi and Salmo clarki - named after him during the nineteenth century); visiting landscapes in danger of vanishing under the tracks of tourists, land developers, and even grazing cows. Montgomery guides us through overlooked locations in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona, and Oregon - all of the last best places - narrating his travels with luminous descriptions of territory, peculiarly Western characters, and uncommon history. All of this is sharply observed with dry humor, as in his explanation of why it is handiest to be in Utah when one is having problems away from home, or in describing the inherent hilarity of mud volcanos. And there is, of course, the ever-present quest for trout, from the Bonneville cutthroat to the rare Apache trout, all of which are ever harder to find in their natural state. Like the landscape, native trout are disappearing, overwhelmed by introduced stock.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
To the author, the sight of a young woman swimming nude in a river was depressing; water warm enough for skinny-dipping was not good trout water. A writer for the Boston Globe and avid fly fisherman, Montgomery traveled to the West seeking pristine streams and native cutthroat trout. His journeys took him from Arizona to Montana, up the Missouri, down the Columbia, across the Colorado and the Rio Grande, into the Great Basin. He fished Rosebud Creek, near the Little Bighorn; he followed the trail of Lewis and Clark, observing that they had ignored fish in their reports. Montgomery found the last best place in the Oregon desert-a brooklet one foot wide and less than that deep, where he caught the rare trout. This engaging narrative is not just for those who fish but any reader interested in wilderness. Illustrations. (Mar.)
Jon Kartman
This splendid book is more about the search for the lost West than fishing for trout. Montgomery decided to roam the West's expanses looking for areas that have been untouched, or at least not much touched, by humankind and catching what fish he could. Not surprisingly, he didn't find many such areas--a small river here, a little creek there, even a ditch in the desert with just enough water to support a few trout. Along the literary retracing of his way, he tells tales of the Old West, discusses the strange and unusual people he met, and notes the near perpetual presence of cattle, munching and trampling their way across the countryside. In fact, he gets pretty angry at these Big Macs on the hoof for their destruction of free-flowing streams and the habitats they support. As for fishing, Montgomery pursued the cutthroat trout, which, though looked down on by "pure" fly fishers, is the native western trout (the rainbows and browns are foreigners introduced long ago to "improve" the fishery).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671792862
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
03/09/1995
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.77(w) x 8.71(h) x 0.92(d)

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