Mao's Last Revolution / Edition 1

Mao's Last Revolution / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Roderick MacFarquhar, Michael Schoenhals
     
 

ISBN-10: 0674023323

ISBN-13: 9780674023321

Pub. Date: 08/28/2006

Publisher: Harvard University Press

In a masterly book, Roderick MacFarquhar and Michael Schoenhals explain why Mao launched the Cultural Revolution, and show his Machiavellian role in masterminding it (which Chinese publications conceal). In often horrifying detail, they document the Hobbesian state that ensued. The movement veered out of control, and terror paralyzed the country. Power struggles raged…  See more details below

Overview

In a masterly book, Roderick MacFarquhar and Michael Schoenhals explain why Mao launched the Cultural Revolution, and show his Machiavellian role in masterminding it (which Chinese publications conceal). In often horrifying detail, they document the Hobbesian state that ensued. The movement veered out of control, and terror paralyzed the country. Power struggles raged among Lin Biao, Zhou Enlai, Deng Xiaoping, and Jiang Qing-Mao's wife and leader of the Gang of Four-while Mao often played one against the other.

About the Author:
Roderick Macfarquhar is Leroy B. Williams Professor of History and Political Science, and Professor of Government, Harvard University

About the Author:
Michael Schoenhals is Professor in Modern Chinese Society at Lund University, Sweden

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674023321
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
08/28/2006
Pages:
752

Table of Contents

Preface     ix
Abbreviations     xiii
Introduction     1
The First Salvos     14
The Siege of Beijing     32
Confusion on Campuses     52
The Fifty Days     66
Mao's New Successor     86
The Red Guards     102
Red Terror     117
Confusion Nationwide     132
Shanghai's "January Storm"     155
Seizing Power     170
The Last Stand of the Old Guard     184
The Wuhan Incident     199
The May 16 Conspiracy     221
The End of the Red Guards     239
Cleansing the Class Ranks     253
Dispatching Liu Shaoqi     273
The Congress of Victors     285
War Scares     308
The Defection and Death of Lin Biao     324
Mao Becalmed     337
Zhou under Pressure     358
Deng Xiaoping Takes Over     379
The Gang of Four Emerges     396
The Tiananmen Incident of 1976     413
The Last Days of Chairman Mao     431
Conclusion     450
Glossary of Names and Identities     465
A Note on Sources     479
Notes     483
Bibliography     611
Illustration Credits     659
Index     661

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Mao's Last Revolution 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, by two distinguished scholars of modern Chinese politics, is a comprehensive history of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, an event initiated by the 'Great Helmsman', Chairman Mao Zedong. It ran for about a decade, spanning the years 1966-1976. The book features an introductory chapter which very succinctly outlines the motive for the upheaval, but the remainder of the book is an exhaustive catalogue of the defining events. Each and every political figure of even the most tangential importance to the Cultural Revolution is given abundant ink. While this is of great importance to serious students of modern China, the wealth of detail is daunting for the general reader searching for an explanatory but non-superficial history. The arcana of Chinese Communist Party internecine warfare are catalogued in excruciating detail, replete with all the bloated slogans and cant typical of that era in modern Marxism. The vast damage to the Chinese economy, the armed forces, the educational system and the Chinese social structure is highlighted. The dubious role played by Zho Enlai is also discussed in detail, as is the tumultuous career in CCP politics of Deng Xiaoping. The unplanned ascendency of the Peoples Liberation Army as a result of GCR policies eventually required the removal of Mao's planned successor, Lin Biao and his supporters in the PLA general's ranks. The authors note that, along with the tumult engendered by Mao's 'Great Leap Forward', the GCR was equally cataclysmic for China. Presumably, as a result of these two upheavals, the stage was set for a more pragmatic form of statecraft by Deng and his successors. Finally, the authors note that, along with Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin, Mao will be remembered as one of the great tyrants and murderers of the 20th Century. In summary, this is a highly detailed work which is not for the casual reader.