March to Fuzz

March to Fuzz

by Mudhoney
     
 

Although it was Nirvana that spread the smell of teen spirit far and wide across the land, making "grunge" an MTV buzzword and flannel an early '90s fashion statement, Mudhoney in the late '80s was perfecting its own recipe for Seattle sludge. Combining a cup of garage punk, a pinch of metal, a tablespoon of psychedelia, and a smidgen of surf…  See more details below

Overview

Although it was Nirvana that spread the smell of teen spirit far and wide across the land, making "grunge" an MTV buzzword and flannel an early '90s fashion statement, Mudhoney in the late '80s was perfecting its own recipe for Seattle sludge. Combining a cup of garage punk, a pinch of metal, a tablespoon of psychedelia, and a smidgen of surf rock, and then glazing the whole concoction with layers of fuzzy guitar distortion, Mudhoney developed alongside Nirvana as a harder-edged, more garagey sounding sibling. The double disc MARCH TO FUZZ chronicles Mudhoney's development from the early, rambunctious material of 1989's SUPERFUZZ BIGMUFF to the trancier (but still rowdy) fare of 1998's TOMORROW HIT TODAY. The first disc features such underground classics as the dizzying "Touch Me I'm Sick," the blistering "Suck You Dry," and the insidious "Sweet Young Thing Ain't Sweet No More." Even if you've already got all these goodies in your record collection, they sound great sandwiched together. And if that's not enough, the second disc of 28 rarities and B-sides should enthrall even the most seasoned Mudhoney fan. Here's where the band really lets down its muddied locks to toy with Ventures-style dynamics on "You Stupid Asshole" and "March to Fuzz," to deconstruct the blues on "Fuzzbuster," to cover a broad swath of artists including Elvis Costello, Void, Suicide, the Damned, and Spacemen 3, and to bash out more messy handfuls of grungelicious originals. Feast on the fuzz.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Steve Huey
Mudhoney was most convincing when the 7" recording format limited their more indulgent tendencies. In general (especially early on), their albums were always peppered with great songs -- usually variations on the band's trademark scuzzy sound and sneering attitude -- but rarely sustained momentum all the way through, thanks in part to the band's weakness for ponderous jams. The sorely needed, two-disc best-of March to Fuzz attempts to have it both ways: the first disc is a generous, 22-track overview of their recordings from 1988-1998, while the second compiles 30 rarities for the devotees. It's a tactic that's been used before, and it's usually maddening, giving both casual and die-hard fans an entire disc they don't want. But March to Fuzz actually works very well. For one, it's not priced as a double-disc set, and for another, both discs are actually very strong. Mudhoney's sound didn't change very much over the course of their career, which means that even though disc one isn't arranged chronologically, everything is pretty much of a piece. It's also very well chosen, even if the surprisingly strong latter-day albums My Brother the Cow and Tomorrow Hit Today aren't heavily represented. But the disc makes a convincing case that Mudhoney never stopped making bruising, vital rock & roll, or writing great (albeit samey) songs. The rarities disc is surprisingly entertaining, featuring plenty of cover versions, cranky goofs, and songs that were certainly better than some of their album tracks, but were relegated to B-sides or indie compilations. Their '60s garage and surf roots are actually summed up very effectively here, as well as their love of early-'80s hardcore. March to Fuzz might be a little hard to handle all in one sitting, but it's hard to imagine a better overview of Mudhoney's career.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/18/2000
Label:
Sub Pop
UPC:
0098787050028
catalogNumber:
500
Rank:
58313

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. In 'n' out of Grace
  2. Suck You Dry
  3. I Have to Laugh
  4. Sweet Young Thing Ain't Sweet No More
  5. Who You Drivin' Now
  6. You Got It
  7. Judgement, Rage, Retribution and Thyme
  8. Into the Drink
  9. A Thousand Forms of Mind
  10. Generation Genocide
  11. If I Think
  12. Here Comes Sickness
  13. Let It Slide
  14. Touch Me I'm Sick
  15. This Gift
  16. Good Enough
  17. Blinding Sun
  18. Into Your Shtik
  19. Beneath the Valley of the Underdog
  20. When Tomorrow Hits
  21. Make It Now Again
  22. Hate the Police

Disc 2

  1. Hey Sailor
  2. Twenty Four
  3. Baby Help Me Forget
  4. Revolution
  5. You Stupid Asshole
  6. Who Is Who
  7. Stab Your Back
  8. Pump It Up
  9. The Money Will Roll Right In
  10. Fix Me
  11. Dehumanized
  12. She's Just 15
  13. Baby O Baby
  14. Over the Top
  15. You Give Me the Creeps
  16. March to Fuzz
  17. Ounce of Deception
  18. Paperback Life
  19. Bushpusher Man
  20. Fuzzbeater
  21. Overblown
  22. Run Shithead Run
  23. King Sandbox
  24. Tonight I Think I'm Gonna Go Downtown
  25. Holden
  26. Not Going Down That Road Again
  27. Brand New Face
  28. Drinking for Two
  29. Butterfly Stroke
  30. Editions of You

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Mudhoney   Primary Artist

Technical Credits

Jimmie Dale Gilmore   Composer
Bryan Ferry   Composer
Mudhoney   Producer
Jack Endino   Producer,Engineer
Greg Ginn   Composer
Mark Arm   Composer,Sleeve Notes
Kurt Bloch   Producer,Engineer
"Fast" Eddie Clarke   Composer
James Luther Dickinson   Producer
Adam Kasper   Engineer
Lemmy   Composer
Matt Lukin   Composer,Sleeve Notes
Dan Peters   Composer,Sleeve Notes
John Reed   Composer
Phil "Philthy Animal" Taylor   Composer
Steve Turner   Composer,Liner Notes
Conrad Uno   Producer,Engineer

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