Marching Home

Marching Home

3.8 6
by Kevin Coyne
     
 
Of the sixteen million Americans who served in the armed forces during World War II, not quite a thousand were from Freehold, New Jersey—a bustling courthouse town home to a diverse populace that reflected the varied faces and aspirations of the nation. Award-winning author Kevin Coyne's chronicle follows six young men from Freehold through the war and back home

Overview

Of the sixteen million Americans who served in the armed forces during World War II, not quite a thousand were from Freehold, New Jersey—a bustling courthouse town home to a diverse populace that reflected the varied faces and aspirations of the nation. Award-winning author Kevin Coyne's chronicle follows six young men from Freehold through the war and back home again—to a town and a nation on the brink of changes larger than any of them could have imagined. Their story is the story of millions of other veterans, thousands of other towns, and it is the great epic of the last century—the story of what America was then, in its hardest hours, and how it became what it is now.

Author Biography: Kevin Coyne is the author of Domers: A Year at Notre Dame and has contributed to many newspapers and magazines.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142003862
Publisher:
Viking Penguin
Publication date:
01/27/2004
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.42(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Kevin Coyne is the author of Domers: A Year at Notre Dame and has contributed to many newspapers and magazines.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Freehold, New Jersey
Date of Birth:
May 5, 1959
Place of Birth:
Freehold, New Jersey
Education:
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1981

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Marching Home 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You care about these guys and are afraid that the author might lose one of them. Fortunately, no! The stylistic problem is that the jumping back and forth between the soldiers which works so well for the first half just doesn't hold for the rest of the book. You've got to focus on/identify with at least one character to really care about actually reading any book...and the rug controversy, the hospital, even the horrible loss of the beautiful farmland just don't carry it without any revealing dialogue between people you get to know deeply. We need more from Buddy on Freehold, the U.S., the African American migrants (a confrontation with an inside source would help), and racism. Most of the book is well-balanced - with the singular exception of the jarring, jaw-dropping Hiroshima-was-Cool conclusion with no counterpoint of alternative solutions offered none. My father served in The Marianas - my Mom will love this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
although i liked the book very much because it accurately portrayed freehold with all of it's failings, i disagree with mr. coyne's policies when he was a member of the town council. i found it very disappointing that he of all people being the town historian would be a party to persecuting the undocumented workers and their families. that is the same thing that was done to the black citizens of freehold, including open segregation in schools, housing and public places such as theatres and restaurants just a short time ago.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book with a rare anticipation. I'm from the same home town written about here, and couldn't wait to read about the familiar places and names it contained. There was only one problem though. Mr. Coyne is such a terrible writer that he makes the book essentially unreadable. I've had it sitting on my nightstand for a year now and I still can't bring myself to get through. I will though! It's now become a personal quest to get through this pile of garbage.