Margaret Tobin ''Molly'' Brown: Titanic Survivor Pursued Social Reforms [NOOK Book]

Overview

Although Margaret "The Unsinkable Molly" Brown is well known for her heroic efforts in surviving the Titanic disaster, that historic event doesn't begin to reveal the full measure of who she was or what she accomplished during her fascinating life. And Margaret-the name "Molly" was a Hollywood invention-was the subject of as many myths as Aesop had fables. The real Margaret Brown is often obscured by her characterization in blockbusters such as "Titanic" and, of course, the Broadway musical. And then there's the ...
See more details below
Margaret Tobin ''Molly'' Brown: Titanic Survivor Pursued Social Reforms

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$1.99
BN.com price

Overview

Although Margaret "The Unsinkable Molly" Brown is well known for her heroic efforts in surviving the Titanic disaster, that historic event doesn't begin to reveal the full measure of who she was or what she accomplished during her fascinating life. And Margaret-the name "Molly" was a Hollywood invention-was the subject of as many myths as Aesop had fables. The real Margaret Brown is often obscured by her characterization in blockbusters such as "Titanic" and, of course, the Broadway musical. And then there's the movie, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown." There was much more to the woman who grew up dirt poor, fell into a fortune through her husband's hard work, and used her wealth for social causes and education. She was not attracted to Denver's "old money," preferring to use her time and money for the benefit of others. Author Daniel Alef's biographical profile of Margaret Brown is not hagiography, but one has to look long and hard for any deficiencies in her character or her life. [2,082-word Titans of Fortune article]
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781608042975
  • Publisher: Titans of Fortune Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2009
  • Series: Titans of Fortune
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 550,717
  • File size: 478 KB

Meet the Author

Daniel Alef has written many articles, one law book, one historical anthology, Centennial Stories, and authored the award-winning historical novel, Pale Truth (MaxIt Publishing, 2000). Foreword Magazine named Pale Truth book of the year for general fiction in 2001 and the novel received many outstanding reviews including ones from Publishers Weekly and the American Library Association's Booklist. A sequel to Pale Truth, currently entitled Measured Swords, has just been completed. Titans of Fortune, biographical profiles of America's great moguls, men and women who had a profound impact on America and the World, began in April 2003. He is also a contributor to the recently released reference work: Gender and Women's Leadership pubished by Sage Publishing. Mr. Alef's experience as a lawyer, CEO of a public company, a rancher, and author, combined with his academic background-UCLA (B.S.), UCLA Law School (J.D.), the London School of Economics and Political Science (LL.M.), and Cambridge University (post-graduate studies)-gave him the perception to analyze the powerful titans and their achievements, and to place their lives and triumphs in a larger perspective. The Titans of Fortune series of articles appeared in several newspapers including the Lee Newspapers, Knight-Ridder, and became a weekly column in the Santa Barbara News Press. Mr. Alef also had a one-hour weekly radio show based on the Titans of Fortune column. He has appeared as a guest speaker and lecturer at various university, Rotary, and Kiwanis clubs, public libraries including San Francisco and Chicago, cruise ships, and at numerous historical societies across the nation. Mr. Alef serves on the Board of Trustees of the Santa Barbara Historical Museum and on the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Activities League. He is a black belt in judo and one of the head instructors of the University of California at Santa Barbara Judo Club. He currently lives with his family in Santa Barbara.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Although Margaret "The Unsinkable Molly" Brown is well known for her heroic efforts in surviving the Titanic disaster, that historic event doesn't begin to reveal the full measure of who she was or what she accomplished during her fascinating life.
And Margaret-the name "Molly" was a Hollywood invention-was the subject of as many myths as Aesop had fables. The real Margaret Brown is often obscured by her characterization in blockbusters such as "Titanic" and, of course, the Broadway musical. And then there's the movie, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown," in which Debbie Reynolds portrayed "Molly" on the screen in 1964.
Margaret was born in 1867 in the "Irish Shanty Town" section of Hannibal, Mo., two months prematurely due to a "cyclone" that struck Hannibal, the earliest barometer of her remarkable resilience. Her father was a poor Irish immigrant who worked at the local gas works.
Molly was raised in a tiny, 480-square-foot house two blocks from the Hannibal gas works with her three brothers and sisters; at night the family's chickens and cow occupied the basement -- there was no money or place for a separate barn.
Molly attended a school run by her aunt until she was 13, then went to work in a tobacco factory stripping tobacco leaves 12 hours a day, six days a week. Working conditions were miserable, and this experience sparked a lifelong advocacy for workers and unions. Margaret subsequently went to work in Hannibal's Park Hotel.
One myth places Hannibal's most famous resident, Mark Twain, side-by-side with Margaret, but he left the city years before she was born. Still, she was enthralled by Twain and his writing, subsequently penning an article about him in a Denver newspaper and arranging a transcription of his works into Braille. She also attended the dedication of the Tom and Huck statue in Hannibal in 1926.
In 1883, Margaret's sister and her husband moved to Leadville, Colo., to work in the silver mines; Molly and her brother followed. Leadville was the greatest of all the Colorado mining regions with a population of 40,000 living at the highest altitude of any American city -- 10,000 feet. Like all mining towns, large or small, it was a rough place to live, populated mostly by men seeking their fortunes-even Doc Holliday, the notorious gunslinger moved there after the fight at the O. K. Corral. But the town was thriving when Margaret arrived: There were 14 smelters and reduction plants, producing $10 million of silver annually. She landed a job as a clerk in Daniel, Fisher and Smith's Emporium, a dry-goods store on Harrison Avenue.
In 1886 she met a 34-year-old mining engineer, James Joseph "J.J." Brown, at a church function.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2012

    An excellent synopsis of Brown. Well-written though short.

    An excellent synopsis of Brown. Well-written though short.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Quick but good bio

    Easy to read... enjoyed learning about Molly Brown.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    This book is only 14 pages.

    It is not worth $2. I am a little upset.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)