Marie Curie: A Brillant Life (Snapshots) by Elizabeth MacLeod, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Marie Curie: A Brillant Life (Snapshots)

Marie Curie: A Brillant Life (Snapshots)

4.0 1
by Elizabeth MacLeod
     
 
As a poor student in Paris, Marie Curie piled clothes -- and furniture -- on top of herself to keep warm at night. But Marie went on to become the first woman to win a Nobel Prize -- and also the first person to win this award twice. Marie Curie's discoveries in radiation changed the world. She became one of the most important women in science and her research is

Overview

As a poor student in Paris, Marie Curie piled clothes -- and furniture -- on top of herself to keep warm at night. But Marie went on to become the first woman to win a Nobel Prize -- and also the first person to win this award twice. Marie Curie's discoveries in radiation changed the world. She became one of the most important women in science and her research is still important to scientists and doctors today. Radiation is used as a treatment for cancer and to produce electricity, kill organisms that spoil food and detect smoke in homes. This book in the Snapshots: Images of People and Places in History series introduces one of the most important women in science and her inspiring life.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-This biography begins with Curie's childhood in Poland and follows her life and career through her death in 1934. Each chapter spread includes a page of text facing an arrangement of small photographs, commentary, and a cartoonlike depiction of Curie addressing readers via a dialogue balloon: "I was fascinated by radiation and couldn't wait to begin studying it." Unfortunately, the explanations of the basic science of radium and the discovery of the element are a bit unclear. Still, some of the individual pictures (Antoine-Henri Becquerel's actual photographic plate) and photos of Curie with other scientists (one with a young Albert Einstein) are interesting and enhance the text, and the book has browsing appeal. Steve Parker's Marie Curie and Radium (Chelsea, 1995) is better for reports and makes the discovery easier to understand.-Susan Lissim, Dwight School, New York City Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A fairly breathless biography delivers the facts in workmanlike style but without the spark of brilliance one might hope would be attached to the subject. Readers follow the pioneering physicist from her childhood and youth in Poland to her astonishing career in France with her husband, Pierre Curie. Much is told but little is shown as the narrative details Curie's struggles against ethnic and gender prejudice to get her education, her intense drive emphasized above all. Although occasional hints of the woman acknowledged to be one of the greatest minds in physics show through, Curie's later life is mostly presented as a bland catalogue of achievements. The design is pedestrian, each page of text faced with a page of illustrations and factoids; annoyingly, a little cartoon Curie walks the reader through these spreads, speech balloons offering such insights as, "I kept careful notes on everything, from making gooseberry jelly to experimenting in the lab." Although this offering may not inspire them, readers will discover plenty to appreciate in the subject. (chronology, list of museums, index) (Biography. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781553375708
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
08/28/2004
Series:
Snapshots: Images of People and Places in History Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.95(d)
Lexile:
960L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth MacLeod has written many children's books, including nine titles in the Snapshots Biography series; numerous titles in the Kids Can Read, Kids Books Of and Kids Can Do It series; Why Do Horses Have Manes?; What Did Dinosaurs Eat?; and Monster Fliers. She lives in Toronto.

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Marie Curie: A Brillant Life (Snapshots) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book telling the reader of Marie's many amazing accomplishments. Let's us see the importance of Marie's discoveries throughout  her life. I think that this well written book deserves at least four stars. From writing on Marie's childhood where she couldn't go see her  mother, to when she won a Nobel prize this book gives great information on Marie Cure's life.” I was fascinated by radiation and couldn't  wait to begin studying it." , shows Marie's intent fascination with learning more about her interest. Readers will be able to appreciate  Elizabeth MacLeod's methods of composing this book in a way which makes learning about Marie easier and interesting. From writing a  few paragraphs about her sad childhood "Marie's sister died of Typhus Fever when she was only nine and two years later her mother dies as well", to using pictures and side sentences. This book written by Elizabeth MacLeod was definitely well written and readers are able to see similarities in this book to others written like it. All in all a well written biography about the hard working life of Marie Curie. Deserving  four stars at the least this book will be able to tell about Marie's childhood, education, teenage life, adulthood and much more.