Mark Antony's Heroes: How the Third Gallica Legion Saved an Apostle and Created an Emperor

Mark Antony's Heroes: How the Third Gallica Legion Saved an Apostle and Created an Emperor

by Stephen Dando-Collins
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"A tough, gritty chronicle of the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of soldiers who operate in both military and politically treacherous waters. . . . Interesting and well-written."
?Booklist

In Mark Antony's Heroes, the fourth installment in the author's seminal histories of the legions of ancient Rome, Stephen Dando-Collins paints a vivid portrait of the

See more details below

Overview

"A tough, gritty chronicle of the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of soldiers who operate in both military and politically treacherous waters. . . . Interesting and well-written."
?Booklist

In Mark Antony's Heroes, the fourth installment in the author's seminal histories of the legions of ancient Rome, Stephen Dando-Collins paints a vivid portrait of the 3rd Gallica Legion from the unique vantage point of the soldiers. Drawing on classical texts, Dando-Collins tells the gripping story of a unit that made a name for itself under Mark Antony, only to watch its early glory fade and rise again.

Dreaded by friend and foe alike, they used their muscle to install Herod the Great and Caesar Vespasian on their thrones. They made Rome's enemies from one side of the empire to the other dread their legion's name. They were renowned as the fearless servants of two Mark Antonys, saving the skin of Cleopatra's lover and making possible the meteoric career of Mark Antony Primus.

By weaving together new information about the legionaries' lives with factual Roman military practices, Mark Antony's Heroes is a landmark in ancient military history.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The analysis of military tactics and players should be a carefully crafted exercise in historiography. It cannot be merely a laundry list of troop numbers (which should be in an appendix), but it cannot offer too much narrative elaboration, or one can end up with virtually fictional characters. Unfortunately, Dando-Collins (Caesar's Legion) displays both tendencies in his new book. The author is a good storyteller, but his habit of describing how ancient figures reacted emotionally in given situations is inappropriate for a historian. Claiming, e.g., that Roman statesman and general Mark Antony was smiling while making a decision is pointless and unreliable, even if an ancient commentator might have written it. The author's lack of discussion about his sources is particularly disturbing and throws many of his conclusions into doubt. Even though he goes into remarkable detail about the number of soldiers in each situation and the exact mileage of their marches, such unsourced statistics become wearying. The period he covers is fascinating for the historiography it has inspired (e.g., Victor Davis Hanson's The Western Way of War), yet this work seems not to recognize those discussions. Not recommended.
—Clay Williams

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118040805
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
02/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
654,629
File size:
1 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >