Marker (Jack Stapleton Series #5)

Marker (Jack Stapleton Series #5)

3.8 29
by Robin Cook
     
 

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With his signature blend of suspense and science, Robin Cook delivers an electrifying page-turner that delves into the murky ethics of developing genomic medicine and modern-day health care.


From the Paperback edition.  See more details below

Overview

With his signature blend of suspense and science, Robin Cook delivers an electrifying page-turner that delves into the murky ethics of developing genomic medicine and modern-day health care.


From the Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

A 28-year-old man with a minor leg fracture, a 36-year-old mother with a torn knee ligament...just hours after their routine surgeries, these healthy young people are dead, victims of a deviously clever serial killer. New York City medical examiners Dr. Laurie Montgomery and Dr. Jack Stapleton pursue the investigations despite the skepticism of superiors, who are not eager to attract headlines -- or lawsuits. Robin Cook's 25th medical thriller combines cutting-edge science with high-voltage action.
Publishers Weekly
The bestselling physician/author is in top form as he revisits the love/hate relationship between New York City medical examiners Laurie Montgomery and her lover, Jack Stapleton (last seen in 1999's Vector) in this gripping medical chiller. Childless and facing her 43rd birthday, Laurie moves out when Jack, still traumatized by the accidental deaths of his wife and children over a decade ago, refuses to talk marriage and babies. They've still got to work together at the office of the chief medical examiner, though, and it's there that Laurie's charged with autopsying the bodies of two people who died after minor surgeries at the same Manhattan hospital. As similar deaths mount up, Laurie struggles to convince Jack et al. that something's fishy. (Early on, a shadow plot introduces homicidal hospital employee Jasmine Rakoczi and Mr. Bob, the mastermind of a sinister but undefined plot to "sanction" selected patients using an undetectable medical agent.) Laurie's superiors forbid her to discuss her suspicions with anyone outside the OCME, but she disobeys these orders when she meets the dreamboat chief of medicine at the hospital in question and successfully engages his interest in her theory that a serial killer is on the loose. The body count climbs as another hospital is involved and political pressure mounts to suppress information. True love runs a rocky course, and the plot thickens before the denouement crackles to an electric edge-of-the-seat finale. Agent, Lynn Nesbit. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In his 25th case, the good doctor brings back Dr. Laurie Montgomery and Dr. Jack Stapleton (e.g., Vector) to figure out why so many healthy young people are dying in standard surgery. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101205303
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/24/2005
Series:
Jack Stapleton Series , #5
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
672
Sales rank:
74,438
File size:
550 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Robin Cook, M.D., is the author of more than thirty books and is credited with popularizing the medical thriller with his wildly successful first novel, Coma. He divides his time among Florida, New Hampshire, and Boston. His most recent novels include Host, Cell, and Nano.


From the Paperback edition.

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3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a nurse and work in a intensive care unit, Dr. Cook was dead on in his authors note at the end of this novel. Nurses are greatly underappreciated and underpaid. As the baby boomers in this field retire or burn out, nursing schools can not keep up at a pace to replace them and to make things worse the nurses who do enter the field quickly realize that not only are they under an enormous amount of pressure, but when things go wrong they more than likely are going to be the scape goat. Nurses who work the main floors have at time the responsibility of 8 patients of complicated medical issues, this type of situation usually sets the most experienced nurse up for failure. This is how 'Jazz' a nurse who's depicted in this novel is able to get and keep a job, what has changed is the availability of toxic meds on the floors. I have heard stories of meds like potassium being given in large doses by mistake on floors and in other situations which had devastating results. All in all I really enjoyed Marker, Dr. Cook does a really good job of describing the hospital scenes. The next time you are admitted to the hospital instead if asking who will be seeing you, you should ask how many patients including yourself will your nurse have.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Dr. Laurie Montgomery and Dr. Jack Stapleton (see VECTOR) both work for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner and off duty they are lovers living together although each has kept their own apartment. She wants marriage and children while Jack who lost his family is afraid of a commitment. One morning Laurie wakes up and realizes that at forty three she has very few child bearing years left and breaks it off with Jack. --- She throws herself into her work and she finds the case of a twenty-eight year old man very puzzling. He had a foot injury and died but there is no evidence what caused his death. When a woman who has had knee surgery dies for no apparent reason, Laurie begins to think that the two cases are related. When two more exact cases come in, Laurie begins to believe there is a serial killer operating in Manhattan General. As more cases pile up, the only thing the victims have in common is they were young, healthy and new subscribers to AmeriCare Health Insurance. Laurie investigates off the radar because the powers that be don¿t want to believe her and order her to keep her findings in house. --- Robin Cook has written another exciting trademark medical thriller that includes his opinion on the state of medical care in this country, the nursing shortage and the faults of the health care system which are all woven into a mesmerizing storyline. The heroine feels like the Lone Ranger as she struggles to get someone to listen to her and believe what she is saying. MARKER is another triumph for the grandmaster of medical thrillers.--- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I meant bolt
knitting-quilting More than 1 year ago
Another Robin Cook grabber. Couldn't put it down once I started reading. Don't miss this one, a continuation of Contagion.
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ABCScienceFictionReader More than 1 year ago
I could barely get through it. Just a repeat of previous plots and characters.
Prasvadh More than 1 year ago
Through 'Marker' novel, Robin Cook has exceptionally well-conveyed his candid thoughts about healthcare reforms, genetic markers & their role in predicting the disease in advance, in addition to intelligent coding of the human genome and some of the effects that it holds good for future research. This novel keeps you engrossed till the end & can be responsible for scintillating thoughts after the second half chapters. Worth Reading story that captures the negative consequences that discovery of markers holds true for many of the healthcare organizations & patients.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I was really disappointed with this book. Usually Robin Cook is really an interesting writer, and the books move along quickly. This one was a really slow mover...I didn't even finish the whole thing. It was apparent from the beginning what would happen and it was just too slow moving to make it worth the effort.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love most of Robin Cook's novels. This book in particular kept me very interested. Highly recommended!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoy his books, it keeps you going till the end. I like the medical issues since I am an RN and enjoy all his medical novels. MBrown
Guest More than 1 year ago
A serial killer is stalking patients in the hospital. Will Jack and Laurie get to them in time? As he has with prior novels, Cook weaves cutting edge medical discoveries (genetic markers) into his plot line. Despite doing so, I was disappointed in his use of the oldest trick in the book for bumping off the patients (potassium IV infusions). Anyone who knows anything about medicine would consider potassium first in a series of intentional sudden deaths in young people that have negative toxicology screens. So...rather than anticipating the next page, I felt more frustrated by how long it took Laurie and Jack to figure that out - it should've happened on page 50 rather than 400.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was better than Robin Cook's last 2 books.Was happy Cook brought back Jack and Laura. I've enjoyed there past adventures. This one however was only decent to Cook's ealier works. Still a decent book to read. I would tell people to read it
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robin Cook is back in top form with this timely medical thriller. His eye opening data on genetic markers has really generated questions on who has this information and why its underwraps.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a long time fan of Robin Cook and Marker is by far the best novel of his I've read in a while. The book brings back Laurie Montgomery and her lover, Jack Stapleton to investigate a series of mysterious deaths, all similar but at different hospitals. In the background, Jack and Laurie are trying to redefine their relationship. As always, Cook keeps the reader on the edge of one's seat from the first page to the last. Being a doctor himself, Cook sprinkles in a wide array of medical jargon and this only make the book more interesting. If you are a fan of the medical thriller and other authors such as Tess Gerritson and Michael Palmer, you will enjoy Marker.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book, as I do all his books. This book was probably 75 pages too long, but still a great read.