Market Approaches To Education

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Overview

The book contains a number of essays that address the recent debate on school choice and vouchers. In addition to papers that provide opinions on the role of government in education, the book offers a number of papers that analyze many of the issues employing advanced econometric techniques. Efforts have been made to balance arguments made by authors by including opposing views.

The book will contain three major parts. Part 1, Theory and Practice of Choice in Education, offers a discussion of the economic rationale for government interference in schooling and opposing views on private school choice and vouchers, whether educational production is not conducive for the creation of for-profit organizations, and a simulation study to discern, among others, the effect of choice on educational opportunity.

Part II, Are Private Schools Superior to Public Schools, contains several studies which compare achievement in public and private (especially parochial) schools, and what implications such results have for market approaches.

Part III, Empirical Studies of School Choice and Vouchers, contains research from several countries (US, Europe, Japan) concerning the success and failure of school choice programs.

The book contains a number of essays that address the recent debate on school choice and vouchers. In addition to papers that provide opinions on the role of government in education, the book offers a number of papers that analyze many of the issues employing advanced econometric techniques. Efforts have been made to balance arguments made by authors by including opposing views.

The book will contain three major parts. Part 1, Theory and Practice of Choice in Education, offers a discussion of the economic rationale for government interference in schooling and opposing views on private school choice and vouchers, whether educational production is not conducive for the creation of for-profit organizations, and a simulation study to discern, among others, the effect of choice on educational opportunity.

Part II, Are Private Schools Superior to Public Schools, contains several studies which compare achievement in public and private (especially parochial) schools, and what implications such results have for market approaches.

Part III, Empirical Studies of School Choice and Vouchers, contains research from several countries (US, Europe, Japan) concerning the success and failure of school choice programs

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780080425672
  • Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/25/1997
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Table of Contents

About the Editor
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction 1
Public and Private School Choices: Theoretical Considerations and Empirical Evidence 3
Pt. I Theory and Practice of Choice in Education 21
1 The Economics of Educational Choice 23
2 Public Schools and Excess Burden 57
3 Why Governments Run Schools 75
4 Educational Choice (Vouchers) and Social Mobility 97
5 An Application of a Structural Model of School Demand and Supply to Evaluate Alternative Designs of Voucher Education Systems 127
6 Charter Schools: A Viable Public School Choice Option? 153
Pt. II Are Private Schools Superior to Public Schools? 171
7 Achievement Growth in Public and Catholic High Schools 173
8 Comparing Public and Private Schools: The Puzzling Role of Selectivity Bias 213
9 Private School Versus Public School Achievement: Are There Findings That Affect the Educational Choice Debate? 239
10 Politics, Markets and the Organization of Schools 275
11 The Relative Effectiveness of Private and Public Schools: Evidence From Two Developing Countries 305
12 Comparing the Costs of Government and Private Primary Education in Thailand 329
Pt. III Empirical Studies of School Choice and Vouchers 351
13 Who Benefits from Educational Choice? Some evidence from Europe 353
14 Evaluating the Public Support for Educational Vouchers: A Case Study 381
15 Primary and Secondary School Choice Among Public and Religious Alternatives 393
16 Alert and Inert Clients: The Scottish Experience of Parental Choice of Schools 425
17 The Rise and Fall of Choice in Richmond, California 443
18 School Choice Policy in France: Success and Limitations 465
19 Benefits and Costs of Privatized Public Services: Lessons from the Dutch Educational System 479
20 A Look at Choice in the Netherlands 499
21 Choices of Education in Japan 511
Index 527
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