Market Education: The Unknown History

Overview

Discontent with public education has been on the rise in recent years, as parents complain that their children are not being taught the basics, that they are not pushed to excel, and that their classrooms are too chaotic to encourage any real learning. The public has begun to reject school bond levies with regularity, frustrated by what it perceives to be mounting education costs unaccompanied by increased achievement or accountability.

Coulson explores the educational problems ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $16.86   
  • New (1) from $133.49   
  • Used (7) from $0.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

Discontent with public education has been on the rise in recent years, as parents complain that their children are not being taught the basics, that they are not pushed to excel, and that their classrooms are too chaotic to encourage any real learning. The public has begun to reject school bond levies with regularity, frustrated by what it perceives to be mounting education costs unaccompanied by increased achievement or accountability.

Coulson explores the educational problems facing parents and shows how these problems can best be addressed. He begins with a discussion of what people want from their school systems, tracing their views of the kinds of knowledge, skills, and values education should impart, and their concerns over discipline, drugs, and violence in public schools. Using this survey of goals and attitudes as a guide, Coulson sets out to compare the school systems of civilizations both ancient and modern, seeking to determine which systems successfully educated generations past and which did not. His historical study ranges from classical Greece and ancient Rome, through the Islamic world of the Middle Ages, to nineteenth-century England and modern America.

Drawing on the historical evidence of how these various systems operated, Coulson concludes that free educational markets have consistently done a better job of serving the public's needs than state-run school systems have. He sets out a blueprint for competitive, free-market educational reform that would make schools more flexible, more innovative, and more responsive to the needs of parents and students. He describes how education for low-income children might be funded under a market system, and how the transition from monopolistic public education to market education might be achieved.

Coulson's Market Education touches on a wide range of issues, including declines in academic achievement, minority education, the role of public school teachers, and mismanagement and corruption in educational bureaucracies. Coulson examines alternative reform proposals from vouchers and charter schools to national standards for school curricula. This timely and engaging book will appeal to parents, educators, and others concerned with the quality and cost of schooling, and will serve as an excellent resource in college courses on the economics and history of education.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Working from an historical perspective, Coulson has written an apologia for competitive, free market education… In Coulson's terms competitive, free market education will provide for a more innovative, more flexible, and more responsive system of schooling… Coulson believes that a competitive school system will result in more flexibility and a new range of schooling alternatives in all shapes and sizes. All levels.”

—R. J. Reynolds, Choice

“In this unusually well written and thoroughly researched book, Andrew J. Coulson ranges from ancient Greece and Rome to modern America and Japan to document his conclusion that parental choice in a private educational market is afar more effective system for educating children than government-run schools. Encyclopedic in its coverage of the arguments for and against alternative modes of organizing schooling, readers will find this excellent book instructive whether they agree or disagree with his conclusion.”

—Milton Friedman, Nobel Laureate in Economics

“Coulson’s [Market Education] is a sweeping blow to those of us who keep hoping the system that served earlier generations reasonably well can be helped to overcome the effects of bad policies, inadequate teachers, disengaged parents, and indifferent students to perform its magic yet again. He wonders if the magic was ever there. . . .”

—William Raspberry, The Washington Post

“School choice has a much longer history than most imagine. All those committed to school reform should read this fascinating historical account.”

—Paul Peterson, Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government, and Director of the Program on Education, Policy, and Governance, Harvard University

“American schools cost more than do those in most other countries. Yet, the longer our students are in school, the further they fall behind students in other advanced countries. Andrew Coulson draws upon both history and current research to identify clear reasons for such poor results. His book convincingly tells policymakers and parents how to solve the deep-seated problems of our schools.”

—Herbert J. Walberg, Research Professor of Education and Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago

William Raspberry
Coulson's is a sweeping blow to those of us who keep hoping the system that served earlier generations reasonably well can be helped to overcome the effects of bad policies, inadequate teachers, disengaged parents and indifferent students to perform their magic yet again. He wonders if the magic was ever there. -- Washington Post
Booknews
A Seattle-based researcher with the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, Coulson traverses what we want, what's been tried, and what works in school systems ancient and contemporary, to support his argument that free educational markets serve the public's needs better than state-run monopolistic schooling. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Andrew J. Coulson is an independent scholar based in Seattle, Washington, and a contributing editor to Education Policy Analysis Archives.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Pt. I What We Want
1 Getting Used to Disappointment 7
Pt. II What's Been Tried
2 Right from the Beginning: Classical Athens and Beyond 37
3 Revolutions: The More Things Change 73
4 Coup d'Ecole: The War for Control of American Education 107
5 Teachers and Teaching in the Government Schools 139
6 The Performance Crisis in Public Schooling 177
7 Common School Problems: The World Tour 219
8 The Class Really Is Keener on the Other Side: The Case of Independent Schools 259
Pt. III What Works
9 What Makes Schools Work? 293
10 Can Government Schooling Be Fixed? 323
Conclusion: Achieving Educational Excellence 367
Notes 393
Index 453
About the Author 471
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2003

    Everyone should read this book.

    This book truly changed how I view the institution of public education. While I used to consider myself part of the camp of people who believe that the source of the problem with public education is a lack of proper funding, 'Market Education' enabled me to remove my blinders so that I could see that the source of the problem is public education itself. Coulson does a great job of explaining how it is untrue that public education aids in the development of an educated and peaceful society, and in fact shows how state-run education creates a less educated and more hostile populous. He derails nearly every supportive argument for the maintenance of the educational system as we know it, and provides a fairly good proposal for a better educational future. This book should be required reading for all college education majors. It's always healthy for people to question their myths, and this book does just that concerning the myth that says we need the government to education us.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)